Page 131 of 136 FirstFirst ... 3181121129130131132133 ... LastLast
Results 1,951 to 1,965 of 2032
Like Tree2Likes

Thread: Cricket Books

  1. #1951
    International Coach social's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    12,353
    Quote Originally Posted by Monk View Post
    It's an enjoyable book. Armstrong is one of those basic authors who does things simply but well. I enjoy his stuff.
    One of the enjoyable things about it is that he actually expresses opinions rather than simply regurgitates stats/hero worships

    Whilst I don't always agree with him (e.g. Kallis is largely dismissed as a minnow-basher), you can actually imagine having a reasonable debate with him about things

  2. #1952
    Cricket Spectator
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    23
    Hi all, long time lurker here. I bought a bunch of cricket books online today, and have no idea with which of them to start my delving into cricketing history and biographies. Most of them are heavily skewed towards South Africa, they were all bought from a fellow South African, and I don't know how many of the people on this forum will have read them yet, but your opinions will help me a lot!

    The books are:

    Herchelle Gibbs: To the Point
    Peter Kirsten: in the nick of time
    Deon Gouws: And nothing but the truth (focussing on the Hansie saga)
    Trevor Chesterfield: South Africa's cricket captains
    Gerald Brodribb: Next man in

    Any opinions, reviews, will be much appreciated. I've read a few reviews of the Herche and Brodribb ones, but haven't had much luck in finding out what people thought of the rest...

  3. #1953
    Cricket Web Staff Member fredfertang's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Cloud Cuckoo Land
    Posts
    11,812
    Quote Originally Posted by Snippie27 View Post
    Hi all, long time lurker here. I bought a bunch of cricket books online today, and have no idea with which of them to start my delving into cricketing history and biographies. Most of them are heavily skewed towards South Africa, they were all bought from a fellow South African, and I don't know how many of the people on this forum will have read them yet, but your opinions will help me a lot!

    The books are:

    Herchelle Gibbs: To the Point
    Peter Kirsten: in the nick of time
    Deon Gouws: And nothing but the truth (focussing on the Hansie saga)
    Trevor Chesterfield: South Africa's cricket captains
    Gerald Brodribb: Next man in

    Any opinions, reviews, will be much appreciated. I've read a few reviews of the Herche and Brodribb ones, but haven't had much luck in finding out what people thought of the rest...
    Pretty sure Archie reviewed the Gibbs book, and I think he quite enjoyed it (which surprised me)

    The Brodribb one is a terrific book, but in desperate need of a new edition - the only other one of those I've read is the Chesterfield one, which is excellent

    The Kirsten one is tricky to find, so well done on picking it up

  4. #1954
    Cricket Spectator
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    23
    Thanks fredfertang! I read Archie's review of Gibbs' book, and it seems the general consensus is that it's no literary marvel, but that his honesty and humour still makes it enjoyable - I do think however that I'll leave that one and the Gouws one for a while. Think I'll start with the Kirsten one, and then decide my next read after that. I was too young to have seen Kirsten play, but am very interested to hear his opinion on the game and the tumultuous time cricket SA had during the apartheid years...


  5. #1955
    U19 12th Man Lokomotiv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    246

    Icon5 Beyond a Boundary, CLR James

    Could anyone buy a copy of Beyond a Boundary by CLR James for me? I am a poor student. Recent devaluation of yen adds me more misery.

  6. #1956
    Cricket Spectator
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    23
    And I'm a very poor community service physio, anybody feel like donating a few hundred pounds? The rand-dollar has plummeted this week!

  7. #1957
    Cricket Web Staff Member archie mac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    canberra Australia
    Posts
    10,724
    Quote Originally Posted by jan View Post
    Guys,
    finishing the above mentioned piece on Boycott Im looking for a book about some more likeable character and with as little Yorkshire as possible...C. Walsh perhaps. Tips?

    Cheers again.
    Don't read the Walsh book, Heart of a lion is one of the worst cricket bios I have read

    Quote Originally Posted by social View Post
    Currently reading updated version of Geoff Armstrong's book on 100 Greatest Cricketers and whilst there is some utter nonsense (e.g. chapter on Kallis is a disgrace), some is very interesting (e.g. chapter on Grace)
    An easy read but I don't agree with too many of his opinions
    You know it makes sense.

  8. #1958
    Cricket Spectator
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    23
    I finished the Peter Kirsten (In the nick of time) book in basically one session today.

    As a first foray into Cricketing bio's and Cricket books in general it was a very interesting read.

    It spent a lot of time on his formative years at Selborne, SACS and later finding his feet for WP.

    Enjoyed his take on the County scene, the five years he spent at Derbyshire and how he went from wide-eyed wonder, to feeling rudderless and unsure of his place in a cricketing landscape that still didn't offer him everything he wanted and felt he (rightly) deserved - National status - this was towards the end of SA's isolation.

    I really enjoyed reading about the moment that made him a bit of a pariah in SA cricket for a while - running out Paddy Clift on a virtually dead ball, and then the interesting karma of being run out in similar circumstances by Kapil Dev a number of years later.

    His move to Border right before his selection for the National squad, was well described and his reasoning makes a lot more sense on looking at it through the more intimate knowledge of everything that came before.

    His description of the moment that our 92 dreams came to a crashing, rain-soaked halt is very real, and re-awakened the disbelief I remember feeling as a young 6-year old, that couldn't understand the intecracies of what exactly had happened on that fateful day... His experience shone through in the words he spoke that day to the team led by Kepler Wessels: "come on, guys. We've had a great tournament and done really well. Let's go out and say thanks to the crowd."

    I do have some criticisms and complaints - some of the chapters' weren't that well structured, jumping back and forth through different events without clear focus, causing the reader to have to reread certain parts to be certain which game/match is being described.

    I also felt more time could have been spent on the political ramifications of the rebel tours (in which he captained the SA team a number of times).

    That being said it was an insightful read on a cricketer I had heard about from time to time, but mostly only in relation to the younger, more famous, Kirsten. From all accounts an interesting man that unfortunately, along with Pollock, Richardson, etc received a bad deal due to the political environment of their time...

  9. #1959
    Eternal Optimist / Cricket Web Staff Member GIMH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Jason Koumas is having a party
    Posts
    48,075
    Quote Originally Posted by Lokomotiv View Post
    Could anyone buy a copy of Beyond a Boundary by CLR James for me? I am a poor student. Recent devaluation of yen adds me more misery.
    I'll transfer you the money mate, just send me your bank details
    "It was an easy decision to sign. I could have gone elsewhere, I had calls, but it never entered my mind it's not about the money."
    Jason Koumas

    SWA

    RIP Craigos. A true CW legend. You will be missed.

  10. #1960
    Cricket Web Staff Member archie mac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    canberra Australia
    Posts
    10,724
    Quote Originally Posted by Snippie27 View Post
    I finished the Peter Kirsten (In the nick of time) book in basically one session today.

    As a first foray into Cricketing bio's and Cricket books in general it was a very interesting read.

    It spent a lot of time on his formative years at Selborne, SACS and later finding his feet for WP.

    Enjoyed his take on the County scene, the five years he spent at Derbyshire and how he went from wide-eyed wonder, to feeling rudderless and unsure of his place in a cricketing landscape that still didn't offer him everything he wanted and felt he (rightly) deserved - National status - this was towards the end of SA's isolation.

    I really enjoyed reading about the moment that made him a bit of a pariah in SA cricket for a while - running out Paddy Clift on a virtually dead ball, and then the interesting karma of being run out in similar circumstances by Kapil Dev a number of years later.

    His move to Border right before his selection for the National squad, was well described and his reasoning makes a lot more sense on looking at it through the more intimate knowledge of everything that came before.

    His description of the moment that our 92 dreams came to a crashing, rain-soaked halt is very real, and re-awakened the disbelief I remember feeling as a young 6-year old, that couldn't understand the intecracies of what exactly had happened on that fateful day... His experience shone through in the words he spoke that day to the team led by Kepler Wessels: "come on, guys. We've had a great tournament and done really well. Let's go out and say thanks to the crowd."

    I do have some criticisms and complaints - some of the chapters' weren't that well structured, jumping back and forth through different events without clear focus, causing the reader to have to reread certain parts to be certain which game/match is being described.

    I also felt more time could have been spent on the political ramifications of the rebel tours (in which he captained the SA team a number of times).

    That being said it was an insightful read on a cricketer I had heard about from time to time, but mostly only in relation to the younger, more famous, Kirsten. From all accounts an interesting man that unfortunately, along with Pollock, Richardson, etc received a bad deal due to the political environment of their time...
    Good stuff, would you consider writing a full review for CW?

  11. #1961
    Cricket Spectator
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    23
    Quote Originally Posted by archie mac View Post
    Good stuff, would you consider writing a full review for CW?

    Hey archie, well I've never written a formal review in my life. But if you guys are prepared to edit the **** out of it, especially seeing English is my second language, I'll try my hand at it

  12. #1962
    Cricket Web Staff Member archie mac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    canberra Australia
    Posts
    10,724
    Quote Originally Posted by Snippie27 View Post
    Hey archie, well I've never written a formal review in my life. But if you guys are prepared to edit the **** out of it, especially seeing English is my second language, I'll try my hand at it
    That would be great. Post here when you're ready and we will work out how to send it through.

  13. #1963
    Cricket Web: All-Time Legend smalishah84's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Pakistan
    Posts
    21,396
    Quote Originally Posted by Snippie27 View Post
    I finished the Peter Kirsten (In the nick of time) book in basically one session today.

