View Poll Results: Can Graeme Swann be succesful in the Ashes?

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  • Yes

    23 65.71%
  • No

    4 11.43%
  • Nathan McCullum

    8 22.86%
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Thread: Graeme Swann

  1. #31
    Hall of Fame Member aussie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard View Post
    "Controlled aggression" is essentially a figment of imagination. It basically means "aggression that comes-off". If agressive strokes fail they're perceived as reckless; if they succeed they're perceived as controlled aggression.

    It's the result that determines the term, not the other way around.
    Yea your right. But looking back @ the instances with KP @ TB & Symo @ Perth, fact reamins those shots where utterly reckless, they basically threw their wickets away in utter disdain for Harris.

    KP especially was horrific given how he played Warne & Murali in the past battles.

    So maybe "controlled aggression" is the right term, but they certainly with better play should not have gotten out to Harris.


    Quote Originally Posted by Uppercut
    That's like saying "if batsmen played Shane Warne with more conviction, he wouldn't be so effective". Or "if batsmen weren't so terrified of Curtly Ambrose, they wouldn't get out to him so often.".
    They couldn't. These where two legends who combined the ability to initidate best of batsmen - through a great ability to tie them down & produce fantastic deliