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Thread: Interesting Cricket/cricketers' Stories !!

  1. #16
    Eyes not spreadsheets marc71178's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BoyBrumby
    For the record Warnie has nicknamed KP "600" cos he's got him marked down as his 600th test wicket!
    Suits me since I don't think he'll get a game in the Ashes...
    marc71178 - President and founding member of AAAS - we don't only appreciate when he does well, but also when he's not quite so good!

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  2. #17
    Englishman BoyBrumby's Avatar
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    I think this qualifies as "interesting". The Nawab of Pataudi junior has been arrested for poaching & faces lengthy jail term if convicted! From cricinfo:

    http://content.cricinfo.com/india/co...ry/210591.html
    Cricket Web's 2013/14 Premier League Tipping Champion

    - As featured in The Independent.

    "I don't believe a word of Pietersen's book, but then I don't believe a word anyone else has said either."
    - Simon Barnes renders further comment on KP's autobiography superfluous in a sentence

  3. #18
    International Regular harsh.ag's Avatar
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    Latest rice-pudding man

    by Neville Cardus
    Friday January 24, 1975

    It is easy to imagine, from the reports of the Test matches in Australia, that the fast, short-pitched, rising ball bowled by Thomson and Lillee is a newly-invented menace to the physical well-being of batsmen. Indeed, I expect to read, or hear, any moment a statement from some sociologist informing us that the fast bouncer and Thomson and Lillee are by-products of the present-day revival of violence everywhere, letter-bombs, bombs, hijacking, etc. Our sociologist could argue that Thomson and Lillee are hijackers, saying to the batsmen: "Surrender to us your wicket, or we'll put you in hospital."

    Alas, there is nothing new under the sun, or the moon. The fast bouncer has like the poor and the jokes of BBC comedians, always been with us. When I was a small boy I saw the Australian bowler Cotter attacking England's batsmen at Old Trafford. I was terrified, mainly because I feared he might hurt my favorite cricketer, R. H. Spooner. In his first over two balls catapulted high above the head of the Australian wicket-keeper.

    At Trent Bridge, in this same rubber of 1905, Cotter blasted his way through the England first innings, bombing Hayward, John Gunn and the usually imperturbable F. S. Jackson. John Gunn told me years afterwards, that at the outset of England's second innings, A. C. MacLaren was seen pacing up and down the dressing-room, padded-up, and muttering to himself: "I'll bloody well Cotter him." And MacLaren scored 140, dismissing Cotter's bouncers contemptuously from his presence.

    But we need not go as far back as 1905 to seek out the advent of the fast bowler's bouncer, called bumpers then. Only yester-year the West Indians, Hall and Griffith, menaced cranium and thorax; Hall broke the left wrist of Cowdrey at Lord's in 1963 - and Dexter put Hall to the sword with the high disdain of MacLaren. Have the cricket reporters in Australia forgotten Gregory and Macdonald bowling ferocious bouncers in Armstrong's Australian team of 1921?

    At Trent Bridge, Gregory with a bouncer knocked out Ernest Tyldesley, the ball hitting his head then falling on the stumps. After the match I saw Ernest Tyldesley's more famous brother J. T. Tyldesley, and I expressed to him my sympathy with Ernest in his bad luck at Trent Bridge. But J. T. was not at all sympathetic. "He was trying to hook and ran into the ball. When a batsman tries to hook he should move over to the offside, then if the ball is not at the right height to hook, he leaves it alone, and the ball passes harmlessly over his left shoulder."

    At Leeds, in 1921, the Hon. Lionel Tennyson, with a split hand, assaulted Gregory violently. Stanley McCabe coped triumphantly even with Larwood's nuclear attack, the so-called "body-line", in Australia. We can sum up the contemporary England batsmen's fearsome notion of the bouncer, a general idea that a bouncer is not quite cricket, by pointing out that one of the great strokes in all the batsman's repertory is the hook. And the hook could not have been invented and perfected, except against the short-pitched bouncer.

    In a Lancashire v. Nottinghamshire match at Old Trafford, in the late twenties, Larwood was bouncing them. He was horrifically explosive. At the close of Lancashire's innings, E. A. Macdonald, Lancashire's imported and most stylish - and fast and most dangerous of fast bowlers to batsmen's anatomy - went into the Notts' players" dressing-room, advising them to ring up the nearest infirmary for an ambulance. "I'll show you," he threatened, "what a fast bumper really is." And he did. Whysall was hurt and obliged to leave the field. George Gunn walked out of his crease to Macdonald"s fastest. A bouncer came to him on the offside; he actually cut under the ball, sending it over third-man's head, high over, for six. Macdonald stopped in his run to bowl as he saw George walking towards him, out of his crease. "Get back, George," commanded Macdonald, "or I'll knock your head off." George replied to the fastest of fast bowlers, "Ted, you couldn't knock the skin off a rice pudding."

    Ernest Jones, also Australian, sent a bouncer through the beard of W. G. Grace and was severely reprimanded verbally and by bat. At Old Trafford, in 1896, Ernest Jones bounced at fierce and lightning pace - and Ranjitsinhji scored 154, not out. In his retirement, Ranjitsinhji told me that one ball from Jones grazed his left ear, drawing blood. "I mistimed; I don't think I was seeing the ball very well that day."

    As Compton remarked, over the radio the other day, the bouncer can be more or less controlled, given the technique. English batsmen, in recent years, have had little opportunity to practise against really fast stuff.

    One of the most brightening exhibitions of fast bouncing bowling I have ever seen occurred at Old Trafford in 1948 during the England v. Australia Test match. Lindwall was awesome. He almost paralysed Compton's left arm, then, with a "no-ball" so much over the crease that he let the ball go its vicious way far down the pitch, he struck Compton's forehead as in fact Compton actually tried to hook (no running away!) and the missile flew off the edge of his bat. Compton staggered and was led from the field, his forehead bleeding. Stitches were sewn into the wound. He wanted to resume his innings but was advised by a doctor to rest awhile. Edrich (Bill), held the fort bravely, even as his kinsman did at Sydney the other week.

    Compton - believe it or not - went to a net to find out if he could still see a quick ball, then resumed his Test match innings, stayed until close of play, and next morning carried his score to 145 not out. As Wisden recorded, Lindwall bowled bouncers with such force and dangerous aim that during this season of 1948 he knocked-out or hurt Compton, Todd, Washbrook (a great hooker), Keeton, Robertson and Watkins.

    Bouncers of real pace are obviously not liked by ordinarily batsmen. But if bouncers are ever made illegal one of the imperial strokes will depart from batsmanship, much to the disappointment of the shades of A. C. MacLaren, Trumper, Jessop, Hendreff and Hammond (who, in his early years, was a powerful and noble hooker). I am pretty sure that one or two batsmen still with us would be eager to tackle the short clanging bouncers of Thomson - Barry Richards, for instance, Clive Lloyd and, maybe, Greg Chappell.
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  4. #19
    International Regular harsh.ag's Avatar
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    On Harold Larwood - A Collection of Tales

    The ball that hit Oldfield started verything off. Not a recognised batsman, Oldfield had reached 40 with a leg glance off Larwood that went for 4, so Larwood dropped the next one short. Attempting to hook it, Oldfield mistimed it and was struck on the right side of the temple. All hell broke loose. Larwood, frightened that the injury might be serious, ran up to the crumpled figure. 'I'm sorry, Bertie,' he said. The plucky little wicket-keeper tried to collect himself and mumbled: 'It's not your fault, Harold.' An X-ray later revealed that Oldfield had suffered a fractured skull.

    The crowd's anger exploded. 'Go home, you Pommie bastards!' they yelled as Woodfull assisted Oldfield from the field. The match continued amid a storm of barracking and abuse.

    At the end of the day's play, police protection was offered to Larwood but big Bill Voce told them: 'Don't worry, we'll look after him.'

