• Welcome to the Cricket Web forums, one of the biggest forums in the world dedicated to cricket.

    You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join the Cricket Web community today!

    If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.

The British Politics Thread

wpdavid

International Coach
Yeah, our university admissions are actually pretty high tbh (and I gather they are across the sector).

Despite the fact that a lot of it will be distance (or rather "blended") learning, and this not being the preference of the majority of people, the idea of deferring for the sake of having a gap year or travelling, or working, is not very appealing. Because the former will likely be terrible, and there the job market is not exactly great at the moment.
Most of them won't be allowed to defer. Speaking to a couple of people who work at universities, they can't afford to allow many students to do that this year, and next year there will be a whole new cohort anyway. Maybe those with straight As will be in a stronger bargaining position, but most students will have to take it or leave it.
 

wpdavid

International Coach
My eldest should have been doing her As levels. No idea what the plan is.
Most subjects won't have any reduction in the subject matter that can be examined next year, so hopefully she and the school managed to keep her on top of the content that was delivered from the end of March.

My eldest would have taken his A Levels. He reckons he'll be OK for his required grades for university, but I'm not so sure. Based on what we saw in Scotland, the over-riding aim is to make damned sure that this generation can't possibly benefit even if it means that loads of them are disadvantaged by this year's situation.
 

Lillian Thomson

International Coach
It’s the tip of the proverbial iceberg anyway. There’s little chance of the next school year being uninterrupted. It’s been suggested down here that infant schools are temporarily made into secondary schools with 7 and under staying at home. I’m not a teacher and don’t have school age children so I haven’t studied the full practicalities or implications of various solutions.
 

wpdavid

International Coach
It’s the tip of the proverbial iceberg anyway. There’s little chance of the next school year being uninterrupted. It’s been suggested down here that infant schools are temporarily made into secondary schools with 7 and under staying at home. I’m not a teacher and don’t have school age children so I haven’t studied the full practicalities or implications of various solutions.
Your first point is unquestionably true, and I'm desperately worried about it. As well as being a teacher, I have a daughter going into Year 10. She's not been in school at all since the end of March and she can't really afford to lose any more time, but I have no idea how it will work. Secondary schools are going from having 25% of Y10 and Y12 in school at any given moment to having the whole of Years 7 to 13 in school at the same time. If and when there is a second spike, that can only be changed back again.

And yet this Government refuses to even countenance cutting back the subject matter in qualifications to give these kids a breather. A couple of years ago, we lost a couple of sixth formers who took their own lives because they couldn't handle the stress of A level studies. Clearly the stress is going to be even worse over the next couple of years, but Johnson, Williamson and chums just don't give a damn.
 

flibbertyjibber

Cricket Web: All-Time Legend
Your first point is unquestionably true, and I'm desperately worried about it. As well as being a teacher, I have a daughter going into Year 10. She's not been in school at all since the end of March and she can't really afford to lose any more time, but I have no idea how it will work. Secondary schools are going from having 25% of Y10 and Y12 in school at any given moment to having the whole of Years 7 to 13 in school at the same time. If and when there is a second spike, that can only be changed back again.

And yet this Government refuses to even countenance cutting back the subject matter in qualifications to give these kids a breather. A couple of years ago, we lost a couple of sixth formers who took their own lives because they couldn't handle the stress of A level studies. Clearly the stress is going to be even worse over the next couple of years, but Johnson, Williamson and chums just don't give a damn.
They need to be putting things in place now for a possible 2nd wave, leisure centres and libraries etc... which will be out of use can be used as temporary classrooms. Not ideal but better than having kids at home and not doing the work while they play Football Manager or watch videos of cats on Youtube.
 

Shady Slim

International Regular
Your first point is unquestionably true, and I'm desperately worried about it. As well as being a teacher, I have a daughter going into Year 10. She's not been in school at all since the end of March and she can't really afford to lose any more time, but I have no idea how it will work. Secondary schools are going from having 25% of Y10 and Y12 in school at any given moment to having the whole of Years 7 to 13 in school at the same time. If and when there is a second spike, that can only be changed back again.

And yet this Government refuses to even countenance cutting back the subject matter in qualifications to give these kids a breather. A couple of years ago, we lost a couple of sixth formers who took their own lives because they couldn't handle the stress of A level studies. Clearly the stress is going to be even worse over the next couple of years, but Johnson, Williamson and chums just don't give a damn.
i think this is quite a good thing to talk about and something that hasn't really been a part of the schools opening up discussion - mental health has been on the periphery of the discussion around the lockdowns when they were coming down hard, but specifically a focus on school kids' mental health, which we already know is such a quagmire at the best of times - how they are going to cope with the increased stresses is something that i have really not seen raised by mainstream discourse

yes, ofc, the concern with schools first and foremost is the health concerns and that's a big argument in favour of having them shut or from home - but i don't really think people have been talking about the mental health drain on the kids opening up could lead to, especially given there's so many kids out there who would've already lost grandparents, neighbours, and so on, and still are - and will now have this lumped on top too. these conversations are the ones that aren't permeating the mainstream but we definitely should be having
 

wpdavid

International Coach
i think this is quite a good thing to talk about and something that hasn't really been a part of the schools opening up discussion - mental health has been on the periphery of the discussion around the lockdowns when they were coming down hard, but specifically a focus on school kids' mental health, which we already know is such a quagmire at the best of times - how they are going to cope with the increased stresses is something that i have really not seen raised by mainstream discourse

yes, ofc, the concern with schools first and foremost is the health concerns and that's a big argument in favour of having them shut or from home - but i don't really think people have been talking about the mental health drain on the kids opening up could lead to, especially given there's so many kids out there who would've already lost grandparents, neighbours, and so on, and still are - and will now have this lumped on top too. these conversations are the ones that aren't permeating the mainstream but we definitely should be having
My experience is that the schools themselves are very conscious of this, but we're whistling in the wind where this Government are concerned. Ofqual carried out a consultation exercise about the 2021 exams a month or so ago. I raised this very point when responding in a personal capacity and I gather that my school did in their official capacity too. Ofqual's suggestions at the time only included holding the exams a few weeks later or reducing the number of exams. For me, their first suggestion is irrelevant and the second one actually increases stress levels as there's less chance for students to undo the damage done by a poor performance in one exam. As I mentioned before, they seem obsessed with avoiding the possibility of any students benefiting from this situation, irrespective of the damage they're doing to so many others. But if some students do gain higher GCSE grades than they would have done otherwise, does it really matter? And I would even extend that to a Levels, although the stakes are higher in terms of university placements, apprenticeships or employment. Does it really matter if some students do better than they would have done in normal circumstances? I don't think it does, but I do think we need to protect this generation of students. As you say, there's a heck of a lot going on in young people's lives and we need to look after them.
 

Lillian Thomson

International Coach
I don't think it matters if students get higher grades than they might have. But some will get lower, and anyone with poor grades will be saying "That Mr <insert name here> never liked me".
 
Last edited:

Furball

Evil Scotsman
Using predicted grades is already completely unacceptable imo. The exams shouldn’t have been considered expendable, they should have taken place. ****ing over kids this badly to control a disease which primarily affects the very old is just flat out generational warfare.
But that’s a less popular opinion. We can all agree that what Scotland have done is another level of awful.
I agree with this, by the time the decision was made most of the work would have been done and S4, 5 and 6 pupils could have spent 2 months revising before sitting socially distanced exams.

The other big question that's being ignored while every jumps in the pile on for reasons of political expediency is a detailed look at why teacher predictions were so wildly optimistic (particularly when the number of A grades in 2019 was underestimated by teachers) and wether our method of examinations is appropriate and gets the best out of children.
 

wpdavid

International Coach
I agree with this, by the time the decision was made most of the work would have been done and S4, 5 and 6 pupils could have spent 2 months revising before sitting socially distanced exams.

The other big question that's being ignored while every jumps in the pile on for reasons of political expediency is a detailed look at why teacher predictions were so wildly optimistic (particularly when the number of A grades in 2019 was underestimated by teachers) and wether our method of examinations is appropriate and gets the best out of children.
Yeah, but 'most of the work' still leaves a month or two of topics that wouldn't have been taught. And the exam boards couldn't just ignore the last bits from the specifications in their exams as schools don't all teach courses in the same order.

I suppose one reason why predictions were optimistic was to provide a safety net in the case of them being downgraded.
 

Furball

Evil Scotsman
Yeah, but 'most of the work' still leaves a month or two of topics that wouldn't have been taught. And the exam boards couldn't just ignore the last bits from the specifications in their exams as schools don't all teach courses in the same order.

I suppose one reason why predictions were optimistic was to provide a safety net in the case of them being downgraded.
Granted it's been years since I sat my Highers but most of your work was covered by the time Easter came round. The exam diet normally starts at the beginning of May (bear in mind we finish up for summer at the end of June in Scotland) and is finished by mid June - the last 2 weeks of the year are spent in your new classes for the following year. The amount of actual teaching time that was lost when schools were closed would have been minimal for students sitting exams.
 

wpdavid

International Coach
It sounds like the schedule in Scotland is slightly different to the one in England. Our A Level exams are mostly in the weeks either side of the May half term.
 

Top