Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 38

Thread: Test Cricket's 25 Greatest Smiths

  1. #1
    Request Your Custom Title Now! Spikey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    All Glory To The Nev
    Posts
    31,905

    Test Cricket's 25 Greatest Smiths

    Indians can't bowl - Where has the rumour come from as I myself and many indian friends arwe competent fast bowlers ?

    With the English bid I said: Let us be brief. If you give back the Falkland Islands, which belong to us, you will get my vote. They then became sad and left

  2. #2
    Request Your Custom Title Now! Spikey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    All Glory To The Nev
    Posts
    31,905
    25 - Denis Smith (England, 1935)





    Wisden obituary

    Denis Smith died suddenly at Derby on September 12, aged 72. Born at Somercotes on January 24, 1907, he played for Derbyshire from 1927 until 1951. He was then appointed county coach in succession to Harry Elliott, making a solitary appearance in 1952 in an emergency and finally ending his 44-year connection with the club in 1971, though he was quietly scouting until last year. By 1930 he had developed into a reliable left-handed batsman, scoring 83 and 105 in Payton's benefit match at Trent Bridge. In the next match, his 107 at The Oval was largely responsible for Derbyshire's first victory against Surrey for 26 years. At this time he was opening the innings, and although he dropped down the order at times over the years, he is best remembered as an opener. His ability in this direction was to bring something rare to Derbyshire- success. In four consecutive seasons, Derbyshire were twice third, runners-up in 1935 (which from a playing point of view was a better year than 1936) and champions in 1936.

    Tall and elegant in style, he approached the artistry of Frank Woolley, though not possessing the fluency of the Kent player. Usually attractive to watch, Smith's forcing shots were well executed, being severe on anything over-pitched, especially on middle or leg stump, and his runs came at a good rate. Throughout most of the 1930s his usual opening partners were Storer or Alderman - the latter an almost perfect foil to Smith's aggression - and they could be relied on to give the side a sound start. Consistent batting in the early weeks of 1935 gained him Test recognition in two matches against South Africa, when he shared in stands of 52 and 128 at Headingley with scores of 36 and 57, followed by 35 and a failure at Old Trafford. He scored over 2,000 runs that year, becoming one of Wisden's Five, and exceeded 1,000 runs on twelve occasions - a county record, as was his aggregate of 20,516 runs and his 30 centuries. He played for the Players at Lord's in 1935 and in the second innings scored 78 out of 112 for The Rest against the Champion County when no other player reached double figures. This was the last such match to be played, so he was denied the honour of appearing for both sides in successive years when Derbyshire won the championship in 1936. He toured Australia and New Zealand in the winter of 1935-36 with the MCC under the captaincy of Errol Holmes. No Tests were played but in the representative matches against New Zealand his average was over 43, and he shared in stands of 239 with J. H. Parks against Otago and 204 with W. Barber against Queensland.

    Following his 189 against Yorkshire at Chesterfield in the opening match of 1935, an innings he considered marked the turning point of his career, came his highest score of 225 versus Hampshire on the same ground, when he sustained a broken rib which caused his absence from the first Test that Year. In 1937 he made 202 not out at Trent Bridge. During the war, he played in the Bradford League and took up wicketkeeping, acting in this capacity for Derbyshire for part of 1946 and 1947 until the arrival of George Dawkes. His usual place in the field was first slip, and it was not unknown for him to bowl an over or two of right-arm medium pace. As county coach he was hard to please, and no doubt he chastened some with his blunt approach. But when words of praise did fall from his lips, the pupil knew they were truly earned.

    Wisden Cricketers' Almanack

    Denis Smith | England Cricket | Cricket Players and Officials | ESPN Cricinfo

  3. #3
    Request Your Custom Title Now! Spikey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    All Glory To The Nev
    Posts
    31,905
    24 - Don Smith (England, 1957)



    Don Smith was a useful allrounder for Sussex in the post-war period, a left-hand opening batsman and left-arm medium-pacer (he started at a spinner but found that he had the ability to swing the ball). His county career started hesitantly, but once he had secured his place in the side he remained an ever present. In 1949 as an opener he scored his maiden hundred - a double against Nottinghamshire - and made 1500 runs, but when David Sheppard came down from Cambridge he found himself dropped down the order, although he was restored from the mid 1950s. Nevertheless, he ended the year with 2088 runs. He took nine wickets in his first nine years at Hove, but in 1955 Robin Marlar suggested he switch to left-arm medium over the wicket and he ended the summer with 73 wickets. His Indian summer came in 1957 when he was 34, and a series of high scores resulted in him being drafted into the England side for the Lord's Test against West Indies. He played three Tests that season, but managed only 25 runs in four innings and took one wicket. Against Gloucestershire, Sussex were set a target of 277 in 195 minutes, and Smith smashed 166 (nine sixes, 11 fours), and he followed with 147 against the West Indians. He retired in 1962, and subsequently was appointed coach and groundsman at Lancing School, a position he held for more than 20 years before becoming Sri Lanka's coach in their early years as a Test-playing country. He subsequently emigrated to Australia.

    Martin Williamson

    Don Smith | Cricket Players and Officials | ESPN Cricinfo

  4. #4
    Request Your Custom Title Now! Spikey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    All Glory To The Nev
    Posts
    31,905
    23 - Ian Smith (South Africa)


    Wisden obituary

    Ian Smith was a legbreak bowler whose usefulness was limited as he did not possess a googly, but on a turning track his accuracy and prodigious spin made him a difficult opponent. He toured England in 1947, taking 7 for 189 on debut at Nottingham in the only match South Africa really competed in. He headed the tour averages with 58 wickets at 23.17, his best of 13 for 66 coming at Derby (including a spell of 6 for 1 which included a hat-trick). He toured again in 1955 but was second fiddle to Hugh Tayfield.

    Martin Williamson

    Ian Smith | Cricket Players and Officials | ESPN Cricinfo
    Last edited by Spikey; 02-09-2013 at 01:00 AM.


  5. #5
    Request Your Custom Title Now! Spikey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    All Glory To The Nev
    Posts
    31,905
    22 - Peter Smith (England, 1946-47)





    Wisden obituary
    Thomas Peter Bromley Smith, who died in France as a result of a brain haemorrhage following a fall while on holiday on August 4, aged 58, played with distinction as a professional all-rounder for Essex from 1929 to 1951. In that time he made 10,170 runs, average 17.98, and took 1,697 wickets--more than any other Essex bowler--for 26.63 runs each. A capital leg-break and googly exponent, he never lost his length even when at times receiving heavy punishment, as when H. T. Bartlett hit him for 28 in an over in the Gentlemen v. Players match at Lord's in 1938.

    In 1933, Peter Smith arrived at The Oval prepared to play for England against the West Indies, only to learn that the telegram informing him of his choice had been sent by a hoaxer. Thirteen years later he did play for his country, against India on the Surrey ground, and he also took part in two Tests with Australia and one with New Zealand when a member of W. R. Hammond's M.C.C. team in 1946-47. Though meeting with little success generally on that tour, he did achieve one notable feat, for his nine wickets for 121 against New South Wales at Sydney is still the best innings-analysis by any M.C.C. bowler in Australia. On three other occasions he dismissed nine batsmen in an innings--for 97 runs against Middlesex at Colchester in 1947, in which game he returned match-figures of 16 for 215, for 117 v. Nottinghamshire at Southend and 108 v. Kent at Maidstone, both in 1948.

    The summer of 1947 was a memorable one for Smith. In scoring 1,063 runs, average 23.66, and taking 172 wickets at 27.13 apiece, he completed the double for the only time in his career. Furthermore, he hit 163--the best of his eight centuries--against Derbyshire at Chesterfield, the highest first-class innings in history by a batsman going in at No. 11, he and F. H. Vigar (114 not out) putting on 218 for the last wicket, which remains a record for Essex. Smith's total of wickets that year is also the largest by an Essex bowler in one season.
    Wisden Cricketers' Almanack

    Peter Smith | Cricket Players and Officials | ESPN Cricinfo
    Last edited by Spikey; 02-09-2013 at 12:38 AM.

  6. #6
    International Coach HeathDavisSpeed's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Rummaging through Iain O'Brien's dustbins.
    Posts
    13,957
    Peter Smith! Oh yes!
    >>>>>>WHHOOOOOOOOOSHHHHHHH>>>>>>
    Fascist Dictator of the Heath Davis Appreciation Society
    Supporting Petone's Finest since the very start - Iain O'Brien
    Adam Wheater - Another batsman off the Essex production line
    Also Supporting the All Time #1 Batsman of All Time Ever - Jacques Kallis and the much maligned Peter Siddle.


    Vimes tells it how it is:
    Quote Originally Posted by Samuel_Vimes View Post
    Heath worryingly quick.

  7. #7
    Request Your Custom Title Now! Spikey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    All Glory To The Nev
    Posts
    31,905
    21 - Steve Smith (Australia, 1984)

    Steve Smith

    Somewhere in here

    Steve Smith was a 23-year-old on the brink of the Australian side when he threw in his lot with the rebel tour of South Africa. A right-hand opener and a good fielder, Smith made his debut for NSW in 1981-82 scoring 245 runs at 40.83; the following summer was even better, and his maiden first-class hundred was a career-best 263 against Victoria. His one-day international debut was equally impressive, scoring a hundred in his third match against New Zealand at Melbourne. He continued to be a part of the ODI squad, toured Sri Lanka and finally made his Test debut in the Caribbean in 1983-84 but struggled against the West Indies pace barrage, making 41 runs in three Tests. He struggled in 1984-85, possibly weighed down by his decision to tour South Africa, but once there he showed his class with an outstanding hundred in the third "Test" at Johannesburg. He ended the tour with 1163 runs at 52.86 and was named one of South Africa's Cricketers of the Year. After two more seasons with NSW he moved to the Cape and played out his career with Transvaal.

    Martin Williamson

    Steve Smith | Cricket Players and Officials | ESPN Cricinfo
    Last edited by Spikey; 02-09-2013 at 12:39 AM.

  8. #8
    Request Your Custom Title Now! Spikey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    All Glory To The Nev
    Posts
    31,905
    20 - Tiger Smith (England, 1912-13)



    Wisden obituary

    THE death of 'Tiger" Smith ends an association with Warwickshire that began up a tree 83 years ago. Born on February 6, 1886, Ernest James Smith was just 10 years old when he watched Kent v Warwickshire from a tree outside his beloved Edgbaston ground. From that day he was hooked on Warwickshire cricket. It was a relationship which mellowed over the years and right up to the recent Test match at Edgbaston he was a familiar, well-loved figure at the ground.

    During that Test it was heart-warming to see men like Bob Willis, Geoff Boycott and Mike Brearley ask him for advice that was readily given and sensibly atriculated with his trusty stick tapping the ground for extra emphasis. It was difficult to imagine, while listening to him analysing Gower"s technique or Taylor"s skills behind the stumps, that this man had played many times with W. G. Grace, had kept wicket behind men like Victor Trumper, Clem Hill, Gilbert Jessop and C. B. Fry, had batted against the likes of Wilfred Rhodes, Colin Blythe and J. J. Kotze.

    He had a colossal memory for incidents in bygone matches yet he could be gracious in his praise of the great modern players. 'This here Viv Richards is a great player," he told me during the Somerset match this season. 'I came here today to criticise him but when his first five scoring shots go for boundaries, what can you say?"

    He was proud to uphold the traditional values of the game ('It"s a sideways-on game," he"d say while wincing at the defects of the current England batsmen, 'doesn"t anybody tell them that these days?").

    On the second day of the Warwickshire v Lancashire match at Edgbaston, (August 13) E. J. ('Tiger") Smith set up a new record of longevity for a professional cricketer. Smith made his first-class debut for Warwickshire, against the South Africans at Edgbaston, on June 16, 1904 and was thus alive 75 years 59 days after his debut, exceeding the record for a professional held by Wilfred Rhodes. He had extended the period to 75 years 77 days at the time of his death.

    A very small number of amateurs exceed Smith. F. A. Mackinnon died in 1947, 76 years 284 days after his first-class debut for Cambridge University, while others to reach 76 years were H. M. Lawrence (Kent), died 1975, and J. Gilman (MCC), died 1976.

    However, the English record appears to be held by H. Jenner, who died in 1904, 77 years 57 days after his appearance for Cambridge in the 1827 University match. Even Jenner has to give best to the Australian-born John Wheatley, however. Wheatley made his first-class debut for Canterbury against Otago in February 1883, and died aged 102 in 1962, 79 years 78 days afterwards.

    But nobody could ever accuse 'Tiger" of living in the past. In his last few days he struggled painfully but cheerfully ('I"ve told 'em I want hops on my coffin not lilies," he"d joke)- but he"d still constructively analyse the batting of Gooch ('You come back and tell me I"m a bloody fool if you like- but you take a look at his front foot")- or the wicketkeeping of Bob Taylor ('They"d be mad not to take him to Australia- he"s got the best pair of hands in the game").

    And no man alive was better qualified to comment on the art of wicketkeeping: on the 1911-12 tour of Australia he stood up to Barnes and Foster in four Tests on those lightning fast wickets. By common consent he kept immaculately, with the highlight a superb leg-side stumping of Clem Hill off Frank Foster at Adelaide ('Bob Crockett, the umpire at square leg, said Good God, Clem, you"re out and I said Aye, and by a long way! I did it again in the second innings but the other umpire was asleep!").

    He could bat too- nearly 17,000 runs and 20 centuries in a career lasting from 1904 to 1930- and in his last season he was still fit enough to score a hundred before lunch against Essex-'and I even had time to drink a glass of Guinness before the players came off for lunch!"

    At the time of his death he was the oldest living Test cricketer - but his real love was Warwickshire. As the county"s coach in the immediate post-war years his disciplinarian yet kindly methods yielded an outstanding crop of players - and even in his last days, he talked with warm affection of his 'boys"- players like David Brown, Dennis Amiss, John Jameson, Jack Bannister, Tom Cartwright and Neal Abberley. And the respectful attention the players continually showed him spoke volumes.

    It"s not an overstatement to say that 'Tiger" Smith was a legend in the game. It"s difficult to think of any Englishman with a more distinguished career in three major facets of the game - 11 Tests as a player, nine seasons as a first-class umpire (including eight Tests) and coach to the champion county in 1951.

    He was present at some of cricket"s great moments - at Leyton in 1932 he signalled the boundary that posted the new world record first-wicket stand by Holmes and Sutcliffe. He kept to Syd Barnes as he mesmerised 49 South African victims in just four Tests in 1913-14. He watched every ball of the epic opening partnership of 323 by Hobbs and Rhodes at Melbourne in 1911-12.

    'Tiger" stood in the Lord"s Test of 1938 when Wally Hammond scored his majestic 240 against Bradman"s Australians and he played in that amazing match against Hampshire when, in 1922, they were bowled out for 15 but still managed to beat Warwickshire by 155 runs.

    He will be fondly remembered for many things by countless people associated with cricket - and anybody privileged to have spent happy hours with him in the company of his family and his beloved wife Rose will confirm that the bark of this endearingly gruff character was considerably worse than his soft-hearted bite.

    Wisden Cricketers' Almanack

    Tiger Smith | Cricket Players and Officials | ESPN Cricinfo
    Last edited by Spikey; 02-09-2013 at 12:40 AM.

  9. #9
    Request Your Custom Title Now! Spikey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    All Glory To The Nev
    Posts
    31,905
    19 - Pom Pom Fellows-Smith (South Africa, 1960)



    "Pom Pom" Fellows-Smith toured England in 1960, all his four Test appearances coming on that one trip. A powerful and uncompromising right-hand batsman whose trademark shots were a hammered off and a variety of leg-side swipes, he was not stranger to English conditions as he had won three cricket Blues at Oxford (as well as one for rugby) and also played for Northamptonshire from 1957, making 109 and 65 not out on debut. He had a disappointing tour in 1960 although he finished with 863 runs at 31.96 and 32 wickets with his legspin. He only played two more first-class matches - both for Free Foresters against his old university - after that tour. In all, of his 94 first-class appearances, only 14 were made in South Africa.

    Martin Williamson

    Pom Pom Fellows-Smith | Cricket Players and Officials | ESPN Cricinfo
    Last edited by Spikey; 02-09-2013 at 12:40 AM.

  10. #10
    Request Your Custom Title Now! Spikey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    All Glory To The Nev
    Posts
    31,905
    18 - David Smith (England, 1961-62)





    Wisden Cricketer obituary
    Opposing counties were apt to make the mistake in the late 1950s and through the 1960s of thinking Gloucestershire were a soft touch when it came to their new ball attack. David Robert Smith, like his partner Tony Brown, wasted the minimum of energy on his run-up. What he did possess was a handsome action, an ability to hit the seam with constant accuracy and a natural away swing from the right-hander. And he was faster than he looked. There was more than a touch of technical malevolence in that deceptively leisurely approach: after all, it brought him 1,250 wickets from 1956-70 and five Tests against India in 1961-62. He topped 100 wickets in a season five times. Apart from his Test appearances, when conditions in India did him no great favours, he had gone on the 1960-61 MCC tour to New Zealand. He was a good tourist, quiet and conscientious. Many of his 292 catches were expertly taken without fuss at slip and on occasions he cherished the scope to belt the ball from low in the order. Although diffident by nature, he was always a popular member of the county side. Injuries at times worked against him, not just at cricket. As a talented left-winger, he played for Bristol Boys at football, later joining Bristol City and, in 1959, Millwall. But cricket remained his unwavering favourite. He made a complete break, however, on his retirement from the game, hardly ever again revisiting the county ground to the surprise and disappointment of many of his former team-mates. Instead he would spend six days a week helping his wife, Peggy, in their fancy goods shop at Fishponds, a district of Bristol near where he was born. "I don't bother too often to see sport on the TV either," he used to say. "Never was much good at sitting and watching." David, a devoted family man, died suddenly at home on December 17, aged 69.

    David Foot


    http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/conte...yer/20236.html
    Last edited by Spikey; 02-09-2013 at 12:40 AM.

  11. #11
    Request Your Custom Title Now! Spikey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    All Glory To The Nev
    Posts
    31,905
    17 - Ed Smith (England, 2004)



    The 15th Smith to be selected for England, but the first to have written a book on baseball, Ed Smith demanded selection for the third Test against South Africa in 2003 thanks to his superb county form. A tall right-hander with a penchant for the drive, Smith picked up six centuries in as many matches for Kent, including a career-best 203 at Blackpool, to become the first batsman to pass 1000 runs for the season. It was a run of form that coincided with a severe downturn in England's fortunes following the resignation of Nasser Hussain, and if his surname was anything to go by, he was just the name to take on South Africa's prolific captain, Graeme Smith. Sure enough, Ed responded with a half-century in his maiden Test innings but managed just 23 runs in his next four outings and was dropped. In 2004 there were rumours that he had become alienated from the Kent dressing-room, and it was no surprise when he moved to Middlesex at the end of the summer. After two consistent seasons he made the natural progression to leadership as he was named captain for the 2007 season. A voracious reader and writer, he picked up a double-first in history despite devoting much of his time at Cambridge University to cricket, and opened for England Under-19s in three Tests against New Zealand in 1996. He broke his ankle in 2008, preventing him from captaining Middlesex for most of the season, and subsequently announced his retirement from first-class cricket in the winter.

    Andrew Miller November 2008

    Ed Smith | Cricket Players and Officials | ESPN Cricinfo

  12. #12
    Request Your Custom Title Now! Spikey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    All Glory To The Nev
    Posts
    31,905
    16 - Cammie Smith (West Indies, 1960-62)



    Cammie Smith was a fearless, attacking batsman who excelled against quick bowling but struggled to cope with spin. He was frustrating to follow, one day outstanding, the next poor. His only Test fifty came against Australia in 1960-61 as he was found out by the spinners. After retiring he managed various West Indies sides, became an ICC match referee, and remained closely associated with the development of the game in Barbados.

    Martin Williamson

    Cammie Smith | Cricket Players and Officials | ESPN Cricinfo

  13. #13
    Request Your Custom Title Now! Spikey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    All Glory To The Nev
    Posts
    31,905
    15 - Alan Smith (England, 1962-63)



    AC Smith was an effective allrounder and, in later years, a leading administrator. A dogged middle-order batsman, a niggly right-arm seamer who bowled off the wrong foot, and a tidy if unspectacular wicketkeeper, his success came early on. He was described more than once as the "complete cricketer". He scored three hundred - two for Oxford in 1959 - held six catches in an innings in 1970 and in 1965 took off his pads and promptly took a hat-trick. He won Blues in all three years for Oxford - he captained them in his last two summers - and after a good summer for Warwickshire was picked, to many people's surprise, to tour Australia and New Zealand in 1962-63 where he kept wicket in six of the eight matches. But competition was fierce and Murray was a better keeper, Parks a better batsman, and he never appeared again. He continued to serve Warwickshire with distinction, leading them to the Championship in 1972 and the Gillette Cup in 1968. After retiring, he was a Test selector, an England tour manager, secretary of Warwickshire, and the first chief executive of the Test & County Cricket Board - in the latter post his unwillingness to commit was legendary. He was also, in his spare time, a director of Aston Villa (he was also a football Blue).

    Martin Williamson

    Alan Smith | Cricket Players and Officials | ESPN Cricinfo

  14. #14
    Request Your Custom Title Now! Spikey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    All Glory To The Nev
    Posts
    31,905
    14 - Chris Smith (England, 1983-86)



    Chris Smith, who qualified for England by virtue of his English parents, was born in Durban on this day. Keen to pursue a career in cricket and frustrated by the apartheid-era ban on international sport with South Africa, he left to try his luck in England having previously toured the country with Kingsmead Mynahs (essentially Natal U-25s) in 1976. Though not as naturally talented as his younger brother Robin, he made himself into a very fine county batsman for Hampshire with a first-class average in the mid- forties. Smith's success was a triumph of nurture over nature, but he only played eight Tests. He went first ball to Richard Hadlee on debut at Lord's in 1983 but had a decent winter in 1983-84, hitting 91 at Auckland and 66 at Faisalabad. For some reason he wasn't picked against West Indies in 1984 and played only one more Test. He went on to become chief executive of the WACA in Perth.

    Rob Smyth

    Chris Smith | Cricket Players and Officials | ESPN Cricinfo

  15. #15
    Request Your Custom Title Now! Spikey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    All Glory To The Nev
    Posts
    31,905
    13 - Tuppy Owen-Smith (South Africa, 1929)



    Wisden obituary

    Dr Harold Geoffrey "Tuppy" Owen-Smith, who died at Cape Town on February 28, 1990, aged 81, made a great name for himself in England in the 1930s as an exceptional all-round sportsman. His prowess at cricket was at least equalled on the rugby field, where he captained England, and he was a champion lightweight boxer. Born at Rondebosch, Cape Town, on February 18, 1909, he was twenty when he first set foot on English soil as a member of the South African touring side. He had had a thorough grounding as a boy at the Diocesan College from such English professionals as Harry Lee, Newman, Astill and O'Connor, and had already made his presence felt in Western Province's two matches against MCC in 1927-28. In the first match of the tour, bowling on a rain-damaged pitch, he took four for 43 in fourteen overs with his slow leg-breaks, and the records seem to show that Hammond was his first victim in first-class cricket. At the end of the tour, when MCC played a return match with Western Province, Owen-Smith made 32 in the second innings.

    He first attracted attention in the early weeks of the 1929 tour by his magnificent fielding in the deep, and especially at cover point. He was fast and he would chase for all he was worth before unleashing a powerful, flat return to the top of the stumps. His anticipation at cover, and his ability to intercept strokes which would leave others standing, made him the star of the fine fielding side, and it is probably safe to say that only two other fielders, Colin Bland and Clive Lloyd, have caused such a stir since his day. In the Second Test at Lord's, going in at No. 7 when his side were in danger of letting a hard-won advantage slip, he first helped Morkel add 48 for the sixth wicket and later took complete control in a last-wicket partnership of 43 with Bell. His judgement and selection of the right ball to hit made a big impression, as did his manipulation of the strike, and he was 52 not out at the close of the innings, having seen South Africa achieve lead of 20 runs. In the Third Test at Headingley, however, they conceded a lead of 102 on first innings and were only 14 runs ahead when they lost their seventh second innings wicket in the last over of the second day. The match seemed as good as over, but next morning Owen-Smith, 27 not out overnight, and Quinn took the score to 167 before Quinn was eighth out, stumped by Duckworth off White. Now Owen-Smith went for the bowling in magnificent style and was in such command that he monopolised the strike before being out for 129, having made 102 before lunch. His stand of 103 with Bell, scored in 65 minutes, has remained a record for South Africa's tenth wicket. So loud and prolonged was the applause while the two returned to the pavilion, they might have won the match for their side. However, England got home, thanks to Woolley, though not without some trouble. In all first-class matches on the tour Owen-Smith made 1,168 runs at 35.39 and took 30 wickets at 25.80 apiece. In addition to his hundred at Leeds he scored 126 against Warwickshire, and the editor of Wisden had no hesitation in choosing him as one of the Five Cricketers of the Year.

    In 1930 Owen-Smith returned to England with a Rhodes Scholarship to study medicine at Oxford, and as expected he won his Blue in all three years. In 1931, saving his best for the big occasion, he made 78 at Lord's and bowled 71 overs for 200 runs and six wickets. His bowling had already brought him excellent analyses against Gloucestershire, Lancashire and the Club Cricket Conference. A year later he made 67 against Cambridge, a valuable effort which helped to save the follow-on, and bowled 76 overs, again taking six wickets. In his final year, with examinations impending, he played less but found the hard, dry pitches of 1933 very much to his liking. He obtained bounce as well as turn. At Lord's he took five for 93 against Cambridge and finished fourth in the national averages. When Owen-Smith continued his medical training at St. Mary's Hospital in 1935, he was able to turn out for Middlesex in August, and to a lesser extent in 1936. In 1937 he played in twelve Championship games and took 57 wickets at 19.84, including eight for 103 against Gloucestershire at Lord's. In the Challenge Match that September between Middlesex and Yorkshire at The Oval, which the Yorkshiremen won easily, Owen-Smith made 77 in Middlesex's first innings, the next highest score being 25. His genius with the bat also shone brightly when, playing for MCC at Lord's, he gave his old university a drubbing to the tune of a career highest 168 not out, producing a wide variety of strokes with astonishing ease. And to rub it in, he took five for 33 in Oxford's first innings. In South Africa, he played in the Currie Cup before and after the war, and at Cape Town in 1948-49, after service in the Middle East, he took 65 not out off MCC in the opening match of their tour. In all he made 4,059 runs in first-class cricket for an average of 26.88, while his bowling earned him 319 wickets at 23.22. Quite apart from his 93 catches, he must have saved hundreds of runs by his superb fielding. In Test matches he averaged 42.00 in 1929 with 252 runs to take third place in the averages.

    Looking back over the years, it is legitimate to ask why Owen-Smith's cricket aroused so much enthusiasm. Quite apart from the exhilarating nature of his play, it was the young man himself who had such a wide appeal. Cricket in England in the 1920s had largely been dominated by the older generation; the flower of the nation's young manhood had been cut down in Flanders, and Owen-Smith's play and his debonair attitude seemed to fill the gap. A famous writer on the game likened him to Denis Compton more than anyone else he could think of. Like Compton, Owen-Smith was just as likely to make runs with a borrowed bat as with his own; like Compton he communicated his enjoyment of cricket to thousands.

    Wisden Cricketers' Almanack

    Tuppy Owen-Smith | Cricket Players and Officials | ESPN Cricinfo

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 16
    Last Post: 05-07-2009, 07:54 AM
  2. Why Test Cricket is the Greatest Game of All
    By Brett Dale in forum Cricket Chat
    Replies: 48
    Last Post: 16-03-2008, 11:58 PM
  3. Greatest influence on Cricket by a non Test player
    By Malleeboy in forum Cricket Chat
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: 18-12-2007, 01:45 PM
  4. counties chasing steve smiths' signature.
    By brockley in forum Cricket Chat
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-10-2007, 04:02 AM
  5. Replies: 19
    Last Post: 06-04-2005, 07:19 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •