Cricket Betting Site Betway
Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst ... 567
Results 91 to 101 of 101

Thread: Baseball vs. Cricket

  1. #91
    State Captain Lostman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    1,946
    bonds, bonds, bonds, steroids, steroids im sick of hearing this crap for the last 3 years.
    Can we please get back to the most important thing happening in baseball right now?.
    Which is the yankees are only 5 games behind the blosuxs, we are in for another classic redsox choke
    This has a chance of being as legendery as the 1978 choke, only way it could get any better is if a boston massacre version 3.0 was mixed into it.
    For as long as there is limited overs cricket - of ten, twenty or fifty overs - there will remain the Sri Lankan spinners' mid-innings choke

  2. #92
    Hall of Fame Member Sanz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    16,230
    Quote Originally Posted by silentstriker View Post
    He did admit it, but it was in a courtroom under oath and thus baseball can't use it. And it helps because a ball that would otherwise be caught safely gets pushed 30 feet more and becomes a home run. Steroids also recuperation from playing and injuries, etc.
    As far as I remember, I dont think he admitted that he took Steroids. Bonds is still hitting those home runs and without steroids, So I dont think I will believe that he was hitting them over the park because of 'roids except for may be one season where he hit 73 HRs.

  3. #93
    International Coach adharcric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    San Francisco, California
    Posts
    10,898
    Steroids not only provide enhanced power and injury recovery but they can also help you hit better - just take a look at Barry's batting average soar in 2001 (.330, .370, .340, .360 - he's a career .300 hitter) at the age of 37. Either way, I will always look at him as a victim of the steroids era. Everyone knows that baseball has been full of steroids for quite some time now. Hell, even D-II baseball apparently had steroids based on something I heard on the radio. Even the media knows, but they just jump on the bandwagon and pretend like Barry's the only "cheater" in the game, simply because he's the one chasing the record. Really, I'm not sure anyone even cared about steroid usage in baseball until a few years ago.

    The aftermath of yesterday's record-breaker was touching but it turns out Hank Aaron's appearance was staged by Selig and Bayer (the Giants owner) just to save face. Did anyone see Barry blow up in the face of a few reporters that tried to talk about controversy in the press conference? "No, it's not tainted, not tainted at all," he said later. Barry Bonds made a big mistake some years ago and that is a tragedy, but I will always admire him for his talent. Up there with the legends of the game IMO.

  4. #94
    RTDAS pasag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Looking for milksteak
    Posts
    31,678
    I don't get the recover from injury quicker argument tbh. Yeah it's perfectly acceptable that if your hitting is enhanced from the stuff than it should be banned, but the whole recovering quicker thing doesn't really wash with me. Big deal tbh.
    Rest In Peace Craigos
    2003-2012


  5. #95
    Hall of Fame Member Sanz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    16,230
    Quote Originally Posted by adharcric View Post
    Steroids not only provide enhanced power and injury recovery but they can also help you hit better - just take a look at Barry's batting average soar in 2001 (.330, .370, .340, .360 - he's a career .300 hitter) at the age of 37.
    Would you mind posting his batting avg. for his career season-wise. I dont know where and how to get them.

    IMO he is still better than he was in Pittsburgh.

  6. #96
    Cricket Web Content Updater roseboy64's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Jamaica
    Posts
    18,568
    Quote Originally Posted by Lostman View Post
    bonds, bonds, bonds, steroids, steroids im sick of hearing this crap for the last 3 years.
    Can we please get back to the most important thing happening in baseball right now?.
    Which is the yankees are only 5 games behind the blosuxs, we are in for another classic redsox choke
    This has a chance of being as legendery as the 1978 choke, only way it could get any better is if a boston massacre version 3.0 was mixed into it.
    Yankees fan.
    Sir Alexander Chapman Ferguson = Greatest Ever Manager
    "One from ten leaves zero." - Eric Williams, former T&T PM
    Member of Cricket Web Green
    Member of Northside Power

    R.I.P Fardin Qayyumi

  7. #97
    The Wheel is Forever silentstriker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    39,948
    From the game of Shadows:


    Code:
    The transformation that Barry Bonds achieved through the use of 
    performance-enhancing drugs is reflected in his batting statistics. 
    Bonds began using steroids before the start of the 1999 season, when 
    he was 34 years old. His numbers, as compiled by baseball-reference.com, 
    show that his performance improved dramatically at a time when otherwise 
    he might have been approaching the end of his career.
    
    Of the five best offensive seasons in Bonds' career, four came after 
    he was 35 years old - and after 1999, the year he began using steroids.
    The historic 2001 season, when he was 36 years old (his age as of 
    Opening Day), was the best of all - .328 batting average, 73 home runs, 
    an on-base percentage of .515. But 2002, when he was 37 (.370, 46 HR) 
    and 2004, when he was 39, (.362, 45 HR) also were excellent seasons for
    Bonds, and 2003, when he was 38, was not far off the mark.
    
    In fact, of Bonds' five best seasons, only one came in what is usually 
    considered a baseball player's prime. That was 1993, before steroids, 
    when Bonds was 28 years old and playing his first season for the Giants.
    
    Year  Age   AB    R   H   2B  3B  HR  RBI   BB  SO    BA   OBP   SLG
    2001   36  476  129  156  32   2  73  137  177  93  .328  .515  .863
    2002   37  403  117  149  31   2  46  110  198  47  .370  .582  .799
    2004   39  373  129  135  27   3  45  101  232  41  .362  .609  .812
    1993   28  539  129  181  38   4  46  123  126  79  .336  .458  .677  
    2003   38  390  111  133  22   1  45   90  148  58  .341  .529  .749          
    
    Bonds' home run production also increased after he began using steroids. 
    In his 19-year career (through 2004), Bonds hit 45 or more home runs in 
    six seasons. Five of those seasons were after 1999 - after age 35, and 
    after he had begun using performance-enhancing drugs. 
    
    Year       Age        HR
    2001        36        73
    2000        35        49
    2002        37        46
    1993        28        46
    2004        39        45
    2003        38        45
    
    Another measure of Bonds' power surge is home run frequency - the number 
    of at-bats it took him, on average, to hit each home run. Over the first 
    13 years of his career - that is, before steroids - he hit a home run 
    every 16.2 at-bats. His most productive year during that period was 1994,
    when he hit a home run every 10.6 at-bats. (Bonds played in 112 of the 
    Giants' 115 games in 1994, the season that ended in a lockout. He hit 37 
    home runs in 391 at-bats.)
    
    From 1999 through 2004 - after steroids - the frequency with which Bonds 
    struck homers nearly doubled, to one every 8.5 at-bats. His best year was 
    2001, when he hit a home run every 6.5 at-bats. 
    
    YR       AB/HR
    1986      25.8
    1987      22.0
    1988      22.4
    1989      30.5
    1990      15.7
    1991      20.4
    1992      13.9
    1993      11.7
    1994      10.6
    1995      15.3
    1996      12.3
    1997      13.3
    1998      14.9
    1999      10.4
    2000       9.8
    2001       6.5
    2002       8.8
    2003       8.7
    2004       8.3
    
    Before steroids, Bonds was an outstanding player and a likely Hall 
    of Famer, the numbers affirm. In more than 6,600 at-bats over 13 
    seasons, he batted .290 and hit 411 homers with 1,216 RBIs. He made 
    the All-Star team eight times and was selected the National League's 
    Most Valuable Player in 1990, 1992 and 1993. Had he retired after the
    1998 season, he would rank 40th on the all-time home run list, above 
    Duke Snider. His 1,357 walks would rank 28th.
    
    Using a mathematical average to roll those 13 seasons into a single year, 
    we see that Bonds, before steroids, hit for average and power and was an 
    excellent base runner. The composite Bonds year during that period looks 
    like this: 
    
    	 G   AB     R   H  2B  3B  HR  RBI   SB  CS   BB  SO   BA   OBP
    86-98  146  509   105 147  31   5  32   93   34  10  104  81 .290  .411
    
    But after age 35 - after steroids - Bonds improved his game in most 
    categories. From 1999 to 2004, he had far better power and drove in and 
    scored more runs. His batting average increased by an astonishing 38 
    points, and his on-base percentage soared because of a big increase in 
    his walk total, which already was high. 
    
    At what should have been the end of his baseball career, Bonds became a 
    significantly better hitter than earlier in his career, as a composite 
    of those years shows.
    
             G   AB    R    H  2B  3B  HR  RBI   SB  CS   BB  SO   BA   OBP
    99-04  136  413  118  136  27   2  49  105   10   2  158  63 .328  .517
    
    The post-steroids Bonds also became one of the greatest hitters of all time. 
    Lee Sinins, creator of the Sabermetric Baseball Encyclopedia, used 
    statistician Bill James' "runs created" formula, a measure of total 
    batting production, to determine the best offensive performances in 
    baseball history. As Sinins ran the numbers, Bonds' 73-homer year in 
    2001 was the second-best offensive season any player has ever had - 
    second only to Babe Ruth's 1921 season, when the New York Yankees star hit 
    .378 with 171 RBI. 
    
          Year  Age   AB    R    H  2B  3B  HR  RBI   BB  SO    BA   OBP   RC
    RUTH  1921   26  540  177  204  44  16  59  171  145  81  .378  .512  243
    BONDS 2001   36  476  129  156  32   2  73  137  177  93  .328  .515  228
    
    Three of Bonds' post-steroids seasons were among the top 10 in baseball
    history, according to Sinins' list. Only Ruth had more, with five top-10 
    seasons.
    
    #      Name     Year      Age       Tm       BA       HR      RBI       RC
    1      RUTH     1921       26      NYY     .378       59      171      243
    2     BONDS     2001       36      SFG     .328       73      137      228
    3      RUTH     1923       28      NYY     .393       41      131      227
    4      RUTH     1920       25      NYY     .376       54      137      216
    5    GEHRIG     1927       24      NYY     .373       47      175      215
    6      RUTH     1927       32      NYY     .356       60      164      211
    6      FOXX     1932       24      PHA     .364       58      169      211
    8      RUTH     1924       29      NYY     .378       46      121      209
    9     BONDS     2002       37      SFG     .370       46      110      206
    10    BONDS     2004       39      SFG     .362       45      101      204
    10    GEHRIG    1936       33      NYY     .354       49      152      204
    10   HORNSBY    1922       26      STL     .401       42      152      204
    
    Sinins' study also underscores the fact that in baseball terms, 
    Bonds was an old man when he emerged as one of the greats of the game.
    
    Bonds was 36 when he had his 73-home run season, the first of three seasons 
    that rank in the top 10; he was 39 in 2004, which Sinins puts as 10th best 
    of all time, tied with Lou Gehrig's 1936 season for the Yankees and Rogers 
    Hornsby's efforts for the 1922 Cardinals.
    
    No player was older than 33 when he performed at this high level. (Gehrig was 
    33 in 1936.) Ruth was 26 in 1921, which Sinins rates as the best season of all 
    time. The average age of the other players on the top-10 seasons list - along 
    with Ruth, Gehrig and Hornsby, there is Jimmie Foxx, the old-time Philadelphia 
    Athletic - was 27.
    
    Yet another measure of Bonds' late-in-life power surge: By the end of 2005, 
    he had hit more home runs after age 35 than any of the game's great sluggers:
    
    HR          35&UP  Total HR         %
    BONDS         263       708        37
    AARON         245       755        32
    PALMEIRO      208       569        37
    RUTH          198       714        28
    JACKSON       153       563        27
    MCCOVEY       137       521        26
    MCGWIRE       126       583        22
    MURRAY        125       504        25
    SCHMIDT       123       548        22
    MAYS          118       660        18
    ROBINSON      111       586        19
    BANKS         108       512        21
    WILLIAMS      103       521        20
    KILLEBREW      86       573        15
    SOSA           49       588         8
    OTT            48       511         9
    MANTLE         40       536         7
    MATTHEWS       19       512         4
    FOXX            7       534         1
    
    Sean Forman, proprietor of baseball-reference.com, used a different statistic 
    to track Bonds' power surge after 1999. In a study done in 2004 for The 
    Chronicle, he applied a measure of offensive performance called OPS, for 
    on-base percentage plus slugging percentage, to compare Bonds to other great 
    hitters.
    
    Forman's conclusion: Starting in 2000, after Bonds had recovered from a 1999 
    elbow injury, he put together the greatest five consecutive seasons of any 
    hitter in baseball history. During that stretch, when he was age 35 to 39, 
    Bonds batted .339, hit 258 homers and drove in 544 runs, with an OPS of 1.316. 
    His performance was slightly better than what the study showed was the
     second-best five-year run of all time: Babe Ruth's first five years with the 
    Yankees. From age 25 to 29, Ruth hit .370 with 235 homeruns, 659 runs batted in, 
    and an OPS of 1.288. No other players in baseball history came close, the study 
    found.

    Quote Originally Posted by KungFu_Kallis View Post
    Peter Siddle top scores in both innings....... Matthew Wade gets out twice in one ball
    "The future light cone of the next Indian fast bowler is exactly the same as the past light cone of the previous one"
    -My beliefs summarized in words much more eloquent than I could come up with

    How the Universe came from nothing

  8. #98
    State Captain Lostman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    1,946
    Bonds has never tested positive for a steroid, since the MLB started testing(02 or 03? cant really remember) And from 98-02 everybody in the MLB was on the same garbage that he was on, including pitchers (who for an unknown reason most people dismiss as having abused steroids). So in essence he was on equal footing to all his contempories, and he was still by far the best slugger of that era.

    Anyway here is nice comparion, bonds from the 80's to today.
    ]

    and here is roger clemens from roughly the same time period


    both of them have never tested positive for steroids, but both of them have been strongly linked to steroids. Yet one is a cheat and the other is the greatest pitcher of all time?
    Im not saying that Bonds is better than both Ruth and Aaron. I think that Aaron was the best HR hitter followed by Ruth, but to simply knock Bonds down for being the best player in the steroid era is faulty when everybody was on steroids.

  9. #99
    Hall of Fame Member Sanz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    16,230
    That picture of Bonds doesn't prove anything. Take a look at Tendulkar's picture in 1987 and Tendulkar's picture in 2007. You will see a good bit of difference.

  10. #100
    International Coach biased indian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    office
    Posts
    11,303
    i never like when they walk the best batter comes
    the catcher just stand way off and the pitcher throws to him

    they should stop that and penalies the aciton
    the people come to watch the best in action
    Do not argue with an idiot. He will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience.
    RIP Craigos

  11. #101
    International Vice-Captain
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Sutton Coldfield
    Posts
    4,412
    Ain't all about home runs remember.

    Tommy Glavine, win number 300, quite possibly the last ever to do so.

Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst ... 567


Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Domestic cricket revamp.
    By brockley in forum Cricket Chat
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 30-11-2007, 08:15 AM
  2. Which was the best decade of the twentieth century?
    By cover drive man in forum Cricket Chat
    Replies: 81
    Last Post: 08-07-2007, 03:48 AM
  3. Cricket and Baseball
    By Stefano in forum Cricket Chat
    Replies: 52
    Last Post: 26-03-2007, 07:05 AM
  4. Replies: 1876
    Last Post: 23-09-2005, 04:21 PM
  5. The Twenty20 Cup in England
    By PY in forum Cricket Chat
    Replies: 126
    Last Post: 22-07-2003, 03:26 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •