• Welcome to the Cricket Web forums, one of the biggest forums in the world dedicated to cricket.

    You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join the Cricket Web community today!

    If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.

Mohammad Amir retires from tests

harsh.ag

Cricket Web: All-Time Legend
That's probably because they expected a lot more from his return than people here did.
 

Kirkut

International Debutant
Precisely, it would be like allowing a drop of urine to fall into your drink, and then be told "don't worry, most of the drink is still ok". The entire match was contaminated, and this is reflected in the fact that he was charged (and convicted of) a criminal offence that is habitually used for dealing with match-fixers.
Let's hypothetically assume he was not banned for 5 years, what was the guarantee that he would have not been dishonest in these 5 years of cricket had he played them?

Actually 5 years of punishment is a boon in my opinion. It may have impacted his cricket but it served a life lesson for him to stay clean.
 

Flem274*

123/5
look bois, once you're bought you're bought. you don't get to negotiate with your owner. amir became the property of the bookies. if they said later 'help throw this game' he can't say no or at worst they'll expose his previous actions. they owned him.
 

GIMH

Norwood's on Fire
look bois, once you're bought you're bought. you don't get to negotiate with your owner. amir became the property of the bookies. if they said later 'help throw this game' he can't say no or at worst they'll expose his previous actions. they owned him.
Exactly this.
 

Maximas

Cricketer Of The Year
look bois, once you're bought you're bought. you don't get to negotiate with your owner. amir became the property of the bookies. if they said later 'help throw this game' he can't say no or at worst they'll expose his previous actions. they owned him.
Was this the nature of the relationship between the bookies and Amir? I always had the idea that Salmon Butt played a much greater role in this regard

You make a good point however
 

Kirkut

International Debutant
The good about him obviously was his bowling, he has the most fluid bowling action ever and generated pace without effort. In 2010 it seemed he was on the verge of becoming a perfect fast bowler.
 

andmark

International Captain
It is quite painful as a spectator. Before the scandal, he obviously was a great bowler and superb to watch. Almost a complete waste for test cricket given everything he could've achieved and entertainment he would've provided if not for what happened.
 

mr_mister

Hall of Fame Member
look bois, once you're bought you're bought. you don't get to negotiate with your owner. amir became the property of the bookies. if they said later 'help throw this game' he can't say no or at worst they'll expose his previous actions. they owned him.
This makes match fixing players more sympathetic
 

Burgey

Request Your Custom Title Now!
The problem with this sort of thing is once you’re tainted and you have an inevitable off day, everyone wonders if you’re out of form, or not having a go because it’s in your interests not to.
 

cnerd123

likes this
Don't even see how Flem's point is relevant to Amir's case tbh. He already got caught and punished, how do the bookies have any leverage left on him?

The only players stuck in the vicious loop Flem describes are the ones we don't know/never found out about
 

mr_mister

Hall of Fame Member
What Flem described seemed very much how Hansie got in too deep

The first time he took money to lose a match, he didn't tell another soul and just watched on as the Saffas predictably collapsed in a tough chase. In his words it was money for jam.
 
Last edited:

Xuhaib

International Coach
Strange timing. In his.last 6 tests he had taken 24 @ 21 coupled with his world cup stats I think his bowling skills and intelligence was finally getting in tuned with his lower pace post return.I think this desicion just shows he will always be a money whore, he does not want to play the most physically demanding format and risk being totally totally done by 31-32 instead this way he can extend his earning potential till he is 35-37 playing LOI and various T-20 leagues.
Personally I am not to worried by this development I like the current pace bowling stocks we have and post ban Amir is really not that huge of a loss tbh
 

GIMH

Norwood's on Fire
Don't even see how Flem's point is relevant to Amir's case tbh. He already got caught and punished, how do the bookies have any leverage left on him?

The only players stuck in the vicious loop Flem describes are the ones we don't know/never found out about
He’s saying it in reference to the difference between spot and match fixing
 

Flem274*

123/5
yes, i was addressing the hair splitting excuses for him. when it comes to big money crime, if you're an asset, you're an asset. you don't get autonomy.
 

quincywagstaff

International Debutant
It seemed that it was only in English conditions could Amir really seem like a world-class bowler since his return. He just didn't have the pace to be enough of a threat elsewhere.

I remember watching him last year in ODIs against a weak Zimbabwe lineup and even there he looked ineffectual.
 

Top