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Thread: The Book Thread

  1. #1801
    Global Moderator nightprowler10's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sledger View Post
    Slow, dry and tedious imo. Not half as thought provoking as it likes to think it is
    The first half maybe, but the story really picks up after you start finding out more about Gatsby. Maybe not as thought provoking but you really feel connected to the narrator and Gatsby by the end. Definitely worth a read IMO.
    RIP Craigos

  2. #1802
    Global Moderator nightprowler10's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pothas View Post
    Love in the Time of Cholera, just SO good.
    I read Chronicles of a Death Foretold last year too after rereading 100 Hundred Years of Solitude. My favorite author for some time now.

  3. #1803
    Cricket Web: All-Time Legend smalishah84's Avatar
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    I found love in the time of cholera to be extremely tedious. Couldn't even complete it.
    And smalishah's avatar is the most classy one by far Jan certainly echoes the sentiments of CW

    Yeah we don't crap in the first world; most of us would actually have no idea what that was emanating from Ajmal's backside. Why isn't it roses and rainbows like what happens here? PEWS's retort to Ganeshran on Daemon's picture depicting Ajmal's excreta

  4. #1804
    Spanish_Vicente sledger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nightprowler10 View Post
    The first half maybe, but the story really picks up after you start finding out more about Gatsby. Maybe not as thought provoking but you really feel connected to the narrator and Gatsby by the end. Definitely worth a read IMO.
    The second half is better, from what I remember, but it still didn't really do anything for me. It's not that I thought it was really terrible or anything, but I just couldn't for the life of me understand why it gets so much critical acclaim. Mind you, I've only read it once, and this was probably about ten years ago.


  5. #1805
    Spanish_Vicente sledger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KiWiNiNjA View Post
    Would be interested in knowing how you find it.

    I've been waiting for it to come down in price for Kindle.
    I've read the first 70 pages or so, and it's been pretty enjoyable so far.

    Seems to be standard Murakami fare tbh. Very easy to read but yet strange and somewhat otherworldly.

    I'm noticing a recurring trend with his books though, the main protagonists almost always seem to be more or less the same character. (i.e. Character 1 is a single adult male of middle age, living by himself, doing a fairly ordinary job, who despite being perfectly pleasant, intelligent and socially adept has little to no friends or family, and no real ambition to do anything with his life. Character 2, who through some turn of events becomes involved with character 1, is a female in her late teens/early twenties, who has some special talent of some sort. She is usually socially inept and talks in a strange way, and is basically rude and strange. Despite this, character 1 finds her interesting, despite her being a total bitch, and decides to help her in her endeavour somehow.)

    I don't mind this especially, as it's always well written, and the tales themselves are fairly different. But this sort of character relationship does seem to be the stock of most of his work.

  6. #1806
    International Coach KiWiNiNjA's Avatar
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    Character 1 is Murakami himself.

  7. #1807
    Hall of Fame Member Son Of Coco's Avatar
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    Have recently read the last three books in Alexander McCall-Smith's 44 Scotland Street series and am now reading the latest of the Rebus novels by Ian Rankin. Have been a fan of McCall-Smith for a while, it's easy to relate to the characters he presents in his books and I like the fact the books are set in a city I've lived in. Same goes with the Rebus series as far as the setting is concerned.
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  8. #1808
    Global Moderator nightprowler10's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by smalishah84 View Post
    I found love in the time of cholera to be extremely tedious. Couldn't even complete it.
    Have you read any of his other works?

  9. #1809
    Global Moderator nightprowler10's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sledger View Post
    The second half is better, from what I remember, but it still didn't really do anything for me. It's not that I thought it was really terrible or anything, but I just couldn't for the life of me understand why it gets so much critical acclaim. Mind you, I've only read it once, and this was probably about ten years ago.
    I think its an important piece as a commentary on the American dream, which is why it gets listed as some of the most important American literature along with Catcher in the Rye.

  10. #1810
    Cricket Web: All-Time Legend smalishah84's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nightprowler10 View Post
    Have you read any of his other works?
    No, I haven't. I thought that since it is one of his more well known works so why not start with it. I couldn't end up finishing it so never bothered picking up another of his works.

    Incidentally for some reason (and I don't know why) I was under the impression that GGM wrote like paulo coelho (whose books I really really like) and hence picked up Love in the time of cholera. I was so wrong

  11. #1811
    Hall of Fame Member grecian's Avatar
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    Read Koji Suzuki's Loop, oh good it was all a matrix thingy, wish I hadn't bothered with the first two now *sighs*. Bikes featured heavily though, which is good because of the authors name.

    Any Saffies read Deon Meyer, I'm a fan, but how does he read for a native, and how is he perceived in his own country?
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  12. #1812
    Global Moderator nightprowler10's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by smalishah84 View Post
    No, I haven't. I thought that since it is one of his more well known works so why not start with it. I couldn't end up finishing it so never bothered picking up another of his works.

    Incidentally for some reason (and I don't know why) I was under the impression that GGM wrote like paulo coelho (whose books I really really like) and hence picked up Love in the time of cholera. I was so wrong
    Love in the Time of Cholera might not be the most accessible, though I still haven't read it. You might find 100 Years of Solitude an easier read.

    Finished Zealot which was interesting. I don't think is presenting anything new here but I do like the way he connected all the dots and I totally enjoyed his descriptions of the Jewish customs at the time around the Temple. Good read.

    Read quickly though Lord of the Flies as well. Not sure what to say about something that is so referenced in popular culture. It is what you expect it to be but the words are delivered powerfully. The symbolism is at times on the nose but it never detracts from the story itself. Very good read.

    Still ignoring the books I have on the shelf... and bought Germs, Guns, and Steel by Jared Diamond. It is a study of human societies' evolution in order to theorize why it was the Eurasian and North African peoples throughout history that have largely been the conquerors and enslavers of Native Americans / Africans that forever influenced the world as we know it and not the other way around. There's a lot more to what he's theorizing about than just that, but you get the gist. I'm only about 10% into it but a very interesting read so far, and very tough to put down.
    Last edited by nightprowler10; 14-10-2013 at 11:16 AM.

  13. #1813
    Cricket Web: All-Time Legend smalishah84's Avatar
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    Reading a bit of non fiction these days. A pretty good book by Nate Silver The Signal and the Noise: Why So Many Predictions Fail — but Some Don't. It discusses real life applications of statistical modeling and apparently (since I haven't reached that part) does a marvelous job of explaining how to apply bayesian theory to real life problems. Bayesian theory was always something that I struggled with and so far I am really enjoying the book. Anybody else know of other such books that handle the subject of applied statistics and probability?

  14. #1814
    Cricketer Of The Year Agent Nationaux's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nightprowler10 View Post
    Love in the Time of Cholera might not be the most accessible, though I still haven't read it. You might find 100 Years of Solitude an easier read.

    Finished Zealot which was interesting. I don't think is presenting anything new here but I do like the way he connected all the dots and I totally enjoyed his descriptions of the Jewish customs at the time around the Temple. Good read.

    Read quickly though Lord of the Flies as well. Not sure what to say about something that is so referenced in popular culture. It is what you expect it to be but the words are delivered powerfully. The symbolism is at times on the nose but it never detracts from the story itself. Very good read.

    Still ignoring the books I have on the shelf... and bought Germs, Guns, and Steel by Jared Diamond. It is a study of human societies' evolution in order to theorize why it was the Eurasian and North African peoples throughout history that have largely been the conquerors and enslavers of Native Americans / Africans that forever influenced the world as we know it and not the other way around. There's a lot more to what he's theorizing about than just that, but you get the gist. I'm only about 10% into it but a very interesting read so far, and very tough to put down.
    If you want to know more about the European miracle and why it was Europe that developed before anyone else, read Paul Kennedy's book, "The rise and fall of the great powers - Economic change and military conflict from 1500 to 2000".

    An excellent book that delves into the development of the world.
    Quote Originally Posted by BoyBrumby View Post
    Yeah, look, it gives me a pain deep inside my uterus to admit it, but it's Ajmal until such time as we get a working throwing law again.
    Never in a million years would I have thought Brumby to admit this!!!!!!

  15. #1815
    Global Moderator nightprowler10's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Agent Nationaux View Post
    If you want to know more about the European miracle and why it was Europe that developed before anyone else, read Paul Kennedy's book, "The rise and fall of the great powers - Economic change and military conflict from 1500 to 2000".

    An excellent book that delves into the development of the world.
    That sounds good and all, but Diamond goes back like 10,000 years to try and dissect history for this purpose. I'll give it a read if I find this unsatisfactory.



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