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Thread: Was spin bowling once an easier art?

  1. #16
    U19 Vice-Captain Ford_GTHO351's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Richard
    If you try to attack spin when the ball is turning, meanwhile, the chances are you'll pay for it sooner rather than later, so I don't think attacking batting has made potentially good bowlers less so.
    I can understand your point of view.

    Though say these days with batsmen being more agressive and looking to score runs on almost every single ball, some spin bowlers for example in this situation may attempt to bowl the flipper and instead it may come out of the hand wrong or that they may bowl a full toss and it gets whacked for six.

    Turn back time say some 35 years ago or more and there was no such thing as ODI's and the pressures that spin bowlers must be under these days, especially if they are bowling at the death in ODI's with batsmen looking to whack you every single ball, it does affect sipinners performances.

    So I think that attacking batting has some part in affecting perfomances of current or past spinners.

  2. #17
    Cricket Web Staff Member Richard's Avatar
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    Bad deliveries (ie bad deliveries to any batsmen, eg Full-Tosses at 50 mph) have nearly always had maximum punishment aimed at them.
    Perhaps more batsmen are using their feet nowadays than used to (ie turning good deliveries into bad ones) and perhaps "Long-Hop length" is a little wider in dimension now than it used to be.
    But none of this, IMO, changes the fact that if the ball is turning use of feet is fraught with danger and will almost invariably result in downfall before too long, and that turning short-balls are much harder to hit than non-turning balls of identical length.
    On the occasions when you do get turning wickets (eg in Sri Lanka) good bowlers are still getting figures as good as in the '50s and '60s.
    Look at Harbhajan in the famous 2000\01 Border-Gavaskar Trophy. The Australians tried to attack him as much as anyone and he got 28 wickets in the last 2 Tests. They often paid for their aggressiveness; he bowled well and their aggressiveness didn't stop him.
    IMO if spin-friendly conditions occurred with the same regularity now as in the '50s and '60s, more aggressive batsmen would in fact mean spinners would get better figures rather than worse.
    Perhaps increased strokeplay has worsened the figures of a routine fingerspinner caused by less spin-friendly wickets, but it wouldn't have created that effect in itself.
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  3. #18
    Cricket Web Staff Member Richard's Avatar
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    Originally posted by FRAZ
    And you know why Subcontinent spinners are good. Coz of their natural thin and FLEXIBLE wrist . And actually their fingers also are thin and so their grip is firm and placement of fingers is very flexible . Not me saying only The experts do say this thing also ... right ?
    The renowned experts.
    Who's to say you're any less of an expert than anyone of renown?
    But I don't think subcontinental people are especially likely to be better spin-bowlers than those from elsewhere. If you ask me there's no reason to suspect geography would effect thin, flexible fingers and wrists.
    If you ask me subcontinental teams produce effective spinners most often because they produce more spin-friendly wickets than anywhere else. No other reason.

  4. #19
    School Boy/Girl Cricketer someblokedave's Avatar
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    In the case of Wrist Spinners - Grimmett for instance, he was an innovator and technically brilliant. The bloke practiced virtually every day of his life into his 80's and would only end his practice sessions if he landed the ball 5 times consecutively on a small hankie. You've got to remember these blokes lived for cricket and weren't consumed with their own self image in the same way as the ***** these days are, what with their Twitter accounts, mobile phones and playing computer games.

    Are these threads really as dead as this - is there anyone out there?


  5. #20
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    Weird bump.

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