Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: batting plans?

  1. #1
    School Boy/Girl Cricketer
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    wales
    Posts
    62

    batting plans?

    hi, i am a number 5 batsman, and an ex captain for my school cricket team

    throughout my time in cricket, iv never realy had a batting plan, and im wondering if im suffering from not having one.

  2. #2
    Global Moderator vic_orthdox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    25,110
    A few things to think about.

    What shots can I play that have very little risk and still score?
    Where can I pick up singles to rotate the strike? Especially early!
    What is my plan if I'm getting bogged down. This could be batting deep in my crease, having a go-to shot under pressure, etc.

  3. #3
    Hall of Fame Member Goughy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    All Over
    Posts
    15,083
    At 5 your batting plan will change each time you bat. Coming in at 3/3 your plan will differ from 150/3 with a guy at the other end who is smashing the ball. Know what type of innings you wish to play when you walk out to bat.

    In the first you may try and slowly build a foundation by rotating the strike and preserving wickets or you may try and counterattack. In the second you may try and give to other guy as much strike as possible or you may try and join in the fun. The biggest crime in this instance is to waste dot balls and keep the other guy off strike.

    Know the game situation at 5 and bat accordingly. Different situations need different types of innings. The keys for all batting though are (as Jack mentions) knowing where the gaps are and to be able to pick up singles and knowing your own go-to-shots that you can confidently play when the ball is in a certain area.
    Last edited by Goughy; 27-10-2009 at 08:11 PM.
    If I only just posted the above post, please wait 5 mins before replying as there is bound to be edits

    West Robham Rabid Wolves Caedere lemma quod eat lemma

    Happy Birthday! (easier than using Birthday threads)

    Email and MSN- Goughy at cricketmail dot net

  4. #4
    Cricket Spectator
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    42

    Yeah as above

    Plus you should decide what shots you want to play to what sorts of bowler. Eg where can you score/what shots can you play against an offspinner/leggie/inswinger/outswinger etc.


  5. #5
    School Boy/Girl Cricketer
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    wales
    Posts
    62
    so, basicaly, know what the situation of the innnings is, and thikn about the shots il play say if its bowled slightly shorter, or if its slightly fuller. cheers guys

  6. #6
    International 12th Man
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Hamilton, NZ
    Posts
    1,566
    My batting plan as an opening batsman is to minimise risk while maximising scoring options. To do this, I'm looking for the single, I'm looking to ensure that anything on my pads has bat on it and that shots that involve me playing away from my body or with a cross bat are taken out of the calculations

    Here is a batting plan I used for the last two dayer we played.

    Phase 1: Building phase
    Time: 0 20 overs

    Mantra: Get forward, watch the ball

    Focus Points:
    Strong defensive platform
    - Play with soft hands
    - Get forward
    - Play late
    - Leave well
    Scoring Shots
    - Punch into off side for singles
    - Drives in the V
    - Work off the legs
    Goals
    - Bat until drinks
    - 30 runs on the board


    That's one phase, the second phase was about sustaining the strong defensive platform, keeping the footwork moving, looking to open up other areas to score (developing the cut shot, looking to sweep/loft the spinners. The third phase was about attacking but sensible cricket shots - looking to use my feet against bowlers.

    The mantra is what you say to yourself when going through your pre-ball ritual. For me, I'll take centre guard, put my back foot toes on the centre line and survey the field, then get into the batting stance, check my backlift is straight and that my bottom hand is in the correct position and then watch the bowler take his run in.

    Depending on the pace of the bowler, I'll alternate between either watching the ball in his hand the entire time he runs in ( Anyone up to 130kmh) or draw a mental square around the area the ball will be delivered and focus on that, as he enters the delivery stride, I'll say "Watch the ball, get forward" to myself and start my trigger movement which is generally transferring the weight to the front foot, look to watch the ball onto the bat and make a quick assertive call as to whether there are runs or not.

    Then I reset, generally by walking towards square leg, have a look around and take my concerntration off cricket while the bowler goes back to his run in.

    I find this helps, especially when you're playing to a plan - it's more about the ritual that will develop consistent thoughts and actions to deliveries, rather than just having the plan in place. The plan is to ensure your ritual suits purpose.

  7. #7
    Cricket Web Staff Member Woodster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Manchester, England
    Posts
    5,481
    Seems a very decent plan, good to know your role within the side, and ensure your captain requires you to play this role.

    Don't think you should stick rigidly to this, as situations and conditions can invariably be different and will require an alternative approach. Flexibility and the ability to assess the situation will come with experience, but there will be times when a different approach is the best way to go.

    For example if you're chasing a decent score and are batting with a lesser experienced batsman that's having a tough time getting the board ticking, you may be required to take one or two more chances than is ideal, but a different approach is better for the side, therefore you may need to shelve your ideal plan.

    The rotation of the strike is crucial for an opening batsman. With attacking fields in place at the start of an innings there should be plenty of gaps, and this is seriously frustrating for the bowlers to guide the ball into gaps and get down the other end.
    http://batallday.blogspot.com/ - Cricket blog dedicated to domestic cricket.

  8. #8
    International 12th Man
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Hamilton, NZ
    Posts
    1,566
    Quote Originally Posted by Woodster View Post
    Seems a very decent plan, good to know your role within the side, and ensure your captain requires you to play this role.

    Don't think you should stick rigidly to this, as situations and conditions can invariably be different and will require an alternative approach. Flexibility and the ability to assess the situation will come with experience, but there will be times when a different approach is the best way to go.

    For example if you're chasing a decent score and are batting with a lesser experienced batsman that's having a tough time getting the board ticking, you may be required to take one or two more chances than is ideal, but a different approach is better for the side, therefore you may need to shelve your ideal plan.

    The rotation of the strike is crucial for an opening batsman. With attacking fields in place at the start of an innings there should be plenty of gaps, and this is seriously frustrating for the bowlers to guide the ball into gaps and get down the other end.
    All very true and all good points.

    In this case, the plan above was for a two day match where runs are not as important as conservation of wickets for the first twenty overs. At club level and even representative level, a lot of teams rarely manage to bat fifty overs, let alone 70-80 overs in a longer format.

    It's highly important regardless of match situation in club cricket to get through to the 15th or 20th over with as little wickets gone as possible because bowlers will get frustrated, tired and second string bowlers will have to bowl overs. That's where you or the middle order can capitalise.

    Singles come by nature of looking for them, being able to dab into gaps on the offside or wait for the ball to be on the pads where ticking it around the corner or playing through midwicket is virtually riskless means runs will come regardless of defensive technique.

    In one day cricket at club level, I can almost guarantee you that a side who is 50-1 after 20 will more likely post 250 in 50 than a side who is 95 for 4.

    But alternately, my plan in one day cricket generally has a shorter time period of getting in - I look to play the first 6-10 overs conservatively, look for singles, turn the strike over but shelve riskier shots - if we haven't lost wickets, I'll increase the momentum, generally by going to cricket shots I know I play well (in my case, cuts, cover drives and sweeping the spinners) while being a bit more forceful on drives.

    In this case I'm fortunate that I know my role in the team, so I can prepare properly during the week. From a captains point of view, it'd be great if you can get your team into same tracks of thought, so they know where they're playing on Tuesday (and can get their plans in order during training for the week).

    For middle order batsman, you might have two plans - one for being in before the 20th over and one for being in after the 20th. In any case, I'd say give yourself 10-15 balls before you even look to play beyond a basic range of shots, this is the secret to developing consistency and eventually you'll find yourself naturally able to off drive, ondrive and straight drive without risk which will add to your runrate.

  9. #9
    International 12th Man
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Hamilton, NZ
    Posts
    1,566
    And just to show how plans may change based on match situation....

    Here is my one day batting plan for this week - I may be selected to play premier cricket and assume that I'll be asked to do a job in the lower order and play more as a bowler than a batsman (I'm an all rounder who just happens to also open the batting)

    Gameplan: 27/11/2010
    Match Situation: OD
    Preparation for: Prems

    Batting Assuming Position #6-10

    Batting: Two Phases

    Phase 1: Assess the situation
    Time: 0-10 deliveries at crease

    Mantra: Get forward, watch the ball

    Focus Points:
    Strong defensive platform
    - Play with soft hands
    - Get forward
    - Play late
    - Leave well
    Scoring Shots
    - Punch into off side for singles
    - Drives in the V
    - Work off the legs
    Goals
    - See ten deliveries
    - Feed strike to other batsman
    - Look to have 5 runs off 10 balls

    Phase 2: Sensible attacking cricket
    Time: 10+ deliveries

    Mantra: Get forward, watch the ball, play shapes

    Focus Points:
    Defend stumps
    - Watch for balls on stumps, look to defend into gaps for single
    - Get forward
    - Play late
    Attack Width
    - Be decisive early
    - Play proper cricket shots
    - Attack the ball hard
    Confidence
    - Believe in technique
    - Walk at the bowler to change length/line

  10. #10
    Cricket Web Staff Member Woodster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Manchester, England
    Posts
    5,481
    Quote Originally Posted by Blocky View Post
    All very true and all good points.

    In this case, the plan above was for a two day match where runs are not as important as conservation of wickets for the first twenty overs. At club level and even representative level, a lot of teams rarely manage to bat fifty overs, let alone 70-80 overs in a longer format.

    It's highly important regardless of match situation in club cricket to get through to the 15th or 20th over with as little wickets gone as possible because bowlers will get frustrated, tired and second string bowlers will have to bowl overs. That's where you or the middle order can capitalise.

    Singles come by nature of looking for them, being able to dab into gaps on the offside or wait for the ball to be on the pads where ticking it around the corner or playing through midwicket is virtually riskless means runs will come regardless of defensive technique.

    In one day cricket at club level, I can almost guarantee you that a side who is 50-1 after 20 will more likely post 250 in 50 than a side who is 95 for 4.

    But alternately, my plan in one day cricket generally has a shorter time period of getting in - I look to play the first 6-10 overs conservatively, look for singles, turn the strike over but shelve riskier shots - if we haven't lost wickets, I'll increase the momentum, generally by going to cricket shots I know I play well (in my case, cuts, cover drives and sweeping the spinners) while being a bit more forceful on drives.

    In this case I'm fortunate that I know my role in the team, so I can prepare properly during the week. From a captains point of view, it'd be great if you can get your team into same tracks of thought, so they know where they're playing on Tuesday (and can get their plans in order during training for the week).

    For middle order batsman, you might have two plans - one for being in before the 20th over and one for being in after the 20th. In any case, I'd say give yourself 10-15 balls before you even look to play beyond a basic range of shots, this is the secret to developing consistency and eventually you'll find yourself naturally able to off drive, ondrive and straight drive without risk which will add to your runrate.
    It looks a good plan for yourself, you know how you play and what's expected of you, but there has to be some flexibility involved. The general rules of thumb you've followed here are excellent guidelines for a player, but there are plenty of variables that you would need to think about, so your plan doesn't remain to rigid and you think on your feet.

    Another example may be during a limited overs game and you recognise there is a weak link in their attack and you may need to attack him early, whenever he bowls.

    It's good to have a plan, and you clearly think about what you need to do, but do not be afraid to sway from that should the situation dictate.

  11. #11
    Cricket Spectator Ozzie Osborne's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    yorkshire
    Posts
    4
    dont over think it, keep it simple.

    At 5 your going to be required to play to the match situation, this might be scoring quickly in a 20/20 or stabalising a collapse. If 3 is where you play your best batsmen then 5 is probably where you want a experienced, flexible player capable of grafting hard or building on a solid foundation.
    Last edited by Ozzie Osborne; 30-01-2011 at 03:10 AM.

  12. #12
    State Captain slowfinger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Worcs.
    Posts
    1,972
    Quote Originally Posted by Blocky View Post
    And just to show how plans may change based on match situation....

    Here is my one day batting plan for this week - I may be selected to play premier cricket and assume that I'll be asked to do a job in the lower order and play more as a bowler than a batsman (I'm an all rounder who just happens to also open the batting)

    Gameplan: 27/11/2010
    Match Situation: OD
    Preparation for: Prems

    Batting Assuming Position #6-10

    Batting: Two Phases

    Phase 1: Assess the situation
    Time: 0-10 deliveries at crease

    Mantra: Get forward, watch the ball

    Focus Points:
    Strong defensive platform
    - Play with soft hands
    - Get forward
    - Play late
    - Leave well
    Scoring Shots
    - Punch into off side for singles
    - Drives in the V
    - Work off the legs
    Goals
    - See ten deliveries
    - Feed strike to other batsman
    - Look to have 5 runs off 10 balls

    Phase 2: Sensible attacking cricket
    Time: 10+ deliveries

    Mantra: Get forward, watch the ball, play shapes

    Focus Points:
    Defend stumps
    - Watch for balls on stumps, look to defend into gaps for single
    - Get forward
    - Play late
    Attack Width
    - Be decisive early
    - Play proper cricket shots
    - Attack the ball hard
    Confidence
    - Believe in technique
    - Walk at the bowler to change length/line
    Very good, might even try that for myself ^^
    Quote Originally Posted by zaremba
    If Shoiab starts throwing his jockstrap around, they're all going to catch something

    Accidental Founder of the Fawad Alam Appreciation Society!

    Slowfinger - An active member of CricketWeb for 7 years and counting!



Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Battrick
    By James in forum Battrick
    Replies: 2450
    Last Post: 18-12-2012, 03:55 AM
  2. Where should i improve
    By ash chaulk in forum Battrick
    Replies: 408
    Last Post: 05-06-2008, 05:59 AM
  3. Archived [18/10/06] : Battrick
    By DJellett in forum Battrick
    Replies: 10623
    Last Post: 17-10-2006, 12:20 PM
  4. Club Cricket 9-10 Results
    By Mr Mxyzptlk in forum CW Offseason Club Cricket
    Replies: 964
    Last Post: 27-04-2006, 03:41 PM
  5. **Official** Club Cricket (8-9)
    By Mr Mxyzptlk in forum CW Offseason Club Cricket
    Replies: 742
    Last Post: 08-09-2005, 07:38 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •