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Isis

G.I.Joe

International Coach
Hey, call it what you like. I usually spend my time doodling into a notebook at the morning khutbahs at work.
 

AndyZaltzHair

International Coach
An overlooked point on this is that the ancient Syrian and Iraqi artifacts are being sold to countries in the area who will pay for them to develop a faux history for themselves.

It's sickening but there are and have been lots of political reasons to support ISIS, both within the Middle East and from overseas.
It's cringeworthy when they say every country is at war against ISIS when many of them are funding and supporting ISIS wearing masks
 

social

Hall of Fame Member
So Isis has killed their first Chinese national

I thought that they were stupid to go after the Russians but the Chinese are potentially on a whole other level as they literally do not give a ****
 
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Spark

Global Moderator
So Isis has killed their first Chinese national

I thought that they were stupid to go after the Russians but the Chinese are potentially on a whole other level as they literally do not give a ****
Eh, I wouldn't be so sure. China is already mass-censoring mentions to the killing on their internet; they really, really do not like getting tangled up in foreign military adventures.
 

Uppercut

Request Your Custom Title Now!
Ha but that's his point. The Middle East can only dream of the political situation on the subcontinent.
 

watson

Banned
I think that Lebanon is a closer parallel to Iraq and Syria as it too had a sectarian Civil War. The Lebonese killed eachother for a full 16 years (1975 to 1991) before working out that it was a bad idea. So I think it's a matter of letting the events take their natural course in Iraq and Syria and assume that once the warring parties have had enough carnage they'll want to go to the peace table and draw up a proper constitution.

That being the case, the West should take on a minimalist role, meddle as little as possible, and aim for simple containment. Pretty much what's happening now. Since Saudi Arabia and Iran are ultimately responsible for most of the conflict and refugee crisis they should be forced by the UN to fix the refugee crisis. As I type Saudi Arabia is in the middle of expelling no less than 1 million 'illegal migrants'. Not good enough.
 
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Victor Ian

International Vice-Captain
It is not Saudi Arabia and Iran doing the funding. It is Uncle Sam and Israel. (negating one unfounded claim with it's equal and opposite unfounded claim)

I have a better understanding now of how foreign policy works. They have little choice, other than intervention abroad, as they are forced to listen to all those people who revel in their knowledge of history to justify stupid idea after stupid idea. The idiot of wisdom knows it is as simple as keep the F out of other peoples affairs, but no one listens to him as he does not have a degree. The idiot of education keeps trying to justify involvement on all sorts of grounds based on the history. As no one has ever written about the times people did nothing, he can never arrive at this conclusion.
 

Victor Ian

International Vice-Captain
Everyone knows that money is a lethal weapon. You put the money in a gun and press the trigger and bam...dead body. You strap money to your body, pull the cord and bam....dead bodies. Who makes and supplies the weapons and ammunition that these terrorist use? They are who you should apportion blame upon. Money, at best, can only inflict paper cuts.
 

watson

Banned
It is not Saudi Arabia and Iran doing the funding. It is Uncle Sam and Israel. (negating one unfounded claim with it's equal and opposite unfounded claim)

I have a better understanding now of how foreign policy works. They have little choice, other than intervention abroad, as they are forced to listen to all those people who revel in their knowledge of history to justify stupid idea after stupid idea. The idiot of wisdom knows it is as simple as keep the F out of other peoples affairs, but no one listens to him as he does not have a degree. The idiot of education keeps trying to justify involvement on all sorts of grounds based on the history. As no one has ever written about the times people did nothing, he can never arrive at this conclusion.
Sorry, but the prime movers in the Middle East are Saudi Arabia and Iran. True, Saudi Arabia is an ally to the US, but it is still an autonomous state. Plus it has numerous mega wealthy Princes who have an axe to grind with the Shia. The US has very little influence over Iran. As for Israel funding Hezbollah and ISIS et al, well that makes no sense at all. Why would Israel fund and arm terrorist organizations that would destroy the state of Israel given half the chance?

Another article......

Saudi Arabia, Iran and the 'Great Game' in Yemen

Reminiscent of the "Great Game" played out in Afghanistan between Great Britain and Russia more than a hundred years ago, Saudi Arabia and Iran are engaged in their own decades-long strategic rivalry for power and influence in the Middle East, stretching from the Mediterranean Sea to the Gulf and Arabian Sea. It is built mostly along sectarian and ideological lines - Saudi Arabia as the leader of the Sunni Muslim world, and Iran as the leader of the Shia Muslim world.*

While recent high-level discussions between the Saudi and Iranian foreign ministers would suggest a possible thawing in their cold relations, the fact of the matter is, too much bad blood exists between them for any meaningful, long-term rapprochement, at least in the near-term. The more likely state of affairs is that they are simply reassessing their strategies, taking into account all the events in the region, and preparing their next moves on the Middle East chessboard.

In playing their Great Game, Saudi Arabia and Iran have engaged in a series of proxy wars to undermine each other, some hot and some cold, throughout the Middle East. In Lebanon, it's the Iran-backed Hezbollah. In Syria, it's the longtime Iran-backed Assad regime. In Iraq, it's an Iran-backed Shia government which was, prior to the US invasion in 2003, solidly in the Sunni camp.

In Bahrain and the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia, Iran works behind the scenes to undermine those governments through the Shia communities, a threat Saudi Arabia takes so seriously that they sent military forces into Bahrain in 2011 to help quell the Shia uprising there. And then there is Yemen. While it is debatable as to how involved they were in supporting the Houthi uprising, the sudden turn of events on the ground there does play favourably into Iran’s hand. But why?

Iran's long-term strategic interest in Yemen is simple. Located on the southwestern tip of the Gulf peninsula, Yemen is a poorly governed, fractious country straddling Saudi Arabia's southern border, which can be likened to a sieve in terms of ancient smuggling routes still used by those wanting to covertly enter the kingdom. And with a population that is 35 percent Shia, Yemen could serve as a potentially friendly base of operations in Iran's rivalry against Saudi Arabia. For Iran, easier access to Yemen means easier access to Saudi Arabia. But is that really Iran's intent?.........

So what does this mean? Is Yemen really that important to Saudi Arabia and Iran? The short answer is yes, and each side seems prepared to draw their proverbial line in the sand. For Saudi Arabia, what happens south of their border is a matter of grave national security, particularly now that the future of Yemen is in question. They cannot allow instability there to give Iran a solid foothold on the peninsula or AQAP free movement northwards.

Iran's line in the sand is Iraq and Syria. Both those countries serve as buffers between Iran and the Sunni Middle East, so having stable and dependable Shia-led governments in each serves as a strategic objective that is non-negotiable for Iran. Which brings up the Yemen card, a strategic bargaining chip that Iran may now be holding vis-a-vis the sudden rise of the Houthis and anticipated domestic chaos that is sure to plague the country for the foreseeable future.

By playing it, Iran would seek to pressure the Saudis to tread lightly in Iraq and Syria or risk a concerted effort to further undermine them from their southern border. The question now is, will the Saudis make their stand in Yemen or blink? And so the Great Game goes on.

Saudi Arabia, Iran and the 'Great Game' in Yemen - Al Jazeera English
 
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Victor Ian

International Vice-Captain
I'll see your supposed truth by journalism and raise you.

“In a new report from the UN, it is revealed that the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) were maintaining regular contact with members of the so-called Islamic State since May of 2013. Initial reports from the IDF stated that this was only for medical care for civilians, but that story fell apart when the UN observers identified direct contact between IDF forces and ISIS soldiers, including giving medical care to ISIS fighters. Observations even included the transfer of two crates from the IDF to ISIS forces, the contents of which have not been confirmed at this time. Further the UN report identified what the Syrians label a crossing point of forces between Israel and ISIS, a point of concern brought before the UN Security Council. This report from the UN strengthens the claims by the Syrian regime that Israel is heavily involved in operations within the nation.”

UN Report Reveals How Israel is Coordinating with ISIS Militants Inside Syria
I anticipate your next move being to discredit my source (after all, it was sourced within 20 seconds). I don't need to discredit yours. My point is that no one really knows. We are all in the dark, largely because any truth in these situations is hidden beneath layers of national security.
 

watson

Banned
I'll see your supposed truth by journalism and raise you.



I anticipate your next move being to discredit my source (after all, it was sourced within 20 seconds). I don't need to discredit yours. My point is that no one really knows. We are all in the dark, largely because any truth in these situations is hidden beneath layers of national security.
It is possible that individual elements of the IDF are assisting ISIS. However, on a strategic level it would be foolish for Israel to commit any firm policy toward ISIS until the conflict in Syria is more fully played out;


ISIS: What Does It Mean for Israel?

......Faced with all this, what should Israel do? The calculus is becoming more complicated but the strategy is obvious: wait and see. Be evermore on the alert and increase the intensity of intelligence and other operations outside of Israel. Israeli-Palestinian negotiations are on hold for, not months but years. Whether it is more imperative for Israel to make a deal with the Palestinians or more important not to do so is moot. Whether Israel's interest is somehow to act against ISIS has no obvious answer.

In any case, ISIS has justified an Israeli policy of strength and skeptical diplomacy. Israel lives in a tough, tumultuous neighbourhood.

ISIS: What Does It Mean for Israel? | Ronald Tiersky
 

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