• Welcome to the Cricket Web forums, one of the biggest forums in the world dedicated to cricket.

    You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join the Cricket Web community today!

    If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.

The Official Food/Cooking/Eating thread

zorax

likes this
I think I may actually be getting on board with what Zorax has been saying. While you Indians are posting/discussing beautiful food like this.........the Westerners are talking about chips and ****ing gravy.
Yes exactly

Reading this chip and gravy talk makes me feel so sorry for all the brits on this forum. I almost feel bad that your cricket team is gonna get destroyed in India too. Like, when we lose, atleast our comfort food is pretty amazing. What do you all have left to console yourselves?
 

Daemon

Request Your Custom Title Now!
Speaking of parathas the frozen ones we get here are some of the best I've ever had. Sounds crazy but they're amazing.

The local south indians here also do 'prata' which is fluffy, crisp and a bit chewy inside. You can get them to put eggs, cheese, onions, mushrooms, chicken, etc if you want as well. It's great. Not sure what they call it in India or if they even have it there.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roti_prata
 

vcs

Request Your Custom Title Now!
Mallu food is the best cuisine.

They have a variation of a naan/paratha called the Kerala Parotta which has to be the best indian bread variant by far. Canteen in college was a run by a mallu dude and to this day having naan when I go out for dinner feels like such a huge downgrade. It's lighter than a naan, fluffier and goes so much better with spicy meat curries.

Pic:


Also love the beef cutlets, beef fry and prawn fry you get in Kerala. Just an all round fantastic place for non-vegetarian food.

A colleague from Lucknow also got a ****lead of homemade seekh kababs coming back from home today which were incredible. Stuff like kebabs are 100x better when they're made at home.
Can confirm, Parotta is the best and naan is a downgrade. Though Parotta isn't lighter than a naan, since it has more fat, it's definitely fluffier, and the best thing with meat curries.
Bollocks, South Indian "parottas" are made out of refined flour and aren't a patch on the real ones you get up north. Unless you've had a proper paratha dripping with butter at a dhaba, you ain't had ****.

 

zorax

likes this
I definitely prefer the fluffier, more absorbent styles of parathas to the flatter, harder ones with any curry or sabzi. But for breakfast, flat, thick parathas with yoghurt can't be beat.

One style of Indian food being overlooked atm is Rajasthani food.

I present to you: Dal Bhati Churma




Churma = shredded rotis with ghee and sugar. The dal is thick and spicy, the bhatis are hard on the outside but soft and fluffy and absorbent on the inside, and they both also contain a lot of ghee.


Rajasthani Thalis are also fantastic, if a bit heavy. A lot of the food is basically flour, ghee, lentils, chilies and spices all combined in a variety of ways. Occasionally you'll have some vegetables in there. And you can get meat too.

 

indiaholic

International Captain
Bollocks, South Indian "parottas" are made out of refined flour and aren't a patch on the real ones you get up north. Unless you've had a proper paratha dripping with butter at a dhaba, you ain't had ****.

Compare the south indian parotta to a naan. You obviously cant have aloo paratha with meat dishes. And yeah i agree that aloo parathas are the greatest.
 

vcs

Request Your Custom Title Now!
I definitely prefer the fluffier, more absorbent styles of parathas to the flatter, harder ones with any curry or sabzi. But for breakfast, flat, thick parathas with yoghurt can't be beat.

One style of Indian food being overlooked atm is Rajasthani food.

I present to you: Dal Bhati Churma




Churma = shredded rotis with ghee and sugar. The dal is thick and spicy, the bhatis are hard on the outside but soft and fluffy and absorbent on the inside, and they both also contain a lot of ghee.


Rajasthani Thalis are also fantastic, if a bit heavy. A lot of the food is basically flour, ghee, lentils, chilies and spices all combined in a variety of ways. Occasionally you'll have some vegetables in there. And you can get meat too.

They are the spicier version of Gujju thalis, which are the greatest thing in the known universe.
 

vcs

Request Your Custom Title Now!
Compare the south indian parotta to a naan. You obviously cant have aloo paratha with meat dishes. And yeah i agree that aloo parathas are the greatest.
I've never been overly fond of naan. Those parottas are more like the laccha paratha type breads you get in North Indian restaurants. I just don't like breads made out of refined flour.
 

zorax

likes this
Man so if we were to broadly classify Indian food into categories, how would it go?


- Punjabi
- Gujurati
- Rajasthani
- South India with Portugese Influence
- Classical South Indian
- Mallu
- Sindhi
- Muslim (Haleem and Biryanis and stuff)
- Bengali

I'm sure there is a lot more. And I'm not sure where the typical Indian Restaurant kinda food comes from - the butter chicken, palak paneer, chicken kadai, daals, naans, etc.
 

indiaholic

International Captain
I've never been overly fond of naan. Those parottas are more like the laccha paratha type breads you get in North Indian restaurants. I just don't like breads made out of refined flour.
Agreed. I always prefer rice to anything made out of refined flour. Thing is some of these south Indian dishes just don't go very well with rotis and sometimes people want something other than rice.. Parotta is probably that compromise.
 

hendrix

Hall of Fame Member
I definitely prefer the fluffier, more absorbent styles of parathas to the flatter, harder ones with any curry or sabzi. But for breakfast, flat, thick parathas with yoghurt can't be beat.

One style of Indian food being overlooked atm is Rajasthani food.

I present to you: Dal Bhati Churma


Churma = shredded rotis with ghee and sugar. The dal is thick and spicy, the bhatis are hard on the outside but soft and fluffy and absorbent on the inside, and they both also contain a lot of ghee.


Rajasthani Thalis are also fantastic, if a bit heavy. A lot of the food is basically flour, ghee, lentils, chilies and spices all combined in a variety of ways. Occasionally you'll have some vegetables in there. And you can get meat too.
You can get vegetable ghee and make it vegan bro. It works.

Also try coconut and/or soy yoghurt. Doesn't quite taste the same but can do a job.
 

hendrix

Hall of Fame Member
If any of you guys are in wellington and want to try just how well the meat and dairy substitutes can work these days, I highly recommend Aunty Mena's Vegetarian cafe. Have the Roti Chanai; you won't even know it's not chicken.
 

vcs

Request Your Custom Title Now!
Man so if we were to broadly classify Indian food into categories, how would it go?


- Punjabi
- Gujurati
- Rajasthani
- South India with Portugese Influence
- Classical South Indian
- Mallu
- Sindhi
- Muslim (Haleem and Biryanis and stuff)
- Bengali

I'm sure there is a lot more. And I'm not sure where the typical Indian Restaurant kinda food comes from - the butter chicken, palak paneer, chicken kadai, daals, naans, etc.
Doesn't that all come under the general umbrella of "Mughlai cuisine"?
 

Teja.

Global Moderator
Zorax, I like you but you're killing me with your categorisation of South Indian food. Will expand after work.
 

indiaholic

International Captain
The best way to defeat the English is to have a match at Hyderabad and then serve them a traditional Andhra thali. Not the Mughlai cuisine but the food from Rayalaseema etc.. Some of the fieriest food ever.
 

Shri

Cricket Web: All-Time Legend
More food from my part of the country:



Spicy southern mutton meatballs. Goes with pretty much anything.
 

Top