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Thread: Favourite cricketing literature

  1. #1
    International Vice-Captain open365's Avatar
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    Favourite cricketing literature

    This article is my favourite piece of cricket related writing,closely followed by rain men,a book on ageing village cricketers.

    whats yours?

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    International Coach archie mac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by open365
    This article is my favourite piece of cricket related writing,closely followed by rain men,a book on ageing village cricketers.

    whats yours?
    Not bad.

    Arthur Mailey's description of the first time he bowled to Trumper would be mine.
    You know it makes sense.

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    Some of my favourite pieces from those available online -

    RC Robertson-Glasgow : Bradman retires
    Don Bradman will bat no more against England, and two contrary feelings dispute within us: relief, that our bowlers will no longer be oppressed by this phenomenon; regret, that a miracle has been removed from among us. So must ancient Italy have felt when she heard of the death of Hannibal.


    Alan Ross : Schoolboy's hero


    Heroes in fact die with one's youth. They are pinned like
    butterflies to the setting board of early memories - the time when skies
    were always blue, the sun shone and the air was filled with the sounds
    and scents of grass being cut. I find myself still as desperate to read
    the Sussex score in the stop-press as ever I was; but I no longer
    worship heroes, beings for whom the ordinary scales of human values are
    inadequate. One learns that as one grows up, so do the gods grow down.
    It is in many ways a pity: for one had thought that heroes had no
    problems of their own. Now one knows different !
    AA Thomson : We want Jessop
    That innings of Jessop's . . . It was not an innings. It was a
    glamour; it was witchery; it was thunder and lightning. The Croucher bent
    almost double. The steel spring snapped viciously. The ball sped, as
    though hurled to everlasting punishment. It was not Ajax defying the
    lightning. It was Ajax catching the lightning and insolently flinging it
    back in the face of heaven. Fieldsmen who, a moment before, had been
    practically leaning against the bat's face, went scurrying back to the
    boundary-edge. They were at the mercy of elemental force. For thirty-three
    minutes the might of Yorkshire was impotent. Rhodes was a schoolboy. Hirst
    a village-green trundler.
    Old men will show you the marks on the face of the pavilion
    clock which Jessop's second sixer shattered. They will point out the exact
    spot in Copperbeech Avenue where the hansom cab was standing at the moment
    when Jessop's third stupendous sixer fell through its roof. That crowded
    half-hour was hardly cricket; it was divine madness. The telegraph-board
    moved like a cinema-film....

    David Foot : One magic hour


    Gimblett went out with Arthurís spare bat. At lunch Somerset had been
    105 for 5, then very soon afterwards 107 for 6. Morris Nichols was
    pinging them down, faster than anything this Boy from Bicknoller had
    ever seen before. Reg Ingle was wishing heíd never won the toss. The
    customers were retreating in increasing numbers to the beer tent.

    The 20-year-old newcomer hit 101 out of 130 in just over the hour to
    win the Lawrence Trophy for the fastest century of the season. At the
    time he also didnít know about such an award, though significantly he
    was later to name his only son Lawrence. He was out for 123 in 79
    minutes; he hit three sixes and 17 fours.

    The Smith googlies made no impression on him. Nor did Nichols when he
    came back with the new ball. Harold had probably never played
    previously in a match punctuated by the ritual of the new ball. He
    soon lost the big, bronzed Wellard, and then dared to score even
    quicker than the mightly slogger, even if the sixes were less
    spectacular in altitude.
    Michael Parkinson : War of the roses
    I once asked him about Tattersall, and he said: "Tha'
    could reckon he'd bowl one bad ball a year. I were t'spotter for t'leg
    trap. I fielded at backward short-leg so I could see where Tatt was
    going to pitch it. If it were short I'd shout 'duck lads!' and they'd
    know to get out of the way.

    "One Pancake Tuesday Tatt bowled a long hop. I spotted it but I
    thought I'd have a bit of fun so I didn't call it. Well t'batsman got
    hold of it and gave t'ball a terrible thump. Tha' should have seen
    Jack Ikin's face. He didn't speak to me for three months."

    "Did it hit him?" I asked. "No, he caught it," Malcolm said.

  4. #4
    International Coach archie mac's Avatar
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    A great list that Tapi. You have mentioned just about all of my favourite writers, I thought you would have included a Cardus piece.


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    Couldn't find any *really* good ones by Cardus online. My favourite is a piece about George Gunn which is part of a larger article about Trent bridge. Don't know which book it is from. There is something by Cardus about Gunn online but it is nothing like the other article.

    Btw, I forgot about Mailey, or would have included it in my list.

  6. #6
    International Coach archie mac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tapioca
    Couldn't find any *really* good ones by Cardus online. My favourite is a piece about George Gunn which is part of a larger article about Trent bridge. Don't know which book it is from. There is something by Cardus about Gunn online but it is nothing like the other article.

    Btw, I forgot about Mailey, or would have included it in my list.

    Did you find the Mailey one on-line?

    Have you ever read Parkinson describing a young Jack Fingleton batting with Charlie Macartney?

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    Mailey is here - http://www.cricinfo.com/db/ARCHIVE/A...VS_MAILEY_1958

    Don't think I have read the Parkinson article..

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    International Coach archie mac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tapioca
    Mailey is here - http://www.cricinfo.com/db/ARCHIVE/A...VS_MAILEY_1958

    Don't think I have read the Parkinson article..

    Thanks for that. I only have the Parkinson article in an anthology.

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    Tufnell's autobiography was very, very amusing in parts. For pure knowledge of the game, Richie Benaud's book was pretty good I thought. (Can you tell I'm not a big reader?)
    Manchester United FC: 20 Times

    R.I.P. Sledger's Signature, 2004-2008

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    Hall of Fame Member steds's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Halsey
    Can you tell I'm not a big reader?
    Well, yes. 5'4" makes you a very little reader indeed.

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    Cricket Web: All-Time Legend honestbharani's Avatar
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    Among the present day writers from India, I like Rohit Brijnath. He has a good style and makes good points.
    We miss you, Fardin. :(. RIP.
    Quote Originally Posted by vic_orthdox View Post
    In the end, I think it's so utterly, incomprehensibly boring. There is so much context behind each innings of cricket that dissecting statistics into these small samples is just worthless. No-one has ever been faced with the same situation in which they come out to bat as someone else. Ever.
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    International Coach archie mac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by honestbharani
    Among the present day writers from India, I like Rohit Brijnath. He has a good style and makes good points.
    We don't see a lot of the Indian writers here in Aust. but I did enjoy 'Corners of a Foreign Field' by R. Guha. Although I thought he was a bit harsh on Lord Harris

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    Quote Originally Posted by steds
    Well, yes. 5'4" makes you a very little reader indeed.
    That wasn't bad for a scouser, actually.

    And I'm growing. 5'5" and counting.

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    Spanish_Vicente sledger's Avatar
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    anyone read ed smith's book ? or the one by simon hughes ? think it was called a hard lot of yakka or something..

  15. #15
    International Coach archie mac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sledger
    anyone read ed smith's book ? or the one by simon hughes ? think it was called a hard lot of yakka or something..
    I read the Simon Hughes book, very funny

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