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‘Sophia’ - the World’s First Robot to be Granted Citizenship Status

watson

Banned
Combine Atlas’ ‘muscle’ power with Sophia’s brain and you could pretty much have yourself a Skynet prototype....

 

shankar

International Debutant
The advancements in the 'brain' are ridiculously over-hyped and not anywhere close to real 'learning' with respect to knowledge about the world (as opposed to the 'practical' knowledge of how to perform a task).
 

watson

Banned
Robots Will Transform Fast Food
That might not be a bad thing.



Visitors to henn-na, a restaurant outside Nagasaki, Japan, are greeted by a peculiar sight: their food being prepared by a row of humanoid robots that bear a passing resemblance to the Terminator. The “head chef,” incongruously named Andrew, specializes in okonomiyaki, a Japanese pancake. Using his two long arms, he stirs batter in a metal bowl, then pours it onto a hot grill. While he waits for the batter to cook, he talks cheerily in Japanese about how much he enjoys his job. His robot colleagues, meanwhile, fry donuts, layer soft-serve ice cream into cones, and mix drinks. One made me a gin and tonic.

H.I.S., the company that runs the restaurant, as well as a nearby hotel where robots check guests into their rooms and help with their luggage, turned to automation partly out of necessity. Japan’s population is shrinking, and its economy is booming; the unemployment rate is currently an unprecedented 2.8 percent. “Using robots makes a lot of sense in a country like Japan, where it’s hard to find employees,” CEO Hideo Sawada told me.

Sawada speculates that 70 percent of the jobs at Japan’s hotels will be automated in the next five years.
“It takes about a year to two years to get your money back,” he said. “But since you can work them 24 hours a day, and they don’t need vacation, eventually it’s more cost-efficient to use the robot.”

This may seem like a vision of the future best suited—perhaps only suited—to Japan. But according to Michael Chui, a partner at the McKinsey Global Institute, many tasks in the food-service and accommodation industry are exactly the kind that are easily automated. Chui’s latest research estimates that 54 percent of the tasks workers perform in American restaurants and hotels could be automated using currently available technologies—making it the fourth-most-automatable sector in the U.S.

The robots, in fact, are already here. Chowbotics, a company in Redwood City, California, manufactures Sally, a boxy robot that prepares salads ordered on a touch screen. At a Palo Alto café, I watched as she deposited lettuce, corn, barley, and a few inadvertently crushed cherry tomatoes into a bowl. Botlr, a robot butler, now brings guests extra towels and toiletries in dozens of hotels around the country. I saw one at the Aloft Cupertino......

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2018/01/iron-chefs/546581/

The near future does not require the importation of labour nor population growth. Both of these ideas are so 20th century and already outdated.
 

Spark

Global Moderator
Has anyone checked out the AlphaZero vs Stockfish chess match? Pretty astonishing tstl.
 

watson

Banned
Has anyone checked out the AlphaZero vs Stockfish chess match? Pretty astonishing tstl.
Have now thanks.....

Mastering Chess and Shogi by Self-Play with a General Reinforcement Learning Algorithm

Abstract
The game of chess is the most widely-studied domain in the history of artificial intel- ligence. The strongest programs are based on a combination of sophisticated search tech- niques, domain-specific adaptations, and handcrafted evaluation functions that have been refined by human experts over several decades. In contrast, the AlphaGo Zero program recently achieved superhuman performance in the game of Go, by tabula rasa reinforce- ment learning from games of self-play. In this paper, we generalise this approach into a single AlphaZero algorithm that can achieve, tabula rasa, superhuman performance in many challenging domains. Starting from random play, and given no domain knowledge except the game rules, AlphaZero achieved within 24 hours a superhuman level of play in the games of chess and shogi (Japanese chess) as well as Go, and convincingly defeated a world-champion program in each case.


.......We also analysed the relative performance of AlphaZero’s MCTS search compared to the state-of-the-art alpha-beta search engines used by Stockfish and Elmo. AlphaZero searches just 80 thousand positions per second in chess and 40 thousand in shogi, compared to 70 million for Stockfish and 35 million for Elmo. AlphaZero compensates for the lower number of evalu- ations by using its deep neural network to focus much more selectively on the most promising variations – arguably a more “human-like” approach to search, as originally proposed by Shan- non (27). Figure 2 shows the scalability of each player with respect to thinking time, measured on an Elo scale, relative to Stockfish or Elmo with 40ms thinking time. AlphaZero’s MCTS scaled more effectively with thinking time than either Stockfish or Elmo, calling into question the widely held belief (4, 11) that alpha-beta search is inherently superior in these domains.3

Finally, we analysed the chess knowledge discovered by AlphaZero. Table 2 analyses the most common human openings (those played more than 100,000 times in an online database of human chess games (1)). Each of these openings is independently discovered and played frequently by AlphaZero during self-play training. When starting from each human opening, AlphaZero convincingly defeated Stockfish, suggesting that it has indeed mastered a wide spec- trum of chess play.

https://arxiv.org/pdf/1712.01815.pdf

I found it interesting that AlphaZero ‘independently discovered’ and then seemed to prefer the ‘closed’ systems like the English and the Queens Gambit, rather than the more ‘open’ systems. Openings like the Sicilian and the Kings Indian which are popular with human Grandmasters were relatively ignored.

So does this mean that ‘closed’ systems like the English and Queens Gambit are objectively superior?

And all after only 24 hours of practice (‘self-play’). Scary.
 

Spark

Global Moderator
So uh did Google just develop something that passed the Turing test without actually thinking through what that would mean
 

vcs

Request Your Custom Title Now!
I don't think it's that big a deal TBH.. AI/machine learning/deep learning does a lot more scarier things today than carry out a fairly narrow conversation in English to book an appointment with a human receptionist. They must have had most of the building blocks for this thing in place already (chatbot, text-to-voice translation etc.)
 

vcs

Request Your Custom Title Now!
It's remarkable how deep neural networks have come back into vogue so spectacularly in AI after being invented, and discarded at some point in the early '90s. The underlying principles are surprisingly simple, and the nice thing about them is that they can (theoretically) universally approximate pretty much any function you want to (provided there's enough data to tweak the parameters of course).
 

Daemon

Request Your Custom Title Now!
More than AI going rogue shouldn't the concern be people embedding things in AI for nefarious purposes.
 

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