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Is Dhoni greatest OdI cricketer off all-time

Red

The artist formerly known as Monk
To me, RPI is a better metric in tests (still very context heavy and therefore prone to be used badly) than it ever is in LO formats. And it is a poor metric on its own, even in tests.
I can't see your rationale for this. RPI makes far more sense in ODIs. ODI innings are a complete closed circuit. Your RPI is the average of what you contribute to a team over a career. And if a top order batsman is still there in the 50th or the 20th over (especially in 1st innings), they should make every effort to hit out, and increase their likelihood of dismissal. Obviously this is dependant on match conditions but it's generally true.

There's far more variables in tests. Declarations, teams winning in the 4th innings only 2/3/4 etc wickets down...
 

honestbharani

Whatever it takes!!!
And if a top order batsman is still there in the 50th or the 20th over (especially in 1st innings), they should make every effort to hit out, and increase their likelihood of dismissal.
And yet you do not consider the fact that a top order batsman essentially can contribute far far more runs per innings in a LO game than any middle order batsman ever can.
 

Daemon

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I think RPI is an ok tool if you want to compare between specific roles in the team.

Comparing openers to lower order batsmen using RPI doesn't really make sense though.
 

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