• Welcome to the Cricket Web forums, one of the biggest forums in the world dedicated to cricket.

    You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join the Cricket Web community today!

    If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.

The Book Thread

Flem274*

123/5
just finished the poppy war

well ok

it's kinda hard to comprehend who the mc becomes, especially knowing where they begin. this is a really good book and you other nerds (athlai, gimh) will enjoy this. it's pretty ****in dark but doesn't edge lord for the sake of it, and kuang's straight up prose helps because she doesn't glorify it with flowery prose like grimdark authors can fall into.

trundler you'd enjoy this too actually, being the history nerd you are.

the plot has an interesting structure since the true inciting incident begins in act 2. kuang splits the story into 3 parts, but it's more like a boarding school novella followed by a completely different book.

i'm not going to discuss character because i'm not sure how i feel about most of them. kitay is a lovely kid.

my nitpick would be the setting - i know it's Totally Not China vs Totally Not Japan by design, but the obviousness made it jarring initially (for comparison, it's more obviously alternate china than westeros is alternate england). once i settled into the story though the setting feels great to read. there's also a scene that feels a bit like a sidequest but it builds the relationship between two characters so that's fine.

for a debut novel this is astonishingly good.

edit - getting my popcorn out for a booktube dive into the rant reviews. 1:26 into a video a short haired girl says the first instance of this book being 'problematic'
 
Last edited:

Spark

Global Moderator
the second book is even better than the first imo (and the first is really quite incredible).

so hyped for the third book in november.
 

GIMH

Norwood's on Fire
Guys would I like it. I need something fresh to read among the various series I've got going on
 

Flem274*

123/5
swapped books with a friend and i've started too like the lightning by ada palmer. a chapter and a half in and this book has ambition. it took me several pages to figure out whether the narration was first person or omnipresent and the answer is both.

i can already tell she's swinging for the fences on narration style and my friend said she has the same approach to the actual story so im interested.
Guys would I like it. I need something fresh to read among the various series I've got going on
i think it's worth a crack for you
 

_Ed_

Cricket Web: All-Time Legend
I thought Ben Elton's Time and Time Again was an interesting idea and well-written for the most part. I found the ending quite abrupt and unsatisfactory, but I'm not entirely sure that a truly satisfactory ending would have been possible.
 

Arachnodouche

International Debutant
Woke up wanting to read some horror the other day. Got two done so far.

The Shining Girls by Lauren Beukes: Has a time-travelling serial killer, a bit of a riff on Kings's 11/22/63. It's pulp and inoffensive.

House of Windows by John Langan: This one pissed the **** out of me. The entire story is told unrealistically in the first person and the author finds a way of shoehorning mini-reviews of famous people into his narrator's mouth in the most blatant and self-aggrandizing ways. And it's not obscure artists either, just your regular Dickens, Dali, Dostoevsky fare, but done in a very "hey look at me, I'm an intellectual, I've read so-and-so, and this is my opinion of their work!" manner. The story is some variant of the biblical father-curses-son trope, overreaches itself on every level, and achieves neither suspense nor horror. For a book that drops so many literary references, it is lacking in any and all literary aspiration.

The third is The Passage by Justin Cronin, which so far is a breath of fresh air compared to the other two. This reads like a stewed-in-the-lore writer with a firm grip on mood, setting, tempo, and expression.
 

GIMH

Norwood's on Fire
So on my ASOIAF re-read I'm on A Feast for Crows. The good chapters are as good as I remembered. Cersei, Jaime. But my god the Brienne chapters are dulllllllll and I can't say I'd miss the Kraken stuff if it wasn't there either.

I'll get this done in about a week, then onto Dance. I've then got a stack of new stuff to read, I'll keep you all posted
 

Shady Slim

International Regular
i'm currently about two thirds of the way through moneyball and i am absolutely loving it, one of the best things i've read in a while and i'm an absolute sucker for how michael lewis writes non fiction tbh

after that i'm looking in to breakfast of champions and a confederacy of dunces, both recommended to me by friends
 

Teja.

Global Moderator
So on my ASOIAF re-read I'm on A Feast for Crows. The good chapters are as good as I remembered. Cersei, Jaime. But my god the Brienne chapters are dulllllllll and I can't say I'd miss the Kraken stuff if it wasn't there either.

I'll get this done in about a week, then onto Dance. I've then got a stack of new stuff to read, I'll keep you all posted
Look out for the understated Northern politics (Roose Bolton, Lady Dustin, Manderly etc.) in the fifth. Didn't register too strongly when I first read the books but it's now one of my favourite parts. Peak political fiction stuff.
 

Lillian Thomson

International Coach
In 1998 I bought a copy of Never Love a Stranger by Harold Robbins after watching a repeat of an episode of Fawlty Towers that references it. Still haven’t read it.
 

Flem274*

123/5
i finished too like the lightning by ada palmer, book 1 in a series due to be finished this year or next. tl;dr - if sledger shovelled certain substances into his nose and wrote a book, it might look like this.

it's one of the strangest books i've ever read, but in a good way i think. it takes some getting used to and it does not hold your hand. it's hard to describe what it's about because a description would almost be misleading tbh because this book just does whatever it likes. you read the back and you're like 'oh yea ok' and then you read the book and you're like 'ummmmmm'.

briefly, it's a science fiction book set 300 years from now on earth. there is a mystery break in to an important house that also houses a miracle kid. you see the story mostly through the eyes of mycroft canner and his narration is first person omnipresent unreliable and often fourth wall breaking written in varying styles but with enlightenment era inspiration throughout. mycroft is serving permanent community service for crimes he has committed.

you will love it or you will hate it. if it pisses you off after a few chapters, don't bother, it just goes even further. even beyond that point there will might be sections where you go 'yea nah im out'. this book has massive ambition and breaks all the rules and i respect palmer for how hard she's swinging her bat. i saw a 1 star review for this and it's completely right - i just have a different reaction to that reader.

my only criticism would be she was forced to chop a book in half (books 1 and 2 are meant to be read back to back) so the ending doesn't wrap up everything neatly but i found its revelations satisfying and interesting.
 

Top