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Thread: Tony Greig

  1. #31
    International Vice-Captain The Battlers Prince's Avatar
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    Not my meaning at all. Moreso just Greig's batting approach to very fast bowlers was a bit like Bell's.. Which is odd as KP seemed to be the most unflappable but had a far more direct and powerful approach which is what I imagine Greigy was like to most other bowlers.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lillian Thomson View Post
    Presumably because he only played for 6 years. Longevity has always been supremely overrated on CW.
    Greig played Tests for 5-and-a-half years - i.e. 6 English summers, 5 overseas winters.
    Comparing the obvious 3 players their best comparable period:

    Greig: 3599@40, 141@32 (1972-1977)
    Botham: 2996@38, 249@23 (1977-1982)
    Flintoff: 2801@38. 166@30 (2003-2008)

    On those figures I'd put Greig a little ahead of Flintoff (he played more matches in the time, and was a more versatile bowler), with Botham well ahead of them both.
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  3. #33
    International Coach SeamUp's Avatar
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    One of my dad's proudest moments - getting his picture taken with Tony Greig for the newspaper as they travelled up for Nuffield Week circa 63-64. Spoke highly of both.
    Last edited by SeamUp; 15-10-2017 at 01:05 PM.
    LILLEE c WILLEY b DILLEY

    LAMB c KOURIE b RICE

  4. #34
    Cricket Web: All-Time Legend flibbertyjibber's Avatar
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    Before my time but he has numbers that stack up. Maybe the fact he was basically replaced by Botham does him harm, if we had had a spell like we had when Botham left the side or should have left the side as he was past it but was replaced by useless fodder then he may have been thought of more highly.


  5. #35
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    greig wasn't in that list because i had to limit it at some point and i chose 18 to be the number i stopped at. You can see what happens when I put too big a list up, the 25 player ODI all rounders thread has come to screeching halt.
    cricket rules brah

  6. #36
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    There's an odd quote from Greig about what he claims to have said to Packer when signing up for WSC in 1977: "Ian Botham is going to be a great player and there won’t be room in the England Test side for both of us."

    Besides the fact that Botham hadn't played a Test at that point, at the time he looked like being (and for the first year or two he was) an opening/first-change bowler who would be a useful #7 or even #8 bat, while Greig was a #5 or #6 bat and useful 4th seamer/spinner. It would have been like S Africa deciding there wasn't room for both Kallis and Shaun Pollock.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by vcs View Post


    Loved that commentary. Allrounders do look like they love adding strings to their bow, with some of the best commentators being allrounders. Richie Benaud, Tony Greig and might I daresay, Shastri.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrewB View Post
    There's an odd quote from Greig about what he claims to have said to Packer when signing up for WSC in 1977: "Ian Botham is going to be a great player and there won’t be room in the England Test side for both of us."

    Besides the fact that Botham hadn't played a Test at that point, at the time he looked like being (and for the first year or two he was) an opening/first-change bowler who would be a useful #7 or even #8 bat, while Greig was a #5 or #6 bat and useful 4th seamer/spinner. It would have been like S Africa deciding there wasn't room for both Kallis and Shaun Pollock.
    As much as I loved watching Greig in the 70’s, a lot of his reminiscing is extremely fanciful. I doubt whether he said that to Packer. WSC for Greig was about financially securing the future of his family. They all did it for personal gain. The fact that cricketers became better paid as a a result was obviously good for everyone, but wasn’t the reason the participants took part.
    England’s batting at that time was paper thin and Greig would still have been the second name pencilled into the batting line-up (after Sir Geoffrey) irrespective of Botham.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrewB View Post
    Greig played Tests for 5-and-a-half years - i.e. 6 English summers, 5 overseas winters.
    Comparing the obvious 3 players their best comparable period:

    Greig: 3599@40, 141@32 (1972-1977)
    Botham: 2996@38, 249@23 (1977-1982)
    Flintoff: 2801@38. 166@30 (2003-2008)


    On those figures I'd put Greig a little ahead of Flintoff (he played more matches in the time, and was a more versatile bowler), with Botham well ahead of them both.

    Greig was still the better No.6 batsman and more likely to make a big score against quality bowling. Mainly because he had the technique to construct an innings rather than just blaze away.

    Botham and Flintoff are only better than Greig in the context of Bowling-Allrounder. But both are not really good enough to warrant nudging Trueman, Larwood or Snow out of an English ATG side IMO.
    Last edited by watson; 18-10-2017 at 05:01 AM.
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  10. #40
    The artist formerly known as Monk Red Hill's Avatar
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    Prime Botham was something else though. Greig was a guy who got the most out of his ability. As a batsman he was a grafter and a glancer, and as a bowler he was handy at best.

    Botham was a true force. The guy played a decade too long, but the Botham that should be remembered is the early era Botham. Pre mullet. Great, proper, orthodox batsman with immense power, and a brilliant swing bowler. Forget the meme about Botham got a lot of wickets with **** balls (he did later in his career when he was fat) but the guy took a hell of a lot of wickets with great bowling early on.

    The guy was a force in this match...

    3rd Test, Australia tour of England at Leeds, Jul 16-21 1981 | Match Summary | ESPNCricinfo
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  11. #41
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    So not only did Greig bat like Ian Bell he was also a grafter. Hmmmmmm.........

  12. #42
    Request Your Custom Title Now! Burgey's Avatar
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    We reallyshould have taken Doug Walters on that tour once GC declined to tour. His record in England was pus but hed apparently made some technical adjustments in the summer before and was coming off a decent home summer. Fifteen minutes of him at Leeds would have been handy, and the batting was very skinny save for Hughes and TOTAB.

  13. #43
    State Vice-Captain jcas0167's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrewB View Post
    Greig played Tests for 5-and-a-half years - i.e. 6 English summers, 5 overseas winters.
    Comparing the obvious 3 players their best comparable period:

    Greig: 3599@40, 141@32 (1972-1977)
    Botham: 2996@38, 249@23 (1977-1982)
    Flintoff: 2801@38. 166@30 (2003-2008)

    On those figures I'd put Greig a little ahead of Flintoff (he played more matches in the time, and was a more versatile bowler), with Botham well ahead of them both.
    Yes, although look at the names in the Australian teams in the late 70's that Botham played compared to those in the teams that Greig faced. Not really an apples with apples comparison.
    Last edited by jcas0167; 18-10-2017 at 08:04 PM.

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcas0167 View Post
    Yes, although look at the names in the Australian teams in the late 70's that Botham played compared to those in the teams that Greig faced. Not really an apples with apples comparison.
    OTOH, the West Indies attack against Botham was 4 from Holding, Roberts, Garner, Marshall, Croft; for about half the time Greig was playing against them the opening pair was two from Holder, Boyce and Julien.

  15. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Red Hill View Post
    Prime Botham was something else though. Greig was a guy who got the most out of his ability. As a batsman he was a grafter and a glancer, and as a bowler he was handy at best.

    Botham was a true force. The guy played a decade too long, but the Botham that should be remembered is the early era Botham. Pre mullet. Great, proper, orthodox batsman with immense power, and a brilliant swing bowler. Forget the meme about Botham got a lot of wickets with **** balls (he did later in his career when he was fat) but the guy took a hell of a lot of wickets with great bowling early on.

    The guy was a force in this match...

    3rd Test, Australia tour of England at Leeds, Jul 16-21 1981 | Match Summary | ESPNCricinfo
    I don’t remember Greig being a ‘grafter and a glancer’ at all. Like Botham he always looked to attack the bowling - it’s just that he was more measured.

    But yes, if his batting is generally under-rated, then his bowling is typically over-rated. Unless it was overcast, or the pitch had some bounce in it which suited his height then he was sometimes cannon fodder for batsman of class.

    Here is Greig consistently crashing Lillee and Walker through the covers, or hitting them to the midwicket boundary.


    Last edited by watson; 19-10-2017 at 03:28 AM.

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