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How many runs?

rodk

School Boy/Girl Captain
New Zealand vs. Pakistan, ODI. Saw only highlights and did not get details.

The batsman was trying to stretch a single into a double. The outfielder tried to hit the wicket from some distance away but missed and no one was backing up, and the ball ended up over the boundary.

They cut too fast to say how many runs scored on that play. Was it 4 because the play ended with the ball over the rope? Was it six for the two from the double and then 4 for the ball ending up over the rope?

Australia vs. India, also ODI. Also highlight package with insufficient explanation.

Starc bounced a delivery over the batsman's head and it rolled out over the rope. No way to hit it unless the batsman jumped. Is that a wide plus 4 for a boundary plus a no ball?
 
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andmark

International Captain
I'm almost certain it's six runs with, as you say, the two ran and the four overthrows (the term used to describe runs gained from a bad throw). I could speculate that there may be a good reason for this. In some grounds in the past, it wasn't impossible to run five. If a fielder had decided to be a **** and the rules were otherwise, they could just throw it over the boundary for a four instead which would be silly.
 

trundler

Hall of Fame Member
If it's wide then the ball will have to be bowled again and one run will be given to the batting side as is standard practice. 4 runs from the ball going to the once will be on top of that.
 

Bijed

International Debutant
Starc bounced a delivery over the batsman's head and it rolled out over the rope. No way to hit it unless the batsman jumped. Is that a wide plus 4 for a boundary plus a no ball?
The no-ball rule for high deliveries wouldn't apply here - it's only for when the ball goes past the batsman at above waist level without bouncing first. So in this case it'd be 5 runs - 1 for the wide plus 4 for the boundary as you correctly identified.

I don't think you a delivery can be both a wide and a no-ball - I think if you overstep and bowl a wide it gets called the no-ball call* is deemed to override the wide.


*Current state of affairs regarding calling no-balls notwithstanding
 

rodk

School Boy/Girl Captain
What happens if the runner has made his ground before the ball hits the wicket and then gets away? Is the ball live? Can the runners try to score some more? If so, can the fielders try to make another play at the same wicket if that opportunity comes up?
 

Bijed

International Debutant
What happens if the runner has made his ground before the ball hits the wicket and then gets away? Is the ball live? Can the runners try to score some more? If so, can the fielders try to make another play at the same wicket if that opportunity comes up?
Yes to both, though if the bails have already been dislodged then the fielders would have to effect the second run out attempt by pulling a stump out of the ground instead.
 

rodk

School Boy/Girl Captain
Can umpires fix situations that have resulted from bad initial decisions? Say a batsman is given out on a catch but the replay shows the ball has been trapped. Both sides probably stopped playing on the bad initial decision. Does the umpire have the power to award the runs that should have been scored if the play had been correctly decided in the first place?
 

SillyCowCorner1

International Coach
Can umpires fix situations that have resulted from bad initial decisions? Say a batsman is given out on a catch but the replay shows the ball has been trapped. Both sides probably stopped playing on the bad initial decision. Does the umpire have the power to award the runs that should have been scored if the play had been correctly decided in the first place?
Okay, as far as I know, once the batsman has been given out, the ball is dead. The batsmen can't attempt any more runs. They can surely fix this situation by calling on the 3rd umpire to review the catch. If batsmen completed x number of runs before the fielder claimed the catch; and then umpire gives his decision; those x number of runs will be valid; not any runs after the fact; because play was halted to question the Umpire's decision.
 

rodk

School Boy/Girl Captain
Is there a run penalty on the fielding team if a runner and fielder collide? Would it depend on who ran into whom and what each player was attempting to do at the time? Note: I saw a play in which fielder came in to pick up a grounder and was bumped by the runner as he went for the ball, and somehow the ruling was the collision was the fielder's fault and he was the one to apologize for interference.

Are there other applicable penalties to this situation, such as red and yellow cards?
 
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SillyCowCorner1

International Coach
Is there a run penalty on the fielding team if a runner and fielder collide? Would it depend on who ran into whom and what each player was attempting to do at the time? Note: I saw a play in which fielder came in to pick up a grounder and was bumped by the runner as he went for the ball, and somehow the ruling was the collision was the fielder's fault.

Are there other applicable penalties to this situation, such as red and yellow cards?
Simple answer: look at the first test match of the ongoing series between Bangladesh and windies. Shannon Gabriel and kayes.

No run penalty. But a suspension for the instigator; Shannon Gabriel in this case.

Cricket's not a contact sport.

See: handled ball & hit ball twice dismissals
 

rodk

School Boy/Girl Captain
Olay cool.

Have you looked up the two forms of dismissals I just mentioned?

Handled ball
Hit ball twice
Yes -- by watching the Stephen Fry videos prepared by MCC. Which even he admits are as clear as mud. From what I gather "handled ball" isn't a rule any more having been subsumed by a broader obstruction rule.

Neither answered the question about collisions between players on each side. As best I recall, the batsman simply blind sided a fielder trying to pick up a grounder, and somehow it was the fielder's fault, leaving open the issue of how that got fixed.
 

SillyCowCorner1

International Coach
Yes -- by watching the Stephen Fry videos prepared by MCC. Which even he admits are as clear as mud. From what I gather "handled ball" isn't a rule any more having been subsumed by a broader obstruction rule.

Neither answered the question about collisions between players on each side. As best I recall, the batsman simply blind sided a fielder trying to pick up a grounder, and somehow it was the fielder's fault, leaving open the issue of how that got fixed.
Those two and this example are what I grouped into a play called: obstructing the field.

I still appreciated hit ball twice though.
 

Tom Flint

International 12th Man
On a pitch with small boundaries behind the bowlers arm and behind the keeper, what would be signalled if a bouncer was bowled and the ball went over the boundary without bouncing before the rope. Would it be 4 or 6 byes? Assuming it didnt go past the batsman over head height.
 

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