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Thread: As a batsman, how much more difficult is swing bowling to face?

  1. #16
    Hall of Fame Member Goughy's Avatar
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    Yeah, agree. Dont mind facing swing at all.

    Geniune pace where I trouble to get my feet moving or something that moves late of the pitch which make adjustment hard are far more troubling.

    If you watch the ball, the swinging ball usually gives you a shot that allows you to ease the ball rather than force it.
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  2. #17
    International Regular Josh's Avatar
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    I am extremely capable of playing outswing which begs the question as to why I have never opened the batting. Inswing I can't play for peanuts.

    Why?

    I'm a hell of a lot more proficient on the offside than the legside and I GET FORWARD to negate as much swing as possible. So I find outswing rather easy to face, but an inswinger will get me out probably 6 balls out of 10 because of my poor defense.

  3. #18
    Hall of Fame Member Son Of Coco's Avatar
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    I think it depends on how early it swings (and at what pace obviously). As a bowler I've found seam more effective, but that may be because I always seamed it around until the last couple of years when I developed inswing.
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  4. #19
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    yea but a fast bowler who swings it is a lot harder to face than a fast bowler who bowls straight...

    theres no comparison. Youre sounding like if you bowl straight you suddenly gain pace...you can bowl fast and swing it too.


  5. #20
    Hall of Fame Member Son Of Coco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bond21 View Post
    yea but a fast bowler who swings it is a lot harder to face than a fast bowler who bowls straight...

    theres no comparison. Youre sounding like if you bowl straight you suddenly gain pace...you can bowl fast and swing it too.
    No, that's why I said it depends on what pace they're bowling. If it swings straight out of the hand though, and it's highly repetitive then it won't be as difficult as someone with variation swinging it late. 130kph and straight would be quick enough to get me 9.9/10. A guy who swings it in third grade is only going to get you out if you go to sleep before it arrives. It's fairly obvious that a guy who bowls fast and swings it a lot is going to be harder to face than a guy who bowls fast and straight.

  6. #21
    Hall of Fame Member Goughy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bond21 View Post
    yea but a fast bowler who swings it is a lot harder to face than a fast bowler who bowls straight...

    theres no comparison. Youre sounding like if you bowl straight you suddenly gain pace...you can bowl fast and swing it too.
    A fast bowler that swings it will have to pitch it half a yard further up (at least) than one that doesnt. A fast swing bowler has to be on his game otherwise the ball is in the slot for the batsman and can be taken apart. Extra swing, width or on the pads on a full length is meat and drink to a good batsman.

    Those that bowl straight or seam are looking more for that inbetween length to get the batsman caught or trapped neither forward or back or just not getting the feet in the correct position. They also have a greater margin for error

    To be overly simplistic, more wickets you see at a very good standard are due to the length than the swing.

    The difference in lengths different types of bowlers have to bowl (even of the same speed) is an important difference.

    Its not as easy as saying swing is very good as it is another weapon, as you have to give up other things in order to utilise that tool.

  7. #22
    U19 Debutant _TiGeR-ToWn_'s Avatar
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    Facing a bowler who can send down off-cutters and leg-cutters on a regular basis with pace and accuracy is the hardest bowler to face on the cricket field. I feel with swing bowling there is more chances of loose deliveries (more scoring chances) then cutters. Cutters move just enough to other take the edge or miss your bat (LBW).
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  8. #23
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    As an opening batsman, I generally play outswing very, very well. I can only think once of getting out to a bowler who didn't actually swing the ball, bowling medium pacers - he bowled while I wasn't looking... he didn't pull himself up, nor did the umpire.. I was out.

    The only time, during this summer I was beaten by an outswinger was when I played and missed a couple of times to a right hand bowler (I'm a left hand batsman) pitching the ball outside leg stump and finishing it with the ball probably a foot away from off stump. I simply left about 12 balls until he got frustrated, put extra speed on it and in turn, scrambled the seam - easy runs through covers and on the leg side. I made 80 odd that day.

    I used to play outswing much better than I did inswing, but after working on my onside play and my balance, I am proficient with both. I never get out to outswing because I get a long way foward..

    The secret to playing outswing, or any form of swing is to watch the ball onto your bat, watch the thing hit your bat, and look where the ball used to be! It really is that easy.

    But in answer to your question, yes, it is much tougher to face swing bowling than straight bowling. The batsman will find that in order to stay out there for an extended period of time, he is going to have to concentrate much harder and is more likely to make a rash decision ending up in a wicket. As long as the batsman leaving the ball very often, doesn't frustrate the bowler. Remember, dot balls are good balls - if he's not hitting them, the pressure is building up on him, and make sure the bowler or the fielder lets him know about it.

    I remember my brother once saying about a batsman who had left about 8 or 9 consecutive balls, "These runs are going to get themselves, he says boys." - Next ball, edge to me at first slip. Game over.

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