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Cricket Books

Teja.

Global Moderator
Just started it, really neat so far. The only compliant is that in the preface he spends so much time demonizing the West Indians, questioning their legacy and taking great pains to point out that the English were saints in comparision, in a book which isn't about the West Indians.

Thought it was a bit unusual.
 

Days of Grace

International Captain
It’s a great read and I still have a copy on my shelves.

I think from memory he was trying to place intimidatory bowling in a historical context, arguing that it had always been in the game, if you had the tools. Was quite a long section on Frank Foster, for example.
 

tony p

U19 Cricketer
Just finished reading Stephen Chalke's book on Geoff Cope " In Sunshine and In Shadow".

Another really good read on a Lesser known cricketer that he doe's so well.

If you haven't read any of his books, I recommend him, particularly on cricket & cricketer's from the 1950's to the 1980's, none of them usually household names, which makes them far more interesting

Best one's I've read from him are the ones on,
Tom Cartwright
Bob Appleyard
Geoffrey Howard
Run's in the memory- County cricket in the 1950's &
Summer's Crown, A story of the County Championship, which is an excellent read.

And no, I'm not Stephen Chalke, and I haven't been paid to say this.:D
 

fredfertang

Cricket Web: All-Time Legend
I vaguely recall Bodyline Autopsy (which is, IMHO, the definitive take on the 32/33 series, by the way) being named CW's book of the decade for the noughties.

Did I miss the announcement of the book of the 2010s or are the votes still being counted...? :whistling
Still waiting to hear from Archie, who seems to have gone to ground
 

BoyBrumby

Englishman
Just started it, really neat so far. The only compliant is that in the preface he spends so much time demonizing the West Indians, questioning their legacy and taking great pains to point out that the English were saints in comparision, in a book which isn't about the West Indians.

Thought it was a bit unusual.
It's been well over a decade since I last read Bodyline Autopsy, but from memory Frith was a wee bit sniffy about the Windies quicks of the 70s and 80s, yes.

The charitable view is he was drawing a contrast between how posterity has judged Jardine & Lloyd as captains. Leg theory was deployed relatively sparingly really, given that Gubby Allen flat-out refused to bowl it (although he wasn't above fielding in the leg trap) & Verity and Hammond were both used a fair amount in 32/33 as well.

The Windies' barrage under the Big Cat was fairly relentless as, often as not, they had four genuine quicks in their armoury.
 

Pothas

Hall of Fame Member
This has finally nudged me into starting this, have probably owned it for about 10 years.

Agree the focus on the West Indies in the preface is kind of jarring. The rest of it is great so far though. It is the second book I have read in which Bill Bowes very much features as a secondary character but he really stands out for some reason.
 

Jumno

School Boy/Girl Cricketer
I have Ricky Ponting's world cup 2003 diary, Ricky Ponting biography, Ben Stokes, Glenn McGrath, Brett Lee, all good reads which the latter books give an insight of their earlier days and progression.
 

Line and Length

International Vice-Captain
Without going through all the earlier posts, has anyone read "Bradman's War" by Malcolm Knox? It doesn't always show the done in the most flattering light but it is a fascinating read.
I've also been trying to get my hands on the Keith Miller biography, "Golden Nugget" by R.S.Whitington. I borrowed it from the library some years ago but it has since been written off by the library staff.
 

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