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2nd Test at the MCG, Melbourne, 26 Dec - 30 Dec 2020

gabbadan

School Boy/Girl Cricketer
Never heard of a leader in bowling packs. The Captain dictates who bowls and when after discussion with the coach and the bowlers prior to each session.
Conditions may change the plan on the field.
 
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Son Of Coco

Hall of Fame Member
Never heard of a leader in bowling packs. The Captain dictates who bowls and when after discussion with the coach and the bowlers prior to each session.
Conditions may change the plan on the field.
I think there's definitely a bowler who considers himself the leader in many packs. Whether or not that's the reality as far as the team is concerned is another thing, and I don't know if it holds true at higher levels where what you say is probably true. Certainly at grade level there is always an opening bowler who chooses which end he bowls at and the rest fall in around that, but given a fast bowler's penchant for going downwind without giving any consideration to whether or not the conditions suit the bloke at the other end (e.g.: he'll go downwind despite the fact he swings it away from the batsman and the breeze is angling towards fine leg from his end and the bloke at the other end swings it in and now has to do so into a stiff cross breeze), it's probably best if they're not even brought into the discussion. Can remember a game where we took 8/40 from one end and 2/145 from the other and lost the match. Guess which end I chose? :ph34r:
 

GotSpin

Hall of Fame Member
Never heard of a leader in bowling packs. The Captain dictates who bowls and when after discussion with the coach and the bowlers prior to each session.
Conditions may change the plan on the field.
Have you played much cricket?
 

cnerd123

likes this
there is definitely a leader for bowling attacks in Test cricket. Usually it's the bowler who the captain turns too when all other plans have failed.
 

Son Of Coco

Hall of Fame Member
there is definitely a leader for bowling attacks in Test cricket. Usually it's the bowler who the captain turns too when all other plans have failed.
I think it functions a little differently though. I'd consider Pat Cummins the leader of our attack, but his role still fits within the overall team plan depending on the match situation/conditions. As you say though, when the plans haven't worked, you find out pretty quickly who the no.1 bowler is considered to be as they are generally relied upon to make the breakthrough.
 

Daemon

Request Your Custom Title Now!
Ben Stokes may not be the "leader of the attack" per se but he is absolutely the heart and soul of that team.
Yeah 100%. He's had some great knocks etc but the match that drove this point home for me was the flattie at Mount Maunganui where he bowled a really long spell and seemed like the only one who was interested in breaking the Santner Watling partnership.
 

Teja.

Global Moderator
Santner for New Zealand.

Attack leaders definitely exist but I feel like it hasn't been defined very well in this thread...
AWTA. Being especially good at breaking partnerships is not equivalent to being the leader necessarily.
 

ankitj

Hall of Fame Member
Partnership breakers are generally **** trundlers in the team. McGrath was never called a partnership breaker; Tendulkar and Ganguly on the other hand were. That tells you everything about the concept of "partnership breaking bowlers"
 

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