cricket betting betway blog banner small
Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 71
Like Tree25Likes

Thread: ‘Sophia’ - the World’s First Robot to be Granted Citizenship Status

  1. #31
    Spanish_Vicente sledger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Elm, he do brood. And Oak, he do hate. But the Willow-man goes walking, If you stays out late.
    Posts
    41,006
    So it has more rights than an unborn child. ITSTL.

  2. #32
    Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    9,851
    ‘Awakens’ is a bit if a stretch but still a facinating pro-mo interview by the ‘Creator’....


  3. #33
    Global Moderator Spark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    A Blood Rainbow
    Posts
    48,021
    Quote Originally Posted by sledger View Post
    So it has more rights than an unborn child. ITSTL.
    sledger casually rolling in with the red-hot take
    do you think people will be allowed to make violins?
    who's going to make the violins?

    forever 63*

  4. #34
    Global Moderator Spark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    A Blood Rainbow
    Posts
    48,021
    You Will Lose Your Job to a Robot?and Sooner Than You Think ? Mother Jones

    In other words, the advances to focus on aren’t those in robotic engineering—though they are happening, too—but the way we’re hurtling toward artificial intelligence, or AI. While we’re nowhere near human-level AI yet, the progress of the past couple of decades has been stunning. After many years of nothing much happening, suddenly robots can play chess better than the best grandmaster. They can play Jeopardy! better than the best humans. They can drive cars around San Francisco—and they’re getting better at it every year. They can recognize faces well enough that Welsh police recently made the first-ever arrest in the United Kingdom using facial recognition software. After years of plodding progress in voice recognition, Google announced earlier this year that it had reduced its word error rate from 8.5 percent to 4.9 percent in 10 months.

    All of this is a sign that AI is improving exponentially, a product of both better computer hardware and software. Hardware has historically followed a growth curve called Moore’s law, in which power and efficiency double every couple of years, and recent improvements in software algorithms have been even more explosive. For a long time, these advances didn’t seem very impressive: Going from the brainpower of a bacterium to the brainpower of a nematode might technically represent an enormous leap, but on a practical level it doesn’t get us that much closer to true artificial intelligence. However, if you keep up the doubling for a while, eventually one of those doubling cycles takes you from the brainpower of a lizard (who cares?) to the brainpower of a mouse and then a monkey (wow!). Once that happens, human-level AI is just a short step away.

    This can be hard to imagine, so here’s a chart that shows what an exponential doubling curve looks like, measured in petaflops (quadrillions of calculations per second). During the first 70 years of the digital era, computing power doubled every couple of years—and that produced steadily improving accounting software, airplane reservation systems, weather forecasts, Spotify, and the like. But on the scale of the human brain—usually estimated at 10 to 50 petaflops—it produced computing power so minuscule that you can’t see any change at all. Around 2025 we’ll finally start to see visible progress toward artificial intelligence. A decade later we’ll be up to about one-tenth the power of a human brain, and a decade after that we’ll have full human-level AI. It will seem like it happened overnight, but it’s really the result of a century of steady—but mostly imperceptible—progress.
    Starting to wonder if machine learning really could be the catalyst for an industrial revolution level transformation of society.

    If that happens, literally every single political debate we are having here will be as relevant as debates on the divine right of kings was in the mid-19th century.

    In fact, it’s even worse. In addition to doing our jobs at least as well as we do them, intelligent robots will be cheaper, faster, and far more reliable than humans. And they can work 168 hours a week, not just 40. No capitalist in her right mind would continue to employ humans. They’re expensive, they show up late, they complain whenever something changes, and they spend half their time gossiping. Let’s face it: We humans make lousy laborers.

    If you want to look at this through a utopian lens, the AI Revolution has the potential to free humanity forever from drudgery. In the best-case scenario, a combination of intelligent robots and green energy will provide everyone on Earth with everything they need. But just as the Industrial Revolution caused a lot of short-term pain, so will intelligent robots. While we’re on the road to our Star Trek future, but before we finally get there, the rich are going to get richer—because they own the robots—and the rest of us are going to get poorer because we’ll be out of jobs. Unless we figure out what we’re going to do about that, the misery of workers over the next few decades will be far worse than anything the Industrial Revolution produced.
    We'll see if this plays out.
    Last edited by Spark; 30-10-2017 at 01:11 AM.


  5. #35
    International Captain StephenZA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    South Africa / UK
    Posts
    7,144
    Quote Originally Posted by Spark View Post
    You Will Lose Your Job to a Robot?and Sooner Than You Think ? Mother Jones

    Starting to wonder if machine learning really could be the catalyst for an industrial revolution level transformation of society.


    If that happens, literally every single political debate we are having here will be as relevant as debates on the divine right of kings was in the mid-19th century.

    We'll see if this plays out.
    It started long time ago, if you just got back to the 80's and see what jobs/skills were needed versus now... big difference. How many people still use a slide rule, and calculate what is required to build a road, versus the current CAD designers that now just put everything in place and let the computer work it out.... (as an anecdotal example). The thing is it is getting faster and faster and goverments have done little to tool people to change the way they think about their careers and/or help them later in life to find new skills.

    The question is, what will be the revolution? How in real terms will people actually cope with the changes? I cant see that... except people becoming so upset at losing jobs start rioting in the streets and prevent the progress. (not gonna happen).
    "Here are the opinions on which my facts are based." - Humanity
    "Man occasionally stumbles on the truth, but then just picks himself up and hurries on regardless." - Anonymous

  6. #36
    Global Moderator Spark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    A Blood Rainbow
    Posts
    48,021
    Machine learning is different. It's the anecdote about answering the why question--which, in qualitative terms, is not far removed from the ability to reason and learn--which struck me.

    But in real terms, if all the wealth is being produced by robots (capital) and no one has a job (i.e. labour's share of wealth is tiny), then Marxists would claim that this is the situation in which you would have a revolution. I have not yet seen a more convincing or, frankly, less depressing alternative yet.

  7. #37
    International Captain StephenZA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    South Africa / UK
    Posts
    7,144
    While machine learning is different... what is the real effect, it is going to take away current jobs and change the way society functions. But does that mean people will be sitting at home doing nothing? I dont think so, there is always 'new' jobs that have to be done as society changes. The question for me is are people capable of changing quickly enough to cope...

  8. #38
    Global Moderator Spark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    A Blood Rainbow
    Posts
    48,021
    Quote Originally Posted by StephenZA View Post
    While machine learning is different... what is the real effect, it is going to take away current jobs and change the way society functions. But does that mean people will be sitting at home doing nothing? I dont think so, there is always 'new' jobs that have to be done as society changes. The question for me is are people capable of changing quickly enough to cope...
    They'll definitely be doing something. Whether that something actually makes them enough money to maintain the standards of living they accept is a wildly different matter.

    This culture war nonsense consuming global politics right now is a furphy compared to this.

  9. #39
    vcs
    vcs is offline
    Hall of Fame Member vcs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    India
    Posts
    18,237
    People will probably start to realize the value of those pesky "useless in the real world" academic careers when it happens.
    Quote Originally Posted by benchmark00 View Post
    Chix love a man with a checkered posting history.

  10. #40
    Global Moderator Spark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    A Blood Rainbow
    Posts
    48,021
    Quote Originally Posted by vcs View Post
    People will probably start to realize the value of those pesky "useless in the real world" academic careers when it happens.
    Even then, though. There's a pretty substantial portion of science work which could honestly just be done by a really, really good robot, in terms of routine work. One would hope that STEM people are bright and adaptive enough to use that to their advantage.

  11. #41
    International Captain StephenZA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    South Africa / UK
    Posts
    7,144
    Quote Originally Posted by Spark View Post
    They'll definitely be doing something. Whether that something actually makes them enough money to maintain the standards of living they accept is a wildly different matter.

    This culture war nonsense consuming global politics right now is a furphy compared to this.
    100% ... its almost like the politicians are ignoring real issues to cater to the masses!

    Quote Originally Posted by Spark View Post
    Even then, though. There's a pretty substantial portion of science work which could honestly just be done by a really, really good robot, in terms of routine work. One would hope that STEM people are bright and adaptive enough to use that to their advantage.
    .... there goes my job...

  12. #42
    International Captain StephenZA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    South Africa / UK
    Posts
    7,144
    Quote Originally Posted by Spark View Post
    . Whether that something actually makes them enough money to maintain the standards of living they accept is a wildly different matter.
    The market has to have a 'minimum' wage because you cant sell service or goods that nobody can afford, so it becomes a little cyclic... it is hugely difficult to predict though and could bring a class war about.

  13. #43
    vcs
    vcs is offline
    Hall of Fame Member vcs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    India
    Posts
    18,237
    Quote Originally Posted by Spark View Post
    Even then, though. There's a pretty substantial portion of science work which could honestly just be done by a really, really good robot, in terms of routine work. One would hope that STEM people are bright and adaptive enough to use that to their advantage.
    Quote Originally Posted by StephenZA View Post
    100% ... its almost like the politicians are ignoring real issues to cater to the masses!

    .... there goes my job...
    LOL, reminds me of one of those "The BIg Bang Theory" episodes.

    Raj - He watched me work for 10 minutes and starting designing a piece of software that could replace me
    Leonard - Is that even possible?
    Raj - As it turns out, yes..

  14. #44
    Global Moderator Spark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    A Blood Rainbow
    Posts
    48,021
    Quote Originally Posted by StephenZA View Post
    The market has to have a 'minimum' wage because you cant sell service or goods that nobody can afford, so it becomes a little cyclic... it is hugely difficult to predict though and could bring a class war about.
    Which would be a staggeringly awful thing, because one would assume that most of the weapons are automated too.

  15. #45
    International Captain StephenZA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    South Africa / UK
    Posts
    7,144
    Quote Originally Posted by Spark View Post
    Which would be a staggeringly awful thing, because one would assume that most of the weapons are automated too.
    Apparently not..!! Because it is unaffordable to replace. Report: U.S. Nuclear System Relies On Outdated Technology Such As Floppy Disks : The Two-Way : NPR (tongue in cheek).

Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast


Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. The next nation to be granted Test status
    By Tricia McMillan in forum Cricket Chat
    Replies: 65
    Last Post: 12-12-2013, 09:15 AM
  2. DoG’s Top 100 Test Batsmen - Bowling Discussion
    By Days of Grace in forum Cricket Chat
    Replies: 121
    Last Post: 22-09-2013, 09:22 PM
  3. Replies: 32
    Last Post: 28-01-2008, 05:47 AM
  4. Most ‘farcical’ finish to a cricket match
    By pasag in forum Cricket Chat
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: 04-12-2007, 04:44 PM
  5. Stuart Law granted British citizenship
    By Crazy Sam in forum Cricket Chat
    Replies: 77
    Last Post: 01-02-2005, 05:04 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •