• Welcome to the Cricket Web forums, one of the biggest forums in the world dedicated to cricket.

    You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join the Cricket Web community today!

    If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.

Who Is Martin Crowe ?

The Reason Behind Martin Crow's Accusation of Murali !


  • Total voters
    29
  • Poll closed .

16 tins of Spam

International Vice-Captain
It may or may not be a co incidence, but nearly all the cricketers who have complained about Murali’s action have been white. It is strange that perhaps except for Bishen Bedi from India, to my knowledge, no non white cricketer has made any complaints against Murali. It is also strange that no white bowlers actions have even been as scrutinized as have been that of Murali and some other non white cricketers. This is as if to say that all white bowlers bowl with perfect actions and that only non white bowlers have problems with theirs. Bringing a racist under tone to the Murali controversy is not a pleasant thing, but it has to be said considering how isolated white bowlers have been from controversy and how involved non white bowlers have been in controversy. It simply cannot be logical to say the colour of the skin has something to do with a legal and an illegal bowling action, But that’s what is evident considering the fact that white bowlers have been immune from any other cricketer accusing them of bowling illegal balls and being constantly scrutinized as have been non white bowlers. Surely all these cricketers are human beings with red blood aren’t they?
The article is fair enough, aside from the bit I've quoted. What pointless bile. The salient point seems to be that people with white skin cannot criticise people with coloured skin.

According to this Wikipedia entry, the split between white/non-white players called or reported for throwing throughout international cricket history is roughly even.
 

social

Hall of Fame Member
The article is fair enough, aside from the bit I've quoted. What pointless bile. The salient point seems to be that people with white skin cannot criticise people with coloured skin.

According to this Wikipedia entry, the split between white/non-white players called or reported for throwing throughout international cricket history is roughly even.
Careers ended

White - Geoff Giffen, Ian Meckif

Coloured - zero

The salient point regarding Meckiff and Giffen is that they were drummed out of the game by their own country

Bit different to attitudes these days
 

Butterteeth

School Boy/Girl Cricketer
Why can't Murali being reported end as it does with most other bowlers...a test and then everyone getting on with it. He's unfortunate to have an action that looks wierd...I can't believe anyone would be surprised that he was initially called. He's been tested, but that doesn't mean he may occasionally lapse (as with any other bowler who sails relatively close to the line). If there's concern, test him again and lets get on with it.
You've hit the nail on the head I reckon.

Hear Hear...(clap, clap, chink, chink..) :cheers:
 

JASON

Cricketer Of The Year
Careers ended

White - Geoff Giffen, Ian Meckif

Coloured - zero
The salient point regarding Meckiff and Giffen is that they were drummed out of the game by their own country

Bit different to attitudes these days
You have not heard of Aboriginal fast bowler Eddie Gilbert then...Was considered by none lesser than Bradman to be fiercely fast - Career ended - Died in Mental Asylum, very poor.

http://content-nz.cricinfo.com/australia/content/player/5387.html
 
Last edited:

JASON

Cricketer Of The Year
Eddie Gilbert, who was the best remembered aboriginal cricketer to play first- class cricket in Australia, had been long absent from the scene of his sometimes sensational fast bowling feats of the 1930s and in ill health for many years before his death in the Wolston Park Hospital near Brisbane on January 9, 1978, aged 69. Nevertheless, this notably quiet but well spoken product of Queensland's Cherbourg Aboriginal Settlement has remained a legend down through the years. After successfully graduating through the Queensland Colts XI in 1930, Eddie Gilbert quickly reached the headlines in the 1931 Sheffield Shield match against NSW in Brisbane by his first over dismissals of Wendell Bill and Bradman without scoring. Both were caught by wicketkeeper Len Waterman within seven deliveries, but not before one ball rising from a green top had flicked off Sir Donald's cap and another knocked the bat from his hands! Sir Donald has since recalled that the six deliveries he faced on this occasion were the fastest experienced during his career. Lightly built and only a little over 5ft. 7in. in height, Gilbert possessed exceptionally long arms and could bowl at great pace off a run sometimes no longer than four paces. It was this, allied with a somewhat whippy forearm action, which led to suggestions that his right arm bent on occasions during a pronounced arc action which finished with his hand almost touching the ground and his head at knee level. Strong advocacy for Gilbert's Test selection was nullified by the suspect action, a view several times shared and acted on by senior umpires. Nevertheless, the same officials completely accepted his delivery on most other occasions. Several films were taken without conclusive decision and controversy continued throughout Gilbert's career which was undoubtedly affected by the publicity. He faded out of the game in 1936 after showing fine form while taking six wickets in his final match - against Victoria at the Brisbane Cricket Ground in 1936. In 19 Shield matches, he took 73 wickets at an average of 29.75, while a further 14 wickets were gained in Queensland matches against touring MCC, West Indies and South African sides
 

social

Hall of Fame Member
Eddie Gilbert, who was the best remembered aboriginal cricketer to play first- class cricket in Australia, had been long absent from the scene of his sometimes sensational fast bowling feats of the 1930s and in ill health for many years before his death in the Wolston Park Hospital near Brisbane on January 9, 1978, aged 69. Nevertheless, this notably quiet but well spoken product of Queensland's Cherbourg Aboriginal Settlement has remained a legend down through the years. After successfully graduating through the Queensland Colts XI in 1930, Eddie Gilbert quickly reached the headlines in the 1931 Sheffield Shield match against NSW in Brisbane by his first over dismissals of Wendell Bill and Bradman without scoring. Both were caught by wicketkeeper Len Waterman within seven deliveries, but not before one ball rising from a green top had flicked off Sir Donald's cap and another knocked the bat from his hands! Sir Donald has since recalled that the six deliveries he faced on this occasion were the fastest experienced during his career. Lightly built and only a little over 5ft. 7in. in height, Gilbert possessed exceptionally long arms and could bowl at great pace off a run sometimes no longer than four paces. It was this, allied with a somewhat whippy forearm action, which led to suggestions that his right arm bent on occasions during a pronounced arc action which finished with his hand almost touching the ground and his head at knee level. Strong advocacy for Gilbert's Test selection was nullified by the suspect action, a view several times shared and acted on by senior umpires. Nevertheless, the same officials completely accepted his delivery on most other occasions. Several films were taken without conclusive decision and controversy continued throughout Gilbert's career which was undoubtedly affected by the publicity. He faded out of the game in 1936 after showing fine form while taking six wickets in his final match - against Victoria at the Brisbane Cricket Ground in 1936. In 19 Shield matches, he took 73 wickets at an average of 29.75, while a further 14 wickets were gained in Queensland matches against touring MCC, West Indies and South African sides
No-balled in one match and continued to play for some time afterwards

Non-selection was due to poor stamina not action
 

JASON

Cricketer Of The Year
No-balled in one match and continued to play for some time afterwards

Non-selection was due to poor stamina not action
I wish to highlight from the second article -

The NSW players were unhappy with Gilbert's action, but kept their views to themselves. Al Rose, the team's manager, had no such reservations and told the press at the end of the match that Gilbert was a chucker. Bradman himself later recalled that Gilbert "jerked the ball ... and it was very hard that way to generate such speed with a legitimate delivery."

Unlike Bradman, Gilbert did not go on to greater fame, partly because of his dubious action, partly because of discrimination. In 1930-31, his debut season, Frank Gough, his Queensland captain, refused to travel if Gilbert accompanied the team. Other team-mates refused to speak to him or tried to run him out. "It's all right to be a hero on the field," he once said, "but a black man can be lonely when he is not accepted after the game." He was repeatedly no-balled for throwing - 13 times in one match at Melbourne in 1931-32 - and slipped into obscurity and a life of alcoholism and mental illness.
 

social

Hall of Fame Member
Wikpedia's (the font of all knowledge) view

"It is politically correct revisionism to suggest Racial discrimination played a part in his non-selection into the national team. Doubts over his bowling action may have played a part but in reality he lacked stamina and the heart to overcome unfavourable conditions. There were simply better bowlers available."

BTW, for someone so quick, it's amazing that the keeper stood back, say, 15 yards

As usual, the old-timers have grossly exaggerated and the chances are that he was little above medium pace
 

legglancer12

School Boy/Girl Captain
Wikpedia's (the font of all knowledge) view

"It is politically correct revisionism to suggest Racial discrimination played a part in his non-selection into the national team. Doubts over his bowling action may have played a part but in reality he lacked stamina and the heart to overcome unfavourable conditions. There were simply better bowlers available."

BTW, for someone so quick, it's amazing that the keeper stood back, say, 15 yards

As usual, the old-timers have grossly exaggerated and the chances are that he was little above medium pace
"Unlike Bradman, Gilbert did not go on to greater fame, partly because of his dubious action, partly because of discrimination. In 1930-31, his debut season, Frank Gough, his Queensland captain, refused to travel if Gilbert accompanied the team. Other team-mates refused to speak to him or tried to run him out. "It's all right to be a hero on the field," he once said, "but a black man can be lonely when he is not accepted after the game." He was repeatedly no-balled for throwing - 13 times in one match at Melbourne in 1931-32 - and slipped into obscurity and a life of alcoholism and mental illness"
 

Top