    ------------------------------------------------------------------

    'On the last day but one of the Test(Adelaide Test of Bodyline series), Larwood received a telegram from Archie Jackson as he lay dying from a chest complaint in a Brisbane private hospital: 'Congratulations - magnificent bowling. Good luck - all matches, Archie Jackson.' This was the same Archie Jackson, acknowledged in Australia as the greatest master batsman since Trumper, who had taken a bruising and stood up to Harold's bowling on a rain-affected pitch at the Oval in 1930.

    -------------------------------------------------------------

    'The Sydney Cricket Ground was packed to capacity for the last Test and after nearly two days in the field England finally dismissed Australia on a fast wicket. Though Larwood had sweated to take 4 for 98 off 32 overs Jardine asked him to bat as night watchman. 'This isn't fair,' Larwood objected. Jardine insisted and the fast bowler went out to bat in a temper, survived until the next day, then batted on spleen, attacking the bowling with gusto. Fast bowler Bull Alexander kept bumping them down at him while the 'Hill' egged him on: 'Knock his bloody head off, Bull!' One ball grazed his nose and when a fielder remarked that it was a close one, Larwood casually replied: 'Not really, I had time to count
    its stitches.' After scoring 98, including a 6, a 5 and nine 4's, the spectators, including all of the 'Hill', stood and cheered him off. The Australians may be good barrackers but they do appreciate good cricket. Larwood later learned that Jardine wanted him to bat early in order to give him a good rest before bowling. He just didn't explain it to Harold.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------
    'I'll tell you about that 'Silent Killer' nickname I gave him. I used to field at cover point and as Loll came up on that smooth, carpet-slipper run of his, and I moved in to the batsmen I used to listen hard - to find out what kind of delivery he was going to bowl. If I could hear his feet tip-tapping over the turf I knew he would be well within himself - he would still be quick, mind. But when I couldn't hear him running up I used to look at the batsman and think: 'You're a split second away from trouble, son,' because I knew that Loll was coming in on his toes and he was going to let slip the fastest he'd got.'

    Joe Hardstaff Jnr. - Notts. and England

    -------------------------------------------------------------

    When Leicester take the field against Notts, Harry Smith likes the look of the wicket and tells his skipper: 'S-s-skipper, I think I'll b-b-bounce one or two.' Harry had a bit of a stutter. 'Wait a minute,' says the captain, 'they've got Larwood and Voce.'

    'I'll just b-b-bounce one or two,' says Harry. So he bounces one or two and Notts don't like it. Before the end of the day, Leicester go in to bat and Larwood and Voce bowl them over like tin soldiers. Harry soon finds himself at the wicket. Larwood and Voce go for him and he's never seen so many balls bouncing around his ears. Suddenly he gets a touch and Sam Staples catches him at second slip. Harry takes off his gloves and walks. 'Wait a minute,' says Sam, 'it was a bump ball. I didn't catch it!'

    'Yes, you b-b-loody-well did,' says Harry, and he's back in the pavilion before you can say Jack Robinson.
    --------------------------------------------------------

    INTERVIEW

    "At the age of 17, I was promoted to the village's first team. Bowling in sandshoes because I didn't own a pair of boots, I sent down 20 overs during the match, even though I'd worked down the mine all the previous night.'

    'I remember the game as if it were last week. After a few overs my nose began to bleed. Team mates, men they were , urged me to leave the field. I refused and kept on bowling. Down the mine I reamed of cricket; I bowled imaginery balls in the dark; I sent the stumps spinning and heard them rattling in the tunnels. No mishap was going to stop me from bowling in the real game, especially this one.'

    'My nose bled worse than ever, spattering my shirt. I was again advised to go off but I continued to bowl. Then a ball caught the middle stump. My next delivery scattered the incoming batsman's wicket. Although feeling a bit weak by now I got ready for one more, and hit the off stump. It was my first hat-trick.'

    'Cricket was my reason for living.'


  5. #20
    Request Your Custom Title Now! benchmark00's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jono View Post
    Kohli. Do something in test cricket for once please.

    Thanks.

  6. #21
    International Regular harsh.ag's Avatar
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    When Fielding Won The Matches

    The standing of Australia of 1952/3 was not unlike that of the current Australian team. All the players of the Bradman's team - except the Don himself - were there in the tour to South Africa. They had won 25 out of the 32 tests since 1945. Put to test against them was South Africa. None of Dudley Nourse, Alan Melville, Bruce Mitchell, Eric and Athol Rowan, Tufty Mann or Cuan McCarthy - all good to great players who had served South Africa before and after the war - were to able to make the tour. Indeed, there was major campaign lead by the Louis Duffus, the most eminent among South African cricket writers, that the tour should be cancelled to avoid further defeats and humiliations.

    It was well justified. Australia had butchered a much stronger South African team in 1949-50 by four tests to nothing. The last test was lost by an innings and 259 runs, the biggest in SAF history. In the absence of all the major players Jack Cheetham was chosen to lead the team. An slow, stodgy batsman, he had averaged 18.76 in his 9 tests. Going into the series, the career averages of the other players, some of whom were to destined to become great, read thus : In batting McGlew had made 50 runs at 12.50, Waite 152 at 21.71, Endean 38 at 19.00, McLean 138 at 27.60 and Watkins 87 at 14.50. As for bowling Watkins had 3 wkts at 48.00, Melle 12 at 26.66 and Tayfield 17 at 42.70.

    This was the team that was to face the Australians among whom were Arthur Morris, Neil Harvey, Colin Macdonald, Lindsay Hassett, Miller, Lindwall, Benaud, Bill Johnston and Ian Johnson.

    Cheetham conceded quite early that it would be pointless to try and match the Australians in batting or bowling. So with the aid of his manager Ken Viljoen, he did an informal study on how often were test hundreds chanceless and the answer he received was 'precious few'. That was to be his solution to the Australian question. Cheetham drove his team to intense fielding practices, which started from South Africa and continued through the voyage to Australia. During the long trip, he preached to the diffident players like Tayfield, how good they really were.

    South African team was completely written in the early stages of the tour. They lost to New South Wales, and the intense practice actually seemed to increase the number of catches dropped. Everything was going according to the script when Australia won the first test at Sydney.

    Then the efforts began to pay off. If there is any single moment which could be pointed out as the beginning of the end for that great Australian team, it would be the second day of the Melbourne test. South Africa made 227 and Australian openers had made nearly 100 when Arthur Morris drove Tayfield into the body of Cheetham at silly point from where it bounced over the head of the bowler. Tayfield turned around, raced after the ball and caught it with a full length drive.

    This was made to look like a commonplace thing when Russell Endean caught Miller at the long on boundary. RS Whittington has written how he was looking into the crowd to see someone among them catch the ball. For a few moments nothing happened. Then he saw Endean stand with his back to the rails like a 'miniature Statue of Liberty'. Miller remembered that catch in a recent memoir :

    "Endean...what a catch that was, one-handed and jumping up right next to the picket fence. When I hit it, I knew it was going over. How Endean kept his feet I'll never know as in those days the ground sloped down in the last five or six yards. I thought he was going to go !@#$ over @#$. It was just the mightiest catch. I still remember it clearly all these years on."

    On that fateful day, four 'impossible' catches were held. Australia was held to 243. Then, maybe not as a coincidence, Endean who had been considered as another ordinary batsman, played the innings of his life. His 162* left Australia to chase 373. Tayfield took 7 wickets and Australia was brought down by 82 runs.

    Australia went ahead winning the third test and it came down to final test at Melbourne. Harvey's 205 helped Australia to 520 and South Africa conceded a lead of 85 and were then set 295 to win. When Roy Maclean went out to bat at 191 for 4, Cheetham told him, 'score quickly, but don't take any risks'. 'Don't worry Pop, I'll get 'em for you', came the reply. Maclean was dropped first ball, then scored 76 in 80 minutes and the series was tied.

    The historical significance of this series is immense. This was the first series the Australia had failed to win in 14 years. The next year, they lost the Ashes for the first time in 19 years. South Africa had always been a sort of Zimbabwe till this point. Out of this series they were never underdogs again. Following through from here, Cheetham's team defeated New Zealand 4-0 and came back from two tests down to tie England 2-2 only to lose the last test and series in 1955.

  7. #22
    Cricket Web: All-Time Legend smalishah84's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by harsh.skm View Post
    When Fielding Won The Matches

    The standing of Australia of 1952/3 was not unlike that of the current Australian team. All the players of the Bradman's team - except the Don himself - were there in the tour to South Africa. They had won 25 out of the 32 tests since 1945. Put to test against them was South Africa. None of Dudley Nourse, Alan Melville, Bruce Mitchell, Eric and Athol Rowan, Tufty Mann or Cuan McCarthy - all good to great players who had served South Africa before and after the war - were to able to make the tour. Indeed, there was major campaign lead by the Louis Duffus, the most eminent among South African cricket writers, that the tour should be cancelled to avoid further defeats and humiliations.

    It was well justified. Australia had butchered a much stronger South African team in 1949-50 by four tests to nothing. The last test was lost by an innings and 259 runs, the biggest in SAF history. In the absence of all the major players Jack Cheetham was chosen to lead the team. An slow, stodgy batsman, he had averaged 18.76 in his 9 tests. Going into the series, the career averages of the other players, some of whom were to destined to become great, read thus : In batting McGlew had made 50 runs at 12.50, Waite 152 at 21.71, Endean 38 at 19.00, McLean 138 at 27.60 and Watkins 87 at 14.50. As for bowling Watkins had 3 wkts at 48.00, Melle 12 at 26.66 and Tayfield 17 at 42.70.

    This was the team that was to face the Australians among whom were Arthur Morris, Neil Harvey, Colin Macdonald, Lindsay Hassett, Miller, Lindwall, Benaud, Bill Johnston and Ian Johnson.

    Cheetham conceded quite early that it would be pointless to try and match the Australians in batting or bowling. So with the aid of his manager Ken Viljoen, he did an informal study on how often were test hundreds chanceless and the answer he received was 'precious few'. That was to be his solution to the Australian question. Cheetham drove his team to intense fielding practices, which started from South Africa and continued through the voyage to Australia. During the long trip, he preached to the diffident players like Tayfield, how good they really were.

    South African team was completely written in the early stages of the tour. They lost to New South Wales, and the intense practice actually seemed to increase the number of catches dropped. Everything was going according to the script when Australia won the first test at Sydney.

    Then the efforts began to pay off. If there is any single moment which could be pointed out as the beginning of the end for that great Australian team, it would be the second day of the Melbourne test. South Africa made 227 and Australian openers had made nearly 100 when Arthur Morris drove Tayfield into the body of Cheetham at silly point from where it bounced over the head of the bowler. Tayfield turned around, raced after the ball and caught it with a full length drive.

    This was made to look like a commonplace thing when Russell Endean caught Miller at the long on boundary. RS Whittington has written how he was looking into the crowd to see someone among them catch the ball. For a few moments nothing happened. Then he saw Endean stand with his back to the rails like a 'miniature Statue of Liberty'. Miller remembered that catch in a recent memoir :

    "Endean...what a catch that was, one-handed and jumping up right next to the picket fence. When I hit it, I knew it was going over. How Endean kept his feet I'll never know as in those days the ground sloped down in the last five or six yards. I thought he was going to go !@#$ over @#$. It was just the mightiest catch. I still remember it clearly all these years on."

    On that fateful day, four 'impossible' catches were held. Australia was held to 243. Then, maybe not as a coincidence, Endean who had been considered as another ordinary batsman, played the innings of his life. His 162* left Australia to chase 373. Tayfield took 7 wickets and Australia was brought down by 82 runs.

    Australia went ahead winning the third test and it came down to final test at Melbourne. Harvey's 205 helped Australia to 520 and South Africa conceded a lead of 85 and were then set 295 to win. When Roy Maclean went out to bat at 191 for 4, Cheetham told him, 'score quickly, but don't take any risks'. 'Don't worry Pop, I'll get 'em for you', came the reply. Maclean was dropped first ball, then scored 76 in 80 minutes and the series was tied.

    The historical significance of this series is immense. This was the first series the Australia had failed to win in 14 years. The next year, they lost the Ashes for the first time in 19 years. South Africa had always been a sort of Zimbabwe till this point. Out of this series they were never underdogs again. Following through from here, Cheetham's team defeated New Zealand 4-0 and came back from two tests down to tie England 2-2 only to lose the last test and series in 1955.
    And smalishah's avatar is the most classy one by far Jan certainly echoes the sentiments of CW

    Yeah we don't crap in the first world; most of us would actually have no idea what that was emanating from Ajmal's backside. Why isn't it roses and rainbows like what happens here? PEWS's retort to Ganeshran on Daemon's picture depicting Ajmal's excreta

  8. #23
    Virat Kohli (c) Jono's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by benchmark00 View Post
    Brett Goodes.

  9. #24
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    Some Don stories who else?

    Bradman had a horror start as captain. He lost the toss at the 'Gabba,
    watched his main strike bowler Ernie McCormick break down and was out
    for a duck in the second innings on a sticky wicket. England romped home by 322 runs and won the second Test in Sydney by an innings, rain once again coming to its aid. Bradman made his second successive duck and the critics were not impressed with the scoreboard - England 2, Australia 0 and in grave danger of losing the Ashes. One ewspaper reported that Bradman, the spotlight now focused on him all the time
    and his anxiety level full to overflowing, was not getting the loyal support of all his players. McCabe issued a statement saying the players were behind him.

    Things turned around for Australia and Bradman in the third Test in Melbourne. With rain a factor for the third time and England batting on a sticky wicket, the shrewd Bradman told his bowlers not to get England out. When Allen declared (too late, as it turned out) towards
    the end of play on Saturday, the wicket was still unfriendly. Bradman gambled and opened the second innings with tail-enders Bill O'Reilly and a stunned `Chuck' Fleetwood-Smith.

    O?Reilly was out first ball, but Fleetwood-Smith survived, joking that he had the game by the throat.

    BY Monday the wicket had lost its fire and, with Bradman back to his fluent best with 270, Australia won. Bradman's improvisation had paid off. This time Allen's captaincy was under fire. He might have clinched the series 3-0 if he had declared England's second innings
    sooner and exposed Australia to the damp wicket. Australia won the next two Tests, the captain contributing 212 and 169, to retain the Ashes 3-2 and Bradman had come through his first baptism of fire with his reputation enhanced.
    -------------------------------------
    In Adelaide against the might of the West Indies Merv Hughes had just completed his highest Test innings of 72 not out, sharing in an 114 run 9th wicket partnership with Dean Jones (216). Hughes was relaxing, towel around his neck, enjoying a cold something and bathing in the kudos of his colleagues for some cavalier, entertaining and ridiculous
    batsmanship. Then The Don entered the room. After congratulating Jones on his strokeplay, Bradman cast an eye at the big, sweaty, moustachioed fast bowler, shook his head and said, "It?s a funny game, cricket."
    ---------------------------------
    Michael Parkinson on Don:

    There is, for instance, the tale of Bill Black, an off-spin bowler playing for Lithgow, who on a memorable day in 1931 bowled Bradman for 52. The umpire was so excited that when the ball hit Bradman's wicket he called out: "Bill, you've got him."

    The ball was mounted and given to Black as proof that he had dismissed
    the greatest batsman in the world.

    Later that season Don Bradman again played against Black. As the bowler marked out his run, Don said to the wicketkeeper: "What sort of bowler is this fellow?"

    The wicketkeeper, a mischief-maker like the rest of his tribe, replied: "Don't you remember this bloke? He bowled you out a few weeks ago and has been boasting about it ever since."

    "Is that so?" said Bradman. Two overs later Black pleaded with his skipper to be taken off. Bradman had hit him for 62 runs in two eight-ball overs. He made 100 in three overs and finished with 256,
    including 14 sixes and 29 fours.

  10. #25
    Hall of Fame Member honestbharani's Avatar
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    yeah.. appropos in light of the nonsense being sprouted on the other thread to have cool Don stories here
    We miss you, Fardin. :(. RIP.
    Quote Originally Posted by vic_orthdox View Post
    In the end, I think it's so utterly, incomprehensibly boring. There is so much context behind each innings of cricket that dissecting statistics into these small samples is just worthless. No-one has ever been faced with the same situation in which they come out to bat as someone else. Ever.
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  11. #26
    Cricket Web Staff Member Burgey's Avatar
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    Several years ago we had a very gifted but somewhat ill-tempered and occasionally lazy cricketer playing for our club. We were batting second in a game and having dismised the opposition cheaply, we were well placed to get a sizeable lead and attempt to win by an innings on day two.

    The aforementioned talented hot-head was 50 not out at drinks and, in an attempt to prove whether an incentive based system ought to be brought into the side rather than the usual punitive fines regime, we told him that if he secured his 100 by hitting nothing but sixes we would in turn secure for him a case of his favourite amber liquid.

    On hearing the incentive deal, he strode to the wicket after the break about 80 metres ahead of his batting partner and took guard with renewed enthusiasm. The enthusiasm continued until he was caught one-handed on the boundary for 98 - his last 48 runs having come in sixes. This was, as you might appreciate, the cause of great mirth to his team mates as we had got to see some great hitting, saved ourselves the cost of a case of beer and had something about which we could genuinely pour **** on him.

    The laughter continued when he walked off the field and proceeded to hurl the bat over the pavilion in disgust, however, the team mate who was laughing loudest ceased to do so when it dawned on him that he had loaned the bloke his bat for the day.

    Good times.
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    #408. Sixty three not out forever.

  12. #27
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    So many age jokes there but I must resist.

  13. #28
    International Regular harsh.ag's Avatar
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    For the fields of Johannesburg
    - Richard Grant

    I was flipping through channels today and came across Sky Sports just as a replay of Kevin Pietersen playing a delightful cut shot came up. The point fielder flew sideways spectacularly but unsuccessfully, and the ball raced off the green to cross the ropes. This replay was a view from the mid-wicket camera. At that moment, for some reason, I was deeply reminded of why I love cricket. It is beautiful.

    For the past few years, I guess that has somehow become lost on me. Perhaps because of a hectic life, perhaps because of no trips to the wanderers in the last 4 years, or perhaps because my favorite players have all retired. I guess all the little things add up so I don't enjoy the sport as I used to earlier.

    That shot, however, brought back some memories of my childhood. I have always been partial to the cut stroke. Playing school cricket in Johannesburg was a delight in the green fields, with us dressed in white, trying to be graceful in stroke play. It was always a challenge to get past the point fielder, and I was caught numerous times by this one fellow who was lightning quick. I have some fond memories of the days the ball went past him on a regular basis.

    There is a part of me which heartily dislikes sloppy or uninspired fielding. It takes all the glory and pride and joy out of batting, out of the process of cricket. That part of me, perhaps, lies in the green fields of Johannesburg.

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by honestbharani View Post
    For the love of God, this is the most twisted reality tale I have ever heard.... And to think that I actually thought that such nonsense only occurs in India.....
    Nothing in this world is new

  15. #30
    International Regular harsh.ag's Avatar
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    An interesting story about a West Indian who averaged more than the Don himself:

    Cricinfo - Andy and the 'Establishment'

    Andy Ganteaume - Profile

    Plus why wasn't Taslim Arif allowed to play for Pakistan purely as a batsman?

    Maybe he wasn't that good a batsman, and was having a lucky streak? Like Ken Higgs perhaps? Or was it something sinister..

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