Cricket Betting Site Betway
Page 10 of 10 FirstFirst ... 8910
Results 136 to 139 of 139
Like Tree10Likes

Thread: Modern-day batsmen and flat pitches

  1. #136
    Request Your Custom Title Now! Uppercut's Avatar
    Tournaments Won: 1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    .
    Posts
    30,399
    Quote Originally Posted by Manee View Post
    Not sure about that, considering the amount of openers that we got through in the late 1990s and early 2000s.
    Most of them were poor cricketers though. At times it's quite visibly easier to bat against a new ball in India than an old ball. After the 20th over there are either spinners or fast bowlers bowling reverse swing, both of whom are more effective than quicks bowling with a new ball that isn't doing anything.

    Although usually in India, batting is straightforward whatever stage the match is at.

  2. #137
    Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Nowhere
    Posts
    4,793
    Quote Originally Posted by Uppercut View Post
    Most of them were poor cricketers though. At times it's quite visibly easier to bat against a new ball in India than an old ball. After the 20th over there are either spinners or fast bowlers bowling reverse swing, both of whom are more effective than quicks bowling with a new ball that isn't doing anything.

    Although usually in India, batting is straightforward whatever stage the match is at.
    The lack of good Indian openers (apart from Gavaskar) as compared to good middle order players, which has been a trend in our cricketing history, till the 2000s, is good proof of the fact hat opening has not been actually that easy a job in India.

    I am not sure what you meant by "batting is straightforward" in India either. The necessary adjustments need to be made like to adjust for the variable bounce, to crouch more and play deliveries around shin height, to play spin off the backfoot wherever possible so as to earn maximum time to judge it etc.

  3. #138
    Hall of Fame Member aussie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Fine Leg/Technical Area
    Posts
    17,446
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard View Post
    I remember that Test well and the deck offered a decent bit in the opening session-and-a-bit, hence Pollock (who was by then only capable of bowling really well on seaming decks no longer flat ones) and co. reduced India to 60-odd for 4. Tendulkar played superbly for 20 overs or so to coast that out, Sehwag played really well for about 5-6 overs to do likewise. They then both made spectacular hay when the deck flattened-out, which it did and remained thus for the rest of the game.

    That's why I think Sehwag's best would've come as a middle-order batsman if decks were green more often over his career.
    Bullet..thats my boy i know for fact uncle Richard does turk cricket on Skysports like me..

  4. #139
    Cricket Web Staff Member Richard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    2005
    Posts
    80,401
    Quote Originally Posted by Uppercut View Post
    Most of them were poor cricketers though. At times it's quite visibly easier to bat against a new ball in India than an old ball. After the 20th over there are either spinners or fast bowlers bowling reverse swing, both of whom are more effective than quicks bowling with a new ball that isn't doing anything.

    Although usually in India, batting is straightforward whatever stage the match is at.
    In recent years it has been (as elsewhere) but before 2001/02 batting at most Indian Test grounds was usually a trial by spin. There has always been the odd ground which typically produces the "slow ****heap" which offers nothing to any bowler and doesn't make scoring especially easy either (what I just call a "bad pitch"), but until pretty recently there were more spin-friendly decks than not.

    Also no-one will convince me that most Indian openers of the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s were poor batsmen. To date there's no evidence Wasim Jaffer or Gautam Gambhir are any better than Vikram Rathour or Devang Gandhi, even though they've enjoyed far more success. Shiv Sundar Das too was an excellent technician prone to lapses in concentration and Navjot Sidhu was a fine batsman.

    Good-quality new-ball bowlers have typically prospered in India, because it does swing if they use the right ball (India is one of the few places to hold-out against the use of Kookaburras, though they currently use SGs which are still inferior to Dukes and Readers).
    RD
    Appreciating cricket's greatest legend ever - HD Bird...............Funniest post (intentionally) ever.....Runner-up.....Third.....Fourth
    (Accidental) founder of Twenty20 Is Boring Society. Click and post to sign-up.
    chris.hinton: h
    FRAZ: Arshad's are a long gone stories
    RIP Fardin Qayyumi (AKA "cricket player"; "Bob"), 1/11/1990-15/4/2006


Page 10 of 10 FirstFirst ... 8910


Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 207
    Last Post: 12-02-2009, 04:17 AM
  2. Giles retires
    By Steulen in forum Cricket Chat
    Replies: 186
    Last Post: 14-08-2007, 11:32 AM
  3. Lara the greatest among his peers
    By Perm in forum Cricket Chat
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 05-11-2006, 03:07 PM
  4. Era of flat pitches
    By Craig in forum Cricket Chat
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: 20-12-2003, 08:00 AM
  5. Replies: 253
    Last Post: 30-08-2002, 11:53 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •