Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234
Results 46 to 58 of 58

Thread: Underrated gems

  1. #46
    Global Moderator vic_orthdox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    25,082
    His shots as the innings progressed were awesome. Early on, the bowling was bad, but he got himself into a groove and started playing some great shots. The cut to get him to 50 was not a bad ball at all, and one of the pulls he played through wide mid-on would have been played on the front foot by most blokes.

  2. #47
    Global Moderator nightprowler10's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Madhouse on Madison
    Posts
    14,208
    RIP Craigos

  3. #48
    Cricketer Of The Year Anil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Tattooine
    Posts
    9,802
    Quote Originally Posted by Pigeon View Post
    no no...plus he lost his wicket, a clear example of choking...
    Quote Originally Posted by FRAZ View Post
    very very close friend of mine is an Arab Christian and he speaks Arabic too and the visible hidden filth shows the mentality which may never change .....
    Quote Originally Posted by FRAZ View Post
    AAooouchh !!!!!
    I still remember that zipper accident of mine when I was in kindergarten ..... (Thing is OK I repeat thing is OK now )!!!

  4. #49
    Cricket Web Staff Member Burgey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    The Castle
    Posts
    41,391
    Mike Selvey summed it up as a contribution to the game in his Guardian piece today:

    In reality, he knew that if the conditions pertained throughout (as they did) by rights this should have been a close, low-scoring encounter. It was neither a 102 all out pitch nor a 445 one. Against disciplined bowling a batsman was never truly in.

    This is a batsman of genius, though. Having got rid of England so quickly Australia, he knew, would be facing similar conditions with bowlers who ought to be conditioned to them. Steve Harmison got rid of Simon Katich, and in hostile manner. If England were not to be allowed to settle into a rhythm and chip away at the innings, a statement had to be made, a calculated risk taken, and in the company of Shane Watson it came from the captain. Watson marmalised James Anderson's opening deliveries and raced on, but when Ponting came to the crease at the end of the fourth over the opener sat back and watched.

    England broke ranks and discipline went. Harmison's first ball shaved his edge, and an attempted pull saw no contact. From then on he was merciless, hooking and cutting the attack to ribbons. It was a counterattack of the most thrilling kind and it took an exceptional player, knowing the risks, assessing the situation, and having the skill, confidence and sheer presence, to carry it out. By the time Stuart Broad pitched one up and had him lbw, the game was done.
    WWCC - Loyaulte Mi Lie
    "People make me happy.. not places.. people"

    "When a man is tired of London, he is tired of life." - Samuel Johnson

    "Hope is the fuel of progress and fear is the prison in which you put yourself" - Tony Benn


  5. #50
    Cricket Web: All-Time Legend Top_Cat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Adelaide, South Australia
    Posts
    23,117
    Love Ponting when he's in a brutal mood. I mean, when he's playing in the V, balls all the way along the carpet, late cut going nicely, etc. he's as classical a player as anyone but when he decides to take on an attack and really brutalise them, it's so good to watch. You really feel the violence in every shot. Must be galling when Ponting decides you're not good enough as a bowler to play nicely against.

    As many on here have noticed too, he's one of the best ever players at hitting a ton in the first Test of a series as a statement of intent too.
    The Colourphonics

    Bandcamp
    Twitderp

  6. #51
    International Debutant
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    NZ
    Posts
    2,040
    Nathan Astle's world record 222 against England at Christchurch. I reckon that is underrated and doesn't get the appreciation it deserves...it was simply the most phenomenal innings i've ever seen.

  7. #52
    Cricket Web: All-Time Legend Top_Cat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Adelaide, South Australia
    Posts
    23,117
    Astle's knock;

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EVL4210_FsY&NR=1

    And, keeping the NZ theme alive, Martin Crowe's ton in the first match of the 1992 WC was an absolute gem. Under-rated player, really.

    Chris Harris's 130 in 1996 was an immense knock too against a top-shelf attack. Aus never took him lightly again after that.
    Last edited by Top_Cat; 11-08-2009 at 03:28 AM.

  8. #53
    International Coach Ikki's Avatar
    Cricket Champion! Jackpot Champion!
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Death Queen Island
    Posts
    12,583
    Quote Originally Posted by Burgey View Post
    Mike Selvey summed it up as a contribution to the game in his Guardian piece today:

    In reality, he knew that if the conditions pertained throughout (as they did) by rights this should have been a close, low-scoring encounter. It was neither a 102 all out pitch nor a 445 one. Against disciplined bowling a batsman was never truly in.

    This is a batsman of genius, though. Having got rid of England so quickly Australia, he knew, would be facing similar conditions with bowlers who ought to be conditioned to them. Steve Harmison got rid of Simon Katich, and in hostile manner. If England were not to be allowed to settle into a rhythm and chip away at the innings, a statement had to be made, a calculated risk taken, and in the company of Shane Watson it came from the captain. Watson marmalised James Anderson's opening deliveries and raced on, but when Ponting came to the crease at the end of the fourth over the opener sat back and watched.

    England broke ranks and discipline went. Harmison's first ball shaved his edge, and an attempted pull saw no contact. From then on he was merciless, hooking and cutting the attack to ribbons. It was a counterattack of the most thrilling kind and it took an exceptional player, knowing the risks, assessing the situation, and having the skill, confidence and sheer presence, to carry it out. By the time Stuart Broad pitched one up and had him lbw, the game was done.
    Yeh, Sambit Bal and a good bit on it too:

    Cricinfo - Blogs - From the Editor - Ponting's was the innings that mattered
    Ponting's was the innings that mattered
    Marcus North was Man of the Match for his second hundred of the series, Michael Clarke scored more runs than him, and even Stuart Broad and Graeme Swann nearly scored as many but, for me, Ricky Pontingís was the innings of the match Ė and, arguably, even the innings of the series.

    Rightly, batsmen are judged not merely by the number of runs they produce but the quality of those runs. It was clear from the merry romp of Englandís ninth-wicket pair that batsmen can do plenty of things once the pressure has lifted. With nothing to lose, and nothing to fear, Broad and Swann were able to flay the same bowlers who terrorised their top-order colleagues for two successive days. Ponting, though, switched on his act when the match was still open.

    When a Test side gets bowled out for about a hundred runs on the first day, it is natural to assume that the conditions are tilted heavily towards the bowlers. Australia entered the match with a history of weakness against swing bowling. It cost them the series in 2005 and the Test at Lordís this summer, and when the ball swung for one session at Edgbaston they lost seven wickets for 77. In most cases, bowling your opponents out for 102 in the first innings is good enough win a Test, but only if your own batsmen donít perform as badly.

    Ponting had gone missing after a big hundred in his first appearance in the series, and the pitch at Cardiff was so benign that only six Australian wickets fell in 180 overs. In the previous innings, when Australia were in danger of losing the Test, he was bowled through the gate by an offspinner, the species that has troubled him throughout his career. And he came to the crease here after Steve Harmison, a man returning to the Ashes battle, had claimed an early wicket with a nasty, steepling ball that Simon Katich was forced to fend off in front his face. The first ball he faced from Harmison zipped through Pontingís bat and his body, not far from the inside edge.

    From here, Ponting produced 78 off 101 balls. At one point, he was 32 off 20 balls, with five fours and a six. It was thrilling, counter-attacking batting on a pitch that still had plenty for the bowlers. It can be argued that England bowled poorly to him but often a great batsman in supreme touch can have that effect on bowlers. By the time he was out Australia were ahead by 38 runs and would have had to bat like zombies to lose the Test from there.

    As the years roll by, the scorecard will reveal Pontingís contribution as one of the half-centuries in a match Australia utterly dominated. The truth is that it was the defining innings of the match. It had every ingredient that makes a great innings: counter-attack, supreme skills, the purest of strokes, and most of all, coming when it truly mattered.
    ★★★★★

  9. #54
    Cricketer Of The Year The Sean's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    London
    Posts
    7,518
    Vijay Hazare's performance in this match:

    4th Test: Australia v India at Adelaide, Jan 23-28, 1948 | Cricket Scorecard | Cricinfo.com

    His team were beaten by an innings, but Hazare's twin centuries in a losing cause against a great Australian side IMO ranks as one of the finest batting performances of the era.
    Member of the Twenty20 is Boring Society

    Quote Originally Posted by grecian View Post
    C'mon Man U.
    RIP Craigos

  10. #55
    International Captain
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    england
    Posts
    5,691
    Quote Originally Posted by Ikki View Post
    As the years roll by, the scorecard will reveal Pontingís contribution as one of the half-centuries in a match Australia utterly dominated. The truth is that it was the defining innings of the match. It had every ingredient that makes a great innings: counter-attack, supreme skills, the purest of strokes, and most of all, coming when it truly mattered.
    It's a shame the bowling was complete pants otherwise it would have been the full set.

  11. #56
    International Captain kingkallis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    India
    Posts
    5,902
    Quote Originally Posted by Xuhaib View Post
    Still consider this best 2-3 hours of batting I have ever seen, Azhar was even better then Sachin in that knock.
    It was the display of bizarre yet elegant yet entertaining hitting by Azhar in both series [ vs SAF in India and back in SAF as well ]
    CricZo XI - Draft League

    Season 1 M Hayden, G Gooch, R Dravid, W Hammond, K Pietersen, G Sobers, R Marsh (wk), R Benaud (c), D Steyn, W Hall, N Adcock

    Season 2 J Hobbs, B Richards, D Boon, H Taylor, C Lloyd (c), A Stewart (wk), T Goddard, A Davidson, H Tayfield, C Ambrose, H Griffith

    Season 3 H Sutcliffe, M Hayden, I Chappell (c), G Pollock, A Faulkner, M Hussey, D Lindsay (wk), I Botham, A Kumble, M Marshall, D Lillee

  12. #57
    Hall of Fame Member NUFAN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Marrickville
    Posts
    17,981
    Mark Greatbatch's 146* at Perth was an innings I loved as a kid, he just seemed to bat for ever!

    Trailing by almost 300 runs in the second innings, he gave a classic demonstration on how to save a Test against quality quicks Aldermann, Lawson, Hughes and Rackemann.

  13. #58
    Cricket Web Staff Member Richard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    2005
    Posts
    80,401
    NZ would still have lost if lost overs could be made-up TBF, but I suppose that made-up in a way for NZ being denied a 1-1 draw in 1987/88 when they had the last man out in the last Test and weren't given it.
    RD
    Appreciating cricket's greatest legend ever - HD Bird...............Funniest post (intentionally) ever.....Runner-up.....Third.....Fourth
    (Accidental) founder of Twenty20 Is Boring Society. Click and post to sign-up.
    chris.hinton: h
    FRAZ: Arshad's are a long gone stories
    RIP Fardin Qayyumi (AKA "cricket player"; "Bob"), 1/11/1990-15/4/2006

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234


Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Courtney Walsh: underrated great, all-time bowler?
    By Days of Grace in forum Cricket Chat
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: 15-12-2008, 05:21 PM
  2. Andrew Flintoff: Underrated
    By GIMH in forum Cricket Chat
    Replies: 53
    Last Post: 16-05-2008, 09:34 AM
  3. Mahela Jayawardene very underrated.
    By deira in forum Cricket Chat
    Replies: 59
    Last Post: 26-12-2007, 07:08 PM
  4. Underrated XI
    By RoyForPM in forum Cricket Chat
    Replies: 62
    Last Post: 24-03-2006, 01:33 PM
  5. Most underrated and overrated players in the world?
    By Nonentity in forum Cricket Chat
    Replies: 453
    Last Post: 12-03-2005, 05:50 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •