• Welcome to the Cricket Web forums, one of the biggest forums in the world dedicated to cricket.

    You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join the Cricket Web community today!

    If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.

Ponting: Amongst the Top 5 Fielders?

Maximus0723

State Regular
Where do you think he ranks?

I would go,

Jonty
AB
Collingwood
Ponting

Then again, I feel like I am forgetting someone...

Ignore slip fielding/fielders!!!
 
Last edited:

vic_orthdox

Global Moderator
He'd have to be there and abouts in the modern era.

His slip catching is probably a level below his ring fielding though. He's a good slipper, but has long been one of the best in the ring.
 

Burgey

Request Your Custom Title Now!
Colin Bland
Paul Collingwood
Neil Harvey
Gary Sobers
Viv Richards
Gus Logie
Roger Harper
Mark Waugh

in no particular order, all belong in this argument, as do many others probably.
 

vcs

Request Your Custom Title Now!
Mohammad Azharuddin is the best Indian fielder I've seen. Lethal at hitting the stumps from anywhere within the circle. For a while, I thought Yuvraj might live up to those standards, but he hasn't.
 

Teja.

Global Moderator
Eknath Solkar.

Daylight

Viv Richards

Jhonty Rhodes

Mark Waugh

Ricky Ponting

That would be my top 5 list.

Rahul Dravid is not very athletic but has one of the safest pair of hands ever as evidenced by his record.
 

Athlai

Not Terrible
Top 5 slippers of the modern era would be an interesting list.

Fleming would be up there.
 

Teja.

Global Moderator
Brilliant piece on Ekki

Wisden Cricketers' Almanack obituary

SOLKAR, EKNATH DHONDU, died on June 26, 2005. He was 57, and suffered from diabetes. Statistically, Solkar remains Test cricket's most successful fielder, with 53 catches in just 27 matches - of those who played at least ten, the nextbest is Bob Simpson's 110 in 62 Tests, or 1.77 per match to Solkar's 1.96. The top catchers are usually firmly camped in the slip cordon, but most of Solkar's came at forward short leg, where he lurked uncomfortably up close and personal to the batsman. Bishan Bedi, one of the great Indian spinners of the time whose menace was greatly enhanced by this, confirmed: "His close-in catching was really intimidating. We would not have been the same bowlers without him." Tony Greig, an opponent in the 1972-73 series in India, said: "Ekki was the best forward short leg I have ever seen." His catching was often preceded by some very idiosyncratic sledging. "I'll get you, bloody," he advised Geoff Boycott, and he told Garry Sobers to mind his own business. Solkar rose from humble roots. His father was the groundsman at the Hindu Gymkhana in Bombay, and he grew up in a oneroom hut on the ground shared with his parents and five siblings (one of whom, Anant, also played first-class cricket). He impressed the Bombay players with his bowling in the nets, and turned himself into a handy all-rounder, allying adhesive batting to his enthusiastic left-arm seamers - for Indian Schools, who he captained despite his lowly birth; for Bombay, taking six for 38 on his Ranji Trophy debut in 1966-67; for Sussex in one match in 1969; and then for India. Some affectionately called him "the poor man's Sobers", but he outdid even him in India's victory in the West Indies in 1970-71, with six catches and a crucial 55 in the only definite result, India's win at Port-of-Spain. Later in 1971, he played an equally vital role in India's first Test and series victory in England, with 44 and three wickets in a famous triumph at The Oval. There were also three catches, one - in England's second-innings collapse to dispose of Alan Knott, who had made 90 first time around - as fine as any, when Solkar was stationed even closer than usual.

Wisden Cricketer obituary

In the 1970s, when Indian cricket was hovering near the top of the world, the image of Eknath Solkar diving for a catch was as firmly embedded in the collective consciousness of a nation as Sunil Gavaskar's straight drive or the skills of India's spin quartet. "We would never have been as effective without Solkar at short leg," Bishan Bedi once said.

Eknath Dhondu Solkar, who died of a heart attack aged 57, was sometimes called the `poor man's Garry Sobers' because he could bat anywhere, and bowl both medium-pace and spin. As a fielder, however, he held his own. When India beat West Indies for the first time ever, at Port of Spain in 1970-71, Solkar equalled the then world record of six catches in a Test.

His 53 catches came at almost two a match, the best ratio among fielders with over 50 catches. He toured the Caribbean and New Zealand in 1975-76 on the strength of his fielding alone, for by then Solkar the bowler had virtually ceased to exist, and as a batsman he was no longer `Mr Dependable'.

So assured were Solkar's hands - he made catches where other fielders might have seen barely a half chance - that, like a Bradman zero, a Solkar miss made the headlines when he was in his prime. His best catch was the running, tumbling effort that ended Clive Lloyd's fiery 163 in a Bangalore Test. "The ball was dipping away from me," he explained.

In the 1972-73 home series against England, he caught 12 batsmen in the first three Tests and needed only three more to equal Syd Gregory's long-standing world record. He dropped Graham Roope in the fourth Test, and didn't get another chance. While Lloyd made 242 in the Mumbai Test two years later, he dropped him early. Towards the end the stress of fielding in the `suicide position' unprotected (no helmet or shin guards) began to tell on him.

The stress in the early days, when he shared a single room with his parents and five siblings, was of a different nature. Solkar's father was a groundsman at the P J Hindu Gymkhana in Bombay. The legendary allrounder Vinoo Mankad first encouraged him to play a more organised game. He was a left-arm spinner and a batsman good enough to lead Indian Schoolboys. Four years later, he made his Test debut against New Zealand.

The `Mr Dependable' tag was earned early. In the first Test of that successful 1970-71 West Indies series, India were 75 for 5 before Solkar's 61 helped Dilip Sardesai add 137. Three Tests later India were 70 for 6 when the same pair put on 186. In the next series, Solkar's 67 helped India win at Lord's.

Solkar was 28 when he played the last of his 27 Tests, ending up with 1,068 runs at 25.42. Better counselling may have extended his career, and better planning might have seen him concentrate on batting alone. But 30 years ago cricket teams did not travel with psychologists and other assorted gurus, and a talented player was allowed to wither away.
 

Ikki

Hall of Fame Member
I'd say so. Also Rhodes, Richards, heck even Symonds...there are a few but I'd put him up there.
 

Athlai

Not Terrible
Would say that if you are just talking about top fielders without a long career involved there a plenty of lower end players like Lou Vincent who are better than Ponting. The fact Ponting is an all-time great batsman as well as being a top class fielder makes him more special though.
 

Maximus0723

State Regular
Would say that if you are just talking about top fielders without a long career involved there a plenty of lower end players like Lou Vincent who are better than Ponting. The fact Ponting is an all-time great batsman as well as being a top class fielder makes him more special though.
True.

Tho had forgotten about Lou. I would say cut off is 150 ODIs for contemporary and 100 for older folks.
 

vic_orthdox

Global Moderator
Rhodes is still the best 'mover' to a cricket ball that I've seen. He was on it before blokes had a chance to even call for a run.

Ponting wasn't quite as quick as that, but what he does/did is hit the stumps with amazing regularity when the opportunity is offing.
 

Maximus0723

State Regular
Rhodes is still the best 'mover' to a cricket ball that I've seen. He was on it before blokes had a chance to even call for a run.

Ponting wasn't quite as quick as that, but what he does/did is hit the stumps with amazing regularity when the opportunity is offing.
That reminds me of something.

Is there any stat that tells us how many runouts a player was involved in.
 

Johnners

Cricket Web: All-Time Legend
Pretty Katich has the run-out debate sewn up.

Wait...you're talking about whilst fielding
 

Zinzan

Request Your Custom Title Now!
Interesting extract from Nathan Astle's book....

"At his peak, I'd rate Harry (Chris Harris) as the best fielder I ever played with. People talk a lot about Jonty Rhodes, and what a good fielder he was, and that's true. But if you watch the two, Harry was more of an athlete as far as catching & picking a ball up cleanly. Jonty was a great stopper of a cricket ball, but if you put videos of the two side by side, I believe you'd find Harry was not only a great stopper, but nine times out of ten times would pick it up cleanly, which made him more dangerous to the batting side."
 

Himannv

International Captain
I think Rhodes was out of this world as far as fielding is concerned. Mark Waugh could probably catch anything thrown at him and make it look elementary. I think Ponting was better earlier on in his career but at his peak I'd agree that he would possibly have made it into the top 5.
 

Top