    As a first foray into Cricketing bio's and Cricket books in general it was a very interesting read.

    It spent a lot of time on his formative years at Selborne, SACS and later finding his feet for WP.

    Enjoyed his take on the County scene, the five years he spent at Derbyshire and how he went from wide-eyed wonder, to feeling rudderless and unsure of his place in a cricketing landscape that still didn't offer him everything he wanted and felt he (rightly) deserved - National status - this was towards the end of SA's isolation.

    I really enjoyed reading about the moment that made him a bit of a pariah in SA cricket for a while - running out Paddy Clift on a virtually dead ball, and then the interesting karma of being run out in similar circumstances by Kapil Dev a number of years later.

    His move to Border right before his selection for the National squad, was well described and his reasoning makes a lot more sense on looking at it through the more intimate knowledge of everything that came before.

    His description of the moment that our 92 dreams came to a crashing, rain-soaked halt is very real, and re-awakened the disbelief I remember feeling as a young 6-year old, that couldn't understand the intecracies of what exactly had happened on that fateful day... His experience shone through in the words he spoke that day to the team led by Kepler Wessels: "come on, guys. We've had a great tournament and done really well. Let's go out and say thanks to the crowd."

    I do have some criticisms and complaints - some of the chapters' weren't that well structured, jumping back and forth through different events without clear focus, causing the reader to have to reread certain parts to be certain which game/match is being described.

    I also felt more time could have been spent on the political ramifications of the rebel tours (in which he captained the SA team a number of times).

    That being said it was an insightful read on a cricketer I had heard about from time to time, but mostly only in relation to the younger, more famous, Kirsten. From all accounts an interesting man that unfortunately, along with Pollock, Richardson, etc received a bad deal due to the political environment of their time...
    Nice review dude. You are pretty good at your second language it seems.
    And smalishah's avatar is the most classy one by far Jan certainly echoes the sentiments of CW

    Yeah we don't crap in the first world; most of us would actually have no idea what that was emanating from Ajmal's backside. Why isn't it roses and rainbows like what happens here? PEWS's retort to Ganeshran on Daemon's picture depicting Ajmal's excreta

  14. #1964
    Cricket Spectator
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    23
    Quote Originally Posted by smalishah84 View Post
    Nice review dude. You are pretty good at your second language it seems.
    Thank you, really appreciate it! I'll try to write the full review this week. Just making some notes and marking important bits right now.

    I have another question on some books, but this time before I buy. I still have some cash available, but not that much, and am looking this time around to buy books that are both worth the read, and could be seen as an investment as well.

    So far I have found the following that's piqued my interest, the Smith and Greig one I can buy together if I don't buy the others. The other two will probably have to be single buys.

    Graeme Smith, Captain's diary. 2007-2009. Signed by Smith. 1st edition, but softcover.

    Tony Greig, My Story, 1st edition, HC. Signed by Greig.

    Both of these are selling for under $10 each.

    Then there is Bouncers and Boundaries. Graeme and Peter Pollock. Signed by both Pollocks. HC. 1st edition.

    Finally, I'm considering - The jubilee book of Cricket. 4th edition. 1897. Not signed


    These last two are being sold for around $20 each.

    What would you guys suggest as the best prospect. First priority for me is that it should be an interesting read, but investment potential is also a consideration.

  15. #1965
    Cricket Web Staff Member fredfertang's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Cloud Cuckoo Land
    Posts
    11,812
    Ranji's book is dire, and copies turn up on ebay in the UK and don't sell with a 99p start price - avoid at all costs is my advice

    Greig's book is ok, but if you can get a signed copy for that go for it as that's a good price - if your priority is to read about the great man you'd be better off with David Tossell's bio

    The Pollock book is similar - not a great read and published before they whitewashed Australia - but I'd buy it signed by both at that price for sure.

    Graeme Smith's is probably a decent buy at $10, but only 'cos he's signed it

    You should also bear in find that for collectors condition is everything so modern books really need to be in good nick with undamaged dust jackets - the Pollock one's jacket wasn't laminated so you can get away with that a bit more, but even signed it wouldn't be worth much with a scruffy jacket, and next to nothing without one at all



Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Next Indian Coach
    By shoot_me in forum Cricket Chat
    Replies: 41
    Last Post: 23-05-2007, 02:37 AM
  2. Cricket and Baseball
    By Stefano in forum Cricket Chat
    Replies: 52
    Last Post: 26-03-2007, 07:05 AM
  3. Cricket v/s Baseball
    By chekmeout in forum Cricket Chat
    Replies: 105
    Last Post: 26-07-2005, 04:56 PM
  4. Windies cricket situation
    By Pratters in forum Cricket Chat
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 14-05-2005, 10:43 PM
  5. The Twenty20 Cup in England
    By PY in forum Cricket Chat
    Replies: 126
    Last Post: 22-07-2003, 03:26 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •