Page 8 of 8 FirstFirst ... 678
Results 106 to 120 of 120
Like Tree14Likes

Thread: The European Politics Thread

  1. #106
    Eternal Optimist / Cricket Web Staff Member GIMH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    SWA
    Posts
    57,599
    Quote Originally Posted by Uppercut View Post
    Yeah it's one of those countries that the anti-government crowd have to pretend doesn't exist to sustain their ideology.
    Terrible post.

  2. #107
    Request Your Custom Title Now! Uppercut's Avatar
    Tournaments Won: 1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    .
    Posts
    27,383
    Quote Originally Posted by hendrix View Post
    And vice versa, to be honest. The socialists don't have much to stand on either when it's mainly liberal economics that has delivered for them.
    Haha yeah for sure.

  3. #108
    Request Your Custom Title Now! Flem274*'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    BJ Watling's luxurious curls
    Posts
    36,474
    Quote Originally Posted by Uppercut View Post
    Yeah it's one of those countries that the anti-government crowd have to pretend doesn't exist to sustain their ideology.
    Quote Originally Posted by hendrix View Post
    And vice versa, to be honest. The socialists don't have much to stand on either when it's mainly liberal economics that has delivered for them.
    so germany is the perfect country?
    Quote Originally Posted by Bahnz View Post
    I need u like Henry Nicholls needs batting school
    He was terrible in that series
    I need u like Ross Taylor needed to be fit
    He's way better than Henry Nicholls
    And now all I can think about is your smile
    and that ****** test series too
    Losing to Australia sucked and I miss you
    Proudly supporting Central Districts
    RIP Craig Walsh

  4. #109
    Request Your Custom Title Now! Top_Cat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Marburg, Germany
    Posts
    25,735
    It isn't. But it's pretty good.

    The healthcare here seems to be emblematic of Hendrix's point. It's not good because it's some socialist scheme, believe me you pay for it. 80 EUR/month for public cover (Krankenversicherung) and it's only that cheap because I'm a student. For context, that's more than I paid per month for private cover in Oz. Once you're a working stiff, it bumps to ~200 EUR/month (Vimes to confirm). The medical care itself ain't perfect either. After a certain income level (60K I think) you can access private cover too.

    Same with other public services. They're there (unemployment insurance, etc.) and you're definitely paying for them. Only need to look at the number of deductions from your take-home pay. I'm sure there are always efficiencies you can add to a system like this but, generally, it's low stress and smooth, no bill shock is nice.
    Last edited by Top_Cat; 07-10-2017 at 06:58 AM.


  5. #110
    Cricketer Of The Year watson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    9,669
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan View Post
    I read that as watson implying that nationalism is the vanguard of progressivism, tbh.

    ‘Nationalism’ is the old textbook political term. ‘Heimet’ or home-land is the new term which has resonated with how Western people think and feel. Consequently the idea of ‘Heimet’ is driving the political agenda from the grassroots up.

    Mainsteam German politicians have been the first to recognise this and speak about it responsibly and constructively. In the Anglo-sphere we are still stuck in the old paradigm where it is assumed that the inherent and natural desire for ‘Heimet’ is overwhelmingly bad. The reality is way more complicated than that and goes right to the heart of what it means to be human at the most fundamental level.
    01. Adam Gilchrist 02. Sachin Tendulka 03. Virat Kohli 04. Viv Richards 05. AB de Villiers 06. Andrew Symonds 07. Lance Klusener 08. Richard Hadlee 09. Wasim Akram 10. Joel Garner 11. Muttiah Muralithran

  6. #111
    Hall of Fame Member superkingdave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Manchester
    Posts
    19,448
    Currently heading back from Girona to Barcelona, will be an interesting night if there is an UDI.

  7. #112
    Cricketer Of The Year watson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    9,669
    The age of Kurz is an important factor. The new political tsunami is not a movement of the old, but of the young who are looking to their future.


    Austrian conservative set to become world's youngest leader

    Austria's conservative People's Party, led by 31-year-old Sebastian Kurz, is set to win the country's general election, projections suggest.

    The victory would make Mr Kurz the world's youngest national leader.
    The People's Party was set to win more than 31%. It is so far unclear whether the Social Democrats or the far-right Freedom Party will finish second.

    Short of a majority, Mr Kurz's party could seek an alliance with the anti-immigration Freedom Party.....

    Sebastian Kurz: Austrian conservative set to become world's youngest leader - BBC News
    Last edited by watson; 15-10-2017 at 05:45 PM.

  8. #113
    Cricketer Of The Year watson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    9,669
    With May among the walking dead, Macron locked in a battle with the Unions, and Merkel about to cross an ADf political minefield the hegemony of Old Europe is about to get less hegemonic. And it’s all their own fault.

    The Austrian elections should terrify Europeans

    ....Austria's lurch to the right flies in the face of a hopeful, short-lived apparent backlash against the far right's advances in Europe. In French and Dutch votes, nationalists fell short of expectations. In Austria itself last year, a liberal candidate narrowly beat the Freedom Party's frontman for the country's presidency.

    But these victories now appear as interim events.

    Austria's swing to the right is particularly worrisome in light of its Central European neighbors' rightward tilts and their opposition to the kind of liberal, more tightly integrated EU envisioned by Merkel and Emmanuel Macron of France.

    If a conservative-far right government emerges in Austria, which is likely but not certain, the coalition would certainly breathe wind into the sails of the post-communist nations such as Poland, Hungary, Croatia and others that, in general, bristle under Brussels' curbs on state sovereignty and, specifically, the imperative to accept and integrate refugees. Austria would find itself closer in its affinities to Victor Orban's Hungary than to Merkel's Germany.

    Austria was an outlier in 2000, brushing aside criticism to take the Freedom Party into the government. Kurz would be going a step further if he resurrects the alliance today. Europe's identity and the EU's survival are on the line, something even the young Mr. Kurz must certainly understand.

    The Austrian elections should terrify Europeans (opinion) - CNN
    Last edited by watson; 18-10-2017 at 05:51 AM.

  9. #114
    Why is it automatically implied by many 'news' sites that political moves to the right are bad, but there's no such 'worry' over moves to the left.

    Left-leaning politics rapidly become catastrophically bad the further you move left. As you move further right the politics are more insular, but that is not intrinsically bad for the country. May be bad for particular sub-sections, but there are winners and losers with any politics.

    Mainstream left wing politics seems to be a fantasy world where virtue signalling ideology trumps reality, where unicorns and rainbows triumph over villainy.

  10. #115
    Spanish_Vicente sledger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Elm, he do brood. And Oak, he do hate. But the Willow-man goes walking, If you stays out late.
    Posts
    41,005
    You say that as if people haven't been saying the exact same thing for many many years now.

  11. #116
    Evil Scotsman Furball's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    514
    Posts
    29,328
    Quote Originally Posted by Scaly piscine View Post
    Why is it automatically implied by many 'news' sites that political moves to the right are bad, but there's no such 'worry' over moves to the left.

    Left-leaning politics rapidly become catastrophically bad the further you move left. As you move further right the politics are more insular, but that is not intrinsically bad for the country. May be bad for particular sub-sections, but there are winners and losers with any politics.

    Mainstream left wing politics seems to be a fantasy world where virtue signalling ideology trumps reality, where unicorns and rainbows triumph over villainy.
    You're right, I can't believe this was never brought up during the election campaign.
    ​63*

    Quote Originally Posted by Howe_zat View Post
    Come on Lancashire!
    Quote Originally Posted by Jono View Post
    Let it be known for the record that the font in the top of the picture noted that Kohli was wearing Jimmy Choo shoes and Happy Socks

  12. #117
    Hall of Fame Member grecian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    The Right Side of History
    Posts
    19,476
    Quote Originally Posted by sledger View Post
    Grecian's pals over at "the state" performing admirably here.

    Down with this sort of thing.
    Just seen this, and I know unsolicited attacks on me is now part of the "news and politics" section, but this one, liked by Gimh of course is particularly perplexing.

    Last I looked The Peoples Party were one of those pro-austerity, pro government cuts type parties which I'm generally not on the side of, but

    ho-hum.
    Do I contradict myself?
    Very well then I contradict myself,
    (I am large, I contain multitudes.
    Walt Whitman

  13. #118
    Spanish_Vicente sledger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Elm, he do brood. And Oak, he do hate. But the Willow-man goes walking, If you stays out late.
    Posts
    41,005
    Seriousness. Self. Take. Less.

  14. #119
    Eternal Optimist / Cricket Web Staff Member GIMH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    SWA
    Posts
    57,599
    Quote Originally Posted by grecian View Post
    Just seen this, and I know unsolicited attacks on me is now part of the "news and politics" section, but this one, liked by Gimh of course is particularly perplexing.

    Last I looked The Peoples Party were one of those pro-austerity, pro government cuts type parties which I'm generally not on the side of, but

    ho-hum.
    In fairness my like was more about the attack on the state than you. I don’t take our clashes in here personally

  15. #120
    Cricketer Of The Year watson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    9,669
    An interesting article from the NY Times that turns the current definition of Liberalism on its head. Or at least points out that the contemporary version of Liberalism is not real Liberalism but merely a conglomeration of ’60s-era intellectual cartels that control the commanding heights of culture‘. (what a fabulous turn of phrase)


    Angela Merkel’s Failure May Be Just What Europe Needs

    .........For all the understandable talk about the crisis of Western liberalism, the political chaos of the last few years has also demonstrated that many supposed agents of post-liberalism are unready to really push the liberal order to the breaking point.

    President Trump is a political weakling, not a Caesar; Marine Le Pen can’t break 35 percent of France’s presidential vote; the Islamic State has all-but-fallen. Which means that the custodians of the liberal order, the kind of people wringing their hands over Merkel’s present struggles, still have an opportunity to prove their critics wrong, to show that their worldview is more adaptable to changed circumstances than it has seemed.

    I’m not sure they’re ready for that adaptation; instead, my sense of the state of Western elites after Trump and Brexit is similar to the analysis offered recently by Michael Brendan Dougherty in National Review. Dougherty has been circulating in high-level confabs since Trump’s election and reports a persistent mood of entitlement and ’90s nostalgia — a refusal to take responsibility for foreign policy failures, to admit that post-national utopianism was oversold, to reckon with the social decay and spiritual crisis shadowing the cosmopolitan dream.

    Indeed, all the high-level agita surrounding Germany’s political crisis — good heavens, not a minority government! — suggests a basic deficiency of elite imagination that will be one of the things that brings down the liberal order if it does eventually fall.

    But while it’s possible that a Bourbon Restoration scenario awaits, in which our overclass learns nothing and forgets nothing during the Trumpian disruption, there is something mildly encouraging in the willingness of Merkel’s competitors in the political center, not just on the extreme right, to act as though they’ve learned lessons from her high-minded blunder, and to campaign and negotiate as if the public’s opinions about migration policy should actually prevail. Better that kind of crisis-generating move by far, in fact, than a grand coalition of parties united only in their anti-populism, and perfectly designed to ratify the populist critique that all the elites are in cahoots.

    What will save the liberal order, if it is to be saved, will be the successful integration of concerns that its leaders have dismissed or ignored back into normal political debate, an end to what Josh Barro of Business Insider has called “no-choice politics,” in which genuine ideological pluralism is something to be smothered with a pillow.

    In Angela Merkel’s Europe right now, that should mean making peace with Brexit, ceasing to pursue ever further political centralization by undemocratic means, breaking up the ’60s-era intellectual cartels that control the commanding heights of culture, creating space for religious resistance to the lure of nihilism and suicide — and accepting that the days of immigration open doors are over, and the careful management of migrant flows is a central challenge for statesmen going forward.

    But a necessary first step, in the country that really rules the continent, would be for more people to recognize that if Merkel’s long rule is threatened it need not be a sign of liberalism in crisis, but rather an indicator that it could yet be restored to health.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/22/o...ion-columnists

    And to think that a Nigel Farage dream supported by millions of voters from the heartland of England and Wales started a cultural revolution that is slowly but surely reshaping the Western World.

    It hasn’t quite reached Australia yet because we happen to be a bit slow. But it will.
    Last edited by watson; 24-11-2017 at 06:16 AM.

Page 8 of 8 FirstFirst ... 678


Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. The Australian politics thread
    By Slow Love™ in forum News and Politics
    Replies: 18305
    Last Post: Today, 11:15 AM
  2. *Official* European Football Thread 2008-09
    By Pratters in forum General Sports Forum
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 13-09-2009, 07:57 AM
  3. The Indian Politics Thread
    By Pratters in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 08-09-2009, 03:33 AM
  4. US politics thread
    By silentstriker in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 92
    Last Post: 26-01-2009, 03:23 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •