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Thread: The ATG Teams General arguing/discussing thread

  1. #361
    International Vice-Captain Monk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by watson View Post
    Here's a turn up for the books;

    According to Stat's Guru Warne and MacGill played together in 16 Test matches. Here are the stat's for those 16 matches;

    MacGill
    Wickets = 82
    Average = 22.10
    Strike Rate = 41.7
    5w = 5
    10w = 1

    Bowling records | Test matches | Cricinfo Statsguru | ESPN Cricinfo

    Warne
    Wickets = 74
    Average = 29.56
    Strike Rate = 56.6
    5w = 6
    10w = 2

    Bowling records | Test matches | Cricinfo Statsguru | ESPN Cricinfo

    It appears that MacGill out-bowled Warne when they appeared together. Unless I'm missing something.
    Nah, this was known at the time, and spoken about a bit in the media.

    Warne was, from a marketers perspective, the dream cricketer. He was also the incumbent, which meant MacGill only got to play when Warne was injured or banned, or if the track was a raging turner.

    I recall a Sydney test when selectors picked Watson at 6 as an all-rounder, third seamer, so that Warne and MacGill could play together. Could have been done more, especially with Gilchrist in the team. But, we were thrashing teams anyhow.

    Had MacGill not been around at the same time as Warne, he'd have a far greater legacy. As it is, he is remembered as the second stringer to a legend. He deserves far more than that imo.

  2. #362
    International Vice-Captain watson's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Flametree;2918781]
    Quote Originally Posted by watson View Post
    The object of a Test match is to capture 20 wickets, therefore the bowlers Strike Rate is more significant than the Economy Rate or Average;
    /QUOTE]

    I don't buy this.

    If strike rate is the be-all of test bowlers, you'll presumably pick MacGill ahead of Warne?
    No I wouldn't because there are a number of other factors involved. Warne had an impact on the art of leg-spin bowling, and it's profile within Test cricket that MacGill could not match.

    The same applies to Mailey. His ability to spin batsman out relatively quickly, and at an average (V England) similar to Grimmett is only half the story.

    A king without a crown

    By RC Robertson Glasgow

    Biographies and essays have been written about celebrities, fools, crooks, bores, and exhibitionists; but, so far as I know, no one has written a short book (he'd never stand for a long one) on Arthur A. Mailey, one of the great personalities of the last fifty or sixty years.

    That he played cricket, as a leg-break-cum-googly bowler for New South Wales and Australia, is merely incidental. As a Test Match bowler, he ranks among the great. But, as a man, he already stands, for those who have had the wonderful luck to know him, among the immortals........

    I fear we may not see Arthur Mailey over here in the 1964 summer. He is 75 years old, and has retired from the work of commentary and drawing. But, wherever he is, he will, I know, be encouraging the young and hopeful, and helping the old and despairing. Anyhow, for me, Arthur Mailey is the greatest man I've ever met in cricket. A king without a crown.

    A king without a crown | Cricket Features | The Cricketer | ESPN Cricinfo
    Tendulkar - M.Waugh - Ponting - Richards - Dhoni - Bevan - Kapil Dev - Hadlee - Akram - Garner - Muralitharan

  3. #363
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    But then you could look at Grimmett in the same way - his variations and the new angle he brought to leg spin bowling was just as reforming as Mailey.

    He purportedly never bowled a wide or no ball in 73,987 FC deliveries. Pretty special. Plus he averaged 6 wickets per Test, and was the first to reach 200 Test wickets.
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    International Vice-Captain Monk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rvd619323 View Post
    He purportedly never bowled a wide or no ball in 73,987 FC deliveries.
    Incredible if true.


  5. #365
    International Vice-Captain watson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rvd619323 View Post
    But then you could look at Grimmett in the same way - his variations and the new angle he brought to leg spin bowling was just as reforming as Mailey.

    He purportedly never bowled a wide or no ball in 73,987 FC deliveries. Pretty special. Plus he averaged 6 wickets per Test, and was the first to reach 200 Test wickets.
    Now we're getting silly. That has to be a statistical impossibility. Surely?

  6. #366
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    The article on Grimmett here from Wisden Cricket Monthly is one of my favourite pieces of writing

    Clarrie Grimmett | Australia Cricket | Cricket Players and Officials | ESPN Cricinfo
    Oh for a strong arm and a walking stick

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    Cricket Web Staff Member fredfertang's Avatar
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    Not that it is of any great relevance but I suspect that Mailey might have bowled a little differently had he been the spinner in a side whose quick bowlers were, at best, Tim Wall and Ernie McCormick, rather than Ted MacDonald and Jack Gregory

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    Dan
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    Quote Originally Posted by watson View Post
    Now we're getting silly. That has to be a statistical impossibility. Surely?
    Clarrie Grimmett: The best ever spinner born in NZ on 25 December 1891 | The Roar

    Referenced there, presumably from Mallett's book.

    Additionally, I just found this paragraph, written by Grimmett's partner in crime, Bill O'Reilly.

    Unlike Arthur Mailey, the first of the Australian spin trilogy of the inter-wars era, Grimmett never insisted on spin as his chief means of destruction. To him it was no more than an important adjunct to unerring length and tantalising direction. Grimmett seldom beat a batsman by spin alone. Mailey often did. I cannot remember Grimmett bowling a long-hop, whereas Mailey averaged one an over. So much, in fact, did inaccuracy become a feature of Mailey's success that he himself came to believe that it was an essential ingredient. Such wantonness was anathema to Grimmett, who believed that a bowler should bowl as well as he possibly could every time he turned his arm over. And Grimmett was perhaps the best and most consistently active cricket thinker I ever met.

  9. #369
    International Vice-Captain watson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rvd619323 View Post
    Clarrie Grimmett: The best ever spinner born in NZ on 25 December 1891 | The Roar

    Referenced there, presumably from Mallett's book.

    Additionally, I just found this paragraph, written by Grimmett's partner in crime, Bill O'Reilly.
    The Roar doesn't appear to reference those 73,987 deliveries. I'm not saying that Grimmett never bowled a wide or no-ball, but commonsense suggests that to be highly unlikely. It's just stretching the ability of humanity too far.

    I respect O'Reilly's opinion, but again, 'I cannot remember Grimmett bowling a long-hop, whereas Mailey averaged one an over' sounds like wishful thinking to me. If Mailey really bowled a long-hop every over then he wouldn't have made it to the Australian Test squad. I don't recall even Peter Sleep or Bob Holland bowling long-hops regularly. Therefore, I don't see why such a practiced bowler as Mailey should be any different.

    Again, those averages per wicket against England are similar - 32.44 V 34.12

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    Quote Originally Posted by fredfertang View Post
    Not that it is of any great relevance but I suspect that Mailey might have bowled a little differently had he been the spinner in a side whose quick bowlers were, at best, Tim Wall and Ernie McCormick, rather than Ted MacDonald and Jack Gregory
    I was going to say something on those lines but decided against it :o))

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    Quote Originally Posted by That Article
    Most of these statistics are taken from Ashley Mallett’s excellent biography ‘Scarlet: Clarrie Grimmett- Test Cricketer’.
    Quote Originally Posted by 13 lines later
    As a measure of his control, Grimmett bowled 73,987 balls in first class cricket. He never bowled a wide or a no-ball.
    Guessing that's where it came from.

    I'm always going to maintain Grimmett was far, far superior. He had additional control and could build pressure to help O'Reilly take wickets galore, and he still averaged 6 per match himself.

    Worth noting, additionally, that the 1930s were generally characterised by flatter pitches than Mailey's slightly-earlier era.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rvd619323 View Post
    Guessing that's where it came from.

    I'm always going to maintain Grimmett was far, far superior. He had additional control and could build pressure to help O'Reilly take wickets galore, and he still averaged 6 per match himself.

    Worth noting, additionally, that the 1930s were generally characterised by flatter pitches than Mailey's slightly-earlier era.
    Awta very strongly

  13. #373
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    Quote Originally Posted by rvd619323 View Post
    Guessing that's where it came from.

    I'm always going to maintain Grimmett was far, far superior. He had additional control and could build pressure to help O'Reilly take wickets galore, and he still averaged 6 per match himself.

    Worth noting, additionally, that the 1930s were generally characterised by flatter pitches than Mailey's slightly-earlier era.
    'Far far superior' - No. That's hyperbole (or as our Prime Minister says, "hyper-bowl")

    Superior - Perhaps or yes.
    Last edited by watson; 16-09-2012 at 04:42 AM.

  14. #374
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    So, back to picking an opening partner for Hobbs, Sutcliffe or Hutton?
    Aus. XI
    Simpson^ | Hayden | Bradman | Chappell^ | Ponting | Border* | Gilchrist+ | Davidson3 | Warne4^ | Lillee1 | McGrath2


    W.I. XI
    Greenidge | Hunte | Richards^ | Headley* | Lara^ | Sobers5^ | Walcott+ | Marshall1 | Ambrose2 | Holding3 | Garner4

    S.A. XI
    Richards^ | Smith*^ | Amla | Pollock | Kallis5^ | Nourse | Waite+ | Procter3 | Steyn1 | Tayfield4 | Donald2

    Eng. XI
    Hobbs | Hutton*^ | Hammond^ | Compton | Barrington | Botham5^ | Knott | Trueman1 | Laker4 | Larwood2 | Barnes3

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    International Vice-Captain watson's Avatar
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    Sutcliffe with Hutton at No.5 as the defensive 'glue' in the middle-order - I reckon.

    If Hutton in the middle-order is too unpalatable then Hobbs and Hutton to open with Sutcliffe omitted. This is because Hutton is comfortably the better batsman (faced LIndwall and Miller) despite Sutcliffe's average.



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