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Thread: What is a "Good pitch"

  1. #1
    State Vice-Captain MoxPearl's Avatar
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    What is a "Good pitch"

    I dont understand why alot of commentators/people here seem to think

    "A fast pitch is a good pitch" .. sure.. it is to the batters .. but cricket is a 2 way game.

    I dont understand since a pitch is not lightspeed fast that its a bad pitch...

    As long as a pitch has evenish bounce then i dont see how a slow pitch is a bad pitch.. it should just be called a "Slowsh Pitch" .. and a fast one can be called a "Fast Pitch" .. not a "Bad pitch" and a "Good pitch"

    My 2cents

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    Quote Originally Posted by MoxPearl
    I dont understand why alot of commentators/people here seem to think

    "A fast pitch is a good pitch" .. sure.. it is to the batters .. but cricket is a 2 way game.

    I dont understand since a pitch is not lightspeed fast that its a bad pitch...

    As long as a pitch has evenish bounce then i dont see how a slow pitch is a bad pitch.. it should just be called a "Slowsh Pitch" .. and a fast one can be called a "Fast Pitch" .. not a "Bad pitch" and a "Good pitch"

    My 2cents
    People like to see plenty of runs scored I guess. I like to see over 500 in an ODI ideally.

  3. #3
    Hall of Fame Member chaminda_00's Avatar
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    A good pitch is one that has even bounce, it doesn't matter if the bounce is high or low. It turns square from ball one. Fast pitches are also better then slow pitches as it is easier to bat on then slow pitches, generally and they give assistant to fast bowlers. I don't reckon a curator would ever be able to produce this type of pitch, but i think it suits all types of players from all over the world.
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    A good pitch is one where the skill of both batsmen and bowlers comes through.


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    Hall of Fame Member GotSpin's Avatar
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    Where everything is balanced, not to slow, not to fast, doesn't swing or spin too much and doesn't die on day 4-5 and offers assistance to both batsmen and bowlers
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  6. #6
    Virat Kohli (c) Jono's Avatar
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    Whenever a commentator says 'its a good pitch', I just interpret it as they are judging it from the batsman's viewpoint, as they always use it in the context of whether so and so can put up a good enough score. I never believed they were saying it as if its better compared to a slowish pitch. Maybe they are, but I've never seen it like that.

    On a personal basis, I like about 480-500 runs scored in a ODI. I always love chases from 240-260. I believe them to be more exciting than chases of 300 (although once in a while they are great, but not too often).

    I really really enjoyed game one of the NZ vs. Aus match, and that was much below a 300 run chase. I also enjoyed the first 2 finasl between Aus and Pakistan.
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    State Vice-Captain mavric41's Avatar
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    If you are talking about a test pitch I think an ideal pitch goes along these line:some assistance for the fast bowlers in the first couple of sessions, starts to flatten out and come on to the bat over the next couple of days and starts to break up in the last half of the game to provide assistance for spinners and some cut off the pitch. Provides a challenge for both batsmen and bowlers and if good enough, both will succeed.
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  8. #8
    U19 12th Man
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    A pitch that is consistant.

    Consistant bounce, spin, pace, seam across all parts of the pitch.

  9. #9
    Hall of Fame Member social's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mavric41
    If you are talking about a test pitch I think an ideal pitch goes along these line:some assistance for the fast bowlers in the first couple of sessions, starts to flatten out and come on to the bat over the next couple of days and starts to break up in the last half of the game to provide assistance for spinners and some cut off the pitch. Provides a challenge for both batsmen and bowlers and if good enough, both will succeed.
    Correct.

  10. #10
    Cricket Web Staff Member Richard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mavric41
    If you are talking about a test pitch I think an ideal pitch goes along these line:some assistance for the fast bowlers in the first couple of sessions, starts to flatten out and come on to the bat over the next couple of days and starts to break up in the last half of the game to provide assistance for spinners and some cut off the pitch. Provides a challenge for both batsmen and bowlers and if good enough, both will succeed.
    In other words - win toss, win match.
    No, there's no such thing as a "good pitch", it's fantasy.
    The fact is, the best thing is for different parts of The World to produce different typical pitches. In the subcontinent, you expect pitches of roughly even bounce (becoming uneven really late in the match) that turn, plenty, and don't move off the seam. In England and New Zealand you expect pitches that offer seam-movement and no real turn, with mostly even bounce.
    In Australia and southern Africa you expect pitches that offer only a little bit of seam and no turn.
    In West Indies expectations have changed lots.
    Everywhere you go you expect the odd ground where there's an exception to the general country rule, and every now and then you expect pitches where you get farcical matches on uneven, seaming, turning pitches; or another farce where you get no seam, turn and totally even bounce and one team scores 650 and the other rolls over for 400 in 2 innings.
    No pitch should ever help seam and spin in one match, it's unfair on the team losing the toss. In fact, the best pitches are those that change as little as possible.
    And as for pace - well, obviously slow pitches help restrict the scoring and make it harder to get batsmen out - fast pitches do the reverse. But good bowlers will always create chances regardless of the pace of the pitch. You want some fast pitches, some slow ones.
    Evenness in bounce is always ideal, but obviously it's not always possible.
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  11. #11
    School Boy/Girl Captain Black Thunder's Avatar
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    good pitches are different for differen people.

    For administrators, they're just roads that will ensure the match plays out the full 5 days, or in the case of a one-day game tehre is plenty of runs.

    For batsmen, they want it to be fast, but with a nice even bounce so the ball will come of the bat quickly.

    Spinners want no grass and as dry as possible.

    Quickies want some grass with a little bit of uneveness, and perhaps even a soft top with a hard underbelly - meaning the ball will break through the top and rise up severely off the hard under surface.

    I think you've just got to make a pitch which gives a bit in it for everyone.

    There are a few things that i think need to occur for it to be a good pitch:
    - the pitch has to be even. must have even bounce.
    - must have some form of hardness. Want the ball to come through with some pace - this is good for both bowlers and batsmen.
    - won't break up over the course of one day.

    Everything else is basically a bit of the beauty of a wicket - they all have their particular characteristics.

    My ideal pitch (probably not possible to do, but anyway):
    - Very hard pitch.
    - totally even.
    - as few cracks as possible. Absolutely no big ones.
    - no grass at all from 2 metres and fuller (these are genuine half volleys which shouldn't get any assistance of the pitch and should go for four)
    - a small even layer of grass from about 8 inches outside off stump to 8 inches outside leg stumps (give some support for the quick bowler for bowling in the right region). A little bit thicker grass 3 inches outside the off and leg stumps as these are the best lines to be bowling (leg stump to right hander = off stump to left hander).
    - no grass at all outside of these lines or on a long hop length as these are trash balls which should go to the fence too.

    i do question the possiblity of being able to put grass where you want it so perfectly, but we can always put it on our wish list.

  12. #12
    Cricket Web Staff Member Richard's Avatar
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    Well, you can't "put" it there, exactly, but you can leave it there.
    Nah, there's never much problem with grass on Long-Hop\Half-Volley length - even if a ball moves from Long-Hop length, good batsmen have still got easily enough time to adjust. And if something lands Half-Volley length, it doesn't get a chance to move. The bat hits it before then.
    Personally - for Test-matches - I like best pitches that are relatively quick and offer a reasonable degree of seam-movement. The best bowlers will still bowl economically, and the grass means the seam will grip and the bounce means edges have a good chance of carrying. Inaccurate bowlers will get less deliveries to seam and be more expensive. I don't like super-quick pitches like sometimes get produced at The WACA because they turn useless bowlers like Lee into relatively dangerous ones - they make it possible to beat batsmen for pace and bounce, and I've never liked that. Still, as long as they're confined to The WACA - and they are - it's not too bad. Equally, I really don't like pitches where the team batting first just piles-up 650 and the next team collapses for 400 in 2 digs - there's nothing more boring. Nor do I like it where you get 500-plays-500 - equally boring. I certainly don't like win-toss-win-match pitches (ie: ones that offer seam at the start - team stuck in gets knocked-over for 250; team batting piles-up 500 as the pitch eases; then it starts to take spin and team gets rolled-over for 250 again).
    There's always got to be some spin-friendly pitches - it's essential to maintain the fabrics of the game - but I prefer it when they're mostly confined to the subcontinent.
    For ODIs I like a relatively slow pitch, making accurate 75-80mph bowling difficult to get away but quicker, more wayward bowling easier to seize on. Where bowling standard-good-length then bowling in the blockhole gives it's rewards, and where looking to take wickets will often be punished. I don't like it when it gets too slow and you bring average fingerspinners into the game and make it one of those dreadful reversed matches where the 15 overs are a hammer-tongs and then it gets harder and harder as the ball gets softer, and I don't like it when you get an easy-paced belter where it's really, really hard to bowl economically unless you're landing just about every ball on the same spot. The more consistent the better, too, as wicketkeepers can trust it - the more the wicketkeeper stands-up to the stumps to the seamers, the better.
    Above all, though, whatever the pitch, I like it to stay the same throughout the game. Obviously a pitch will very, very rarely change over the course of 100 overs, but in Test-matches you see pitches that change sometimes. Again, that gives an unfair advantage. What is great, though, is pitches like Headingley where it's a lottery - batting can get quite easy when the sun's out, but when the clouds come over the bounce gets uneven and it starts seaming. They're great, though, only as long as they don't occur too often.

  13. #13
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    Anything that offers help to bowlers and batsmen that are prepared to bend their backs is a good pitch, simple as that.
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  14. #14
    International Debutant cbuts's Avatar
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    odi's i dont really care what the pitch is like. just give me a good close game like last saturday. im sure even the australian fans got bored with tuesdays game after bout 55 overs
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  15. #15
    State Vice-Captain mavric41's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard
    In other words - win toss, win match.
    No, there's no such thing as a "good pitch", it's fantasy.

    No pitch should ever help seam and spin in one match, it's unfair on the team losing the toss. In fact, the best pitches are those that change as little as possible.
    .
    Evenness in bounce is always ideal, but obviously it's not always possible.
    So according to you, we should play on concrete pitches with bowling machines.

    The changes in pitches, as long as they are not too extreme, provide a test for players' skill, which, if they are good enough, they will succceed.

    If pitches don't ever help bowlers, why be a bowler? Why not just play 20/20 day and night?

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