• Welcome to the Cricket Web forums, one of the biggest forums in the world dedicated to cricket.

    You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join the Cricket Web community today!

    If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.

Ping pong

sanan

Cricket Spectator
Does my ping pong need rubber or not?

No. Paddles made for beginners do not tend to have rubber, which is ideal if you're just starting out because it allows for better control of your shots. Generally, this means that you can focus more on developing your form rather than fighting with your equipment. It also makes it easier to transition into playing with advanced paddles later on since they are generally faster due to increased speed of play If you are already comfortable with a paddle without rubber, then you should stick with that.

Paddles made for beginners do not tend to have rubber, which is ideal if you're just starting out because it allows for better control of your shots. Generally, this means that you can focus more on developing your form rather than fighting with your equipment. It also makes it easier to transition into playing with advanced paddles later on since they are generally faster due to increased speed of play If you are already comfortable with a paddle without rubber, then you should stick with that. The only time the rubber issue comes up is when someone who isn't used to using anything other than an anti-spin rubber (for example) tries to use an allround bat like an offensive blade. Then the difference can be significant, but otherwise it's not a major concern.

What is an inverted rubber racket? Inverted rubber is made with a combination of hard and soft materials. As a result, it is flexible enough to bend very easily when placed under pressure from a ball hit by the opponent, just as regular rubbers do. However, this “give” or flexibility also allows inverted rubber to spring back into place more quickly after a ball has been struck because there is less material warping out of shape than on harder rubbers. This helps players better return powerful shots from their opponents since inverted rubber often has additional grip from being textured in several different ways. Long pimples are where you will find these long, textured pips of rubber on a paddle. This allows players to have greater control over the amount of spin and speed they want for each shot. Inverted pimples are more common on offensive style paddles, while short pimpled inverted rubbers are more common on defensive-style paddles.

Inverted rubber is made with a combination of hard and soft materials. As a result, it is flexible enough to bend very easily when placed under pressure from a ball hit by the opponent, just as regular rubbers do. However, this “give” or flexibility also allows inverted rubber to spring back into place more quickly after a ball has been struck because there is less material warping out of shape than on harder rubbers. This helps players better return powerful shots from their opponents since inverted rubber often has additional grip from being textured in several different ways.

What is an inverted rubber racket? Long pimples are where you will find these long, texture pips of rubber on a Paddlles. This allows the player to have greater control over the amount of spin and speed they want for each shot. Inverted long pimples are more common on offensive style paddles, while short pimpled inverted rubbers are more common on defensive-style paddles.

Who uses inverted rubbers? Defensive players who commonly play close to the table as this allows them to quickly recover after blocking a shot and produce their own quick counterattacks because of its enhanced ability to change direction. Offensive players may use inverted rubber because it increases the amount of spin they can put on a ball, or to neutralize their opponent's ability to produce heavy backspin.

The defensive player who commonly plays close to the table as this allows them to quickly recover after blocking a shot and produce their own quick counterattacks because of its enhanced ability to change direction. This type of rubber is extremely useful for offensive players since it increases the amount of spin they can put on a ball, or to neutralize their opponent's ability to produce heavy backspin.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Red_Ink_Squid

International Captain
Does my ping pong need rubber or not?

No. Paddles made for beginners do not tend to have rubber, which is ideal if you're just starting out because it allows for better control of your shots. Generally, this means that you can focus more on developing your form rather than fighting with your equipment. It also makes it easier to transition into playing with advanced paddles later on since they are generally faster due to increased speed of play If you are already comfortable with a paddle without rubber, then you should stick with that.

Paddles made for beginners do not tend to have rubber, which is ideal if you're just starting out because it allows for better control of your shots. Generally, this means that you can focus more on developing your form rather than fighting with your equipment. It also makes it easier to transition into playing with advanced paddles later on since they are generally faster due to increased speed of play If you are already comfortable with a paddle without rubber, then you should stick with that. The only time the rubber issue comes up is when someone who isn't used to using anything other than an anti-spin rubber (for example) tries to use an allround bat like an offensive blade. Then the difference can be significant, but otherwise it's not a major concern.

What is an inverted rubber racket? Inverted rubber is made with a combination of hard and soft materials. As a result, it is flexible enough to bend very easily when placed under pressure from a ball hit by the opponent, just as regular rubbers do. However, this “give” or flexibility also allows inverted rubber to spring back into place more quickly after a ball has been struck because there is less material warping out of shape than on harder rubbers. This helps players better return powerful shots from their opponents since inverted rubber often has additional grip from being textured in several different ways. Long pimples are where you will find these long, textured pips of rubber on a paddle. This allows players to have greater control over the amount of spin and speed they want for each shot. Inverted pimples are more common on offensive style paddles, while short pimpled inverted rubbers are more common on defensive-style paddles.

Inverted rubber is made with a combination of hard and soft materials. As a result, it is flexible enough to bend very easily when placed under pressure from a ball hit by the opponent, just as regular rubbers do. However, this “give” or flexibility also allows inverted rubber to spring back into place more quickly after a ball has been struck because there is less material warping out of shape than on harder rubbers. This helps players better return powerful shots from their opponents since inverted rubber often has additional grip from being textured in several different ways.

What is an inverted rubber racket? Long pimples are where you will find these long, texture pips of rubber on a Paddlles. This allows the player to have greater control over the amount of spin and speed they want for each shot. Inverted long pimples are more common on offensive style paddles, while short pimpled inverted rubbers are more common on defensive-style paddles.

Who uses inverted rubbers? Defensive players who commonly play close to the table as this allows them to quickly recover after blocking a shot and produce their own quick counterattacks because of its enhanced ability to change direction. Offensive players may use inverted rubber because it increases the amount of spin they can put on a ball, or to neutralize their opponent's ability to produce heavy backspin.

The defensive player who commonly plays close to the table as this allows them to quickly recover after blocking a shot and produce their own quick counterattacks because of its enhanced ability to change direction. This type of rubber is extremely useful for offensive players since it increases the amount of spin they can put on a ball, or to neutralize their opponent's ability to produce heavy backspin.
Ok.
 

jasmy84

Cricket Spectator
Current after some light weight Attack rubber.

I have noticed that the Dignics are fairly light and also the Victas 11 Extra.

Anyone know of any attack rubber thats under 50g after cut?

My current rubbers are Mizuno GF Pro & Nittaku Fastarc P-1 (This one is real heavy however is a super good rubber... MY Previous rubber was Rasanter v47 which was fairly light) My bat weight is now 189g and I find it extremely heavy and unbearable .... the blade that I really like and intend to get is Innerforce ALC (Which is impossible to find one under 88g with FL handle - Currently using Mizutani ZLC)

Any recommendation appreciated, play style = similar to Nagasaki Miyuu with lots of back hand and forehand mainly to lift up ball or obvious easy shots, so back hand can start fast rally and attack.

Thank you.
 

Shady Slim

Cricketer Of The Year
last year we invested in a table tennis set for work and it's really good

we've got a perfect table in the meeting room that's almost the perfect dimensions and it makes a quiet arvo a lot of fun and would recommend
 

Heboric

International Debutant
Yeah at the bar/canteen area of my work had a ping-pong table. Lots of fun on a Friday afternoon
 

HeathDavisSpeed

Hall of Fame Member
Could we call it table tennis? This thread title reminds me of one of the most annoying pop songs of all time.

It is an enjoyable game. A previous workplace of mine had table tennis and darts in the staff canteen. Good times for an afternoon break from work.
 

BoyBrumby

Englishman
Does my ping pong need rubber or not?
Think this bot has accidentally created one of the ATG euphemisms. "Missus is coming off the pill so had to rubber the old ping pong."

Could we call it table tennis? This thread title reminds me of one of the most annoying pop songs of all time.

It is an enjoyable game. A previous workplace of mine had table tennis and darts in the staff canteen. Good times for an afternoon break from work.
Isn't ping pong a variation of table tennis now?

I always thought they were the same thing, but pretty sure there's some minor differences in ball size or bat shape?
 

jasmy84

Cricket Spectator
Think this bot has accidentally created one of the ATG euphemisms. "Missus is coming off the pill so had to rubber the old ping pong."



Isn't ping pong a variation of table tennis now?

I always thought they were the same thing, but pretty sure there's some minor differences in ball size or bat shape?

There has been much debate about the difference between ping pong and table tennis, with the common assumption being that they are the same thing. Here, we explain the differences:

• The surface of the bats - While the sides of a table tennis bat consist of rubber and a sponge, the sides of a ping pong bat are made up of sandpaper. Essentially, this means that the ping pong rallies are longer and involve more craft and skill as the bats aren’t able to generate as much power or spin.

• At the end of each leg (first to 11 or 15 points depending on tournament format) players change ends and exchange bats, meaning no advantage can be had from the equipment, unlike in table tennis where players can pick and choose different types of rubber surface to suit their game.

• Like table tennis, a best of five legs scoring system is also in place with service changing every two points. However, in Ping Pong each player gets one ‘double point ball’ in each match. They can elect to use this whenever they like provided they’re on serve - making things even more interesting and exciting!
 

kilansri

Cricket Spectator
The rubber you should use really depends on your current ability and what you feel you should be using. It's difficult for me to keep up with all the different rubbers when there are thousands of choices out there. The three rubbers I can recommend. Mark V is an excellent rubber and is ideal for players who like control. If you want something a bit faster, you can try Yasaka Pryde. And if you are after something really fast, check out the Xiom Vega Pro. It is imperative to develop your strokes before moving to something too quick if you don't have a lot of consistency.
 

Daemon

Request Your Custom Title Now!
Thanks man. I'm not after anything fast, the idea is for the rubber to make me last long enough to develop my strokes. Could you also recommend one that doesn't keep falling off because it's too big?
 

Top