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AB de Villers vs Michael Bevan vs Sachin Tendulkar

Jayro

School Boy/Girl Cricketer
If you were to have only one of these three in your all time Odi eleven, who would you choose and why?
 

CricAddict

International Vice-Captain
Sachin Tendulkar. Can do all that the other two do plus some.

But Sachin need not have been included in this comparison. Does a completely different role to the other two.
 

stephen

Hall of Fame Member
Tendulkar was a fair bit better than other ODI openers. Bevan and de Villiers, while both being undeniable top tier batsmen, are not that far ahead of the next best choices in their roles. So Tendulkar it is.
 

Red_Ink_Squid

International Regular
Of the 3, the soonest I’d leave out is Bevan. An ODI great, obviously, but someone like Dhoni can fill his batting slot just as well. Plus you could argue that since an ATG XI is gonna have stacked batting anyway you can afford to pick players with higher strike rates in the middle order even if they average a touch less than Bevan.

Next is harder, but I’d perhaps leave out Sachin, even though I think he is the GOAT opener in ODIs. There are other gun options you can pick there, like Lara or Rohit as specialists or you could push Kohli up to open (Viv at 3) or you could use the slot to fit in a great allrounder like Gilchrist, Jayasuriya or Watson.

I don’t think there are quite as many options to replace the combination of reliability and explosiveness in batting, plus top tier fielding that de Villiers adds. But hard to say whether the gap between him and e.g. Ponting is greater than between Sachin and e.g. Lara.
 

honestbharani

Whatever it takes!!!
Of the 3, the soonest I’d leave out is Bevan. An ODI great, obviously, but someone like Dhoni can fill his batting slot just as well. Plus you could argue that since an ATG XI is gonna have stacked batting anyway you can afford to pick players with higher strike rates in the middle order even if they average a touch less than Bevan.

Next is harder, but I’d perhaps leave out Sachin, even though I think he is the GOAT opener in ODIs. There are other gun options you can pick there, like Lara or Rohit as specialists or you could push Kohli up to open (Viv at 3) or you could use the slot to fit in a great allrounder like Gilchrist, Jayasuriya or Watson.

I don’t think there are quite as many options to replace the combination of reliability and explosiveness in batting, plus top tier fielding that de Villiers adds. But hard to say whether the gap between him and e.g. Ponting is greater than between Sachin and e.g. Lara.
Yeah, this is where I am too.
 

Himannv

Cricketer Of The Year
If the idea is to have the player in an ODI all time XI, then it's Tendulkar - he's simply the best ODI opener and no one else is even close. My personal favourite is ABdV and I think he's probably the best ODI batsman of the three but you can argue that there are other options you can have in the middle order that will compensate for his absence and you can leave him out without it resulting in a very big drop in quality. Bevan is not at the same level as the other two although he was one of my favourites when watching cricket in the 90s.
 

stephen

Hall of Fame Member
If the idea is to have the player in an ODI all time XI, then it's Tendulkar - he's simply the best ODI opener and no one else is even close. My personal favourite is ABdV and I think he's probably the best ODI batsman of the three but you can argue that there are other options you can have in the middle order that will compensate for his absence and you can leave him out without it resulting in a very big drop in quality. Bevan is not at the same level as the other two although he was one of my favourites when watching cricket in the 90s.
Bevan is easily at the same level as the other two. His strike rate, adjusted for era would be in the 90s today and his era adjusted average would be 70. He was miles ahead of his contemporaries in the 90s.
 

Himannv

Cricketer Of The Year
Bevan is easily at the same level as the other two. His strike rate, adjusted for era would be in the 90s today and his era adjusted average would be 70. He was miles ahead of his contemporaries in the 90s.
My memory is tainted by instances when he could have scored faster and chose not to.
 

ankitj

Hall of Fame Member
Tendulkar because there is only one opening batsmen in the absolute elite category. For ABD and Bevan, there are replacements such as Richards, Kohli, Dhoni etc. who would do just as well.
 

Jack7

International 12th Man
Don’t really feel like picking one over the other two. Tendulkar is being overrated in this thread however I look at it though
 

subshakerz

International 12th Man
Tendulkar. Along with Viv, ODI's greatest all-round batsman. Transcended eras.

AB Devilliers was devastating but I think his record flatters him a bit.

Bevan is actually underrated, but he was a specialist. His lack of heavy hitting power means he falls just under the top billing.
 

stephen

Hall of Fame Member
Oh, that means Tendulkar's Avg and SR should get adjusted up more.
Not really. It should be adjusted upwards similarly though. But Tendulkar played a few years before Bevan and many years after him (with the bigger bats etc...).

Today's statistics in ODIs are absolutely ridiculous. The average strike rate (overall, not just top 6 batsmen) has risen from 76 in the 90s to 89 in the 2010s. The average runs per wicket has risen from 29.3 to 32.56. That's a 10% inflation in the *average* score. So batsmen in the 2010s scored 10% more runs 17% faster than before.

If you only look at top 6 batsmen the stats get really wild.

Top 6 batsmen in the 90s averaged 32 at a strike rate of 70. Top 6 batsmen in the 2010s averaged 37 at a strike rate of 85. That is, top 6 batsmen score 15% more runs 21% faster in the 2010s than they did in the 90s.

Making the proper adjustments, if Bevan batted in the 2010s instead of 1994-2003, he'd have averaged 61 at a strike rate of 87, which is damned close to Kohli's output in the same time period.

These queries compare the 90s and 10s statistically:

 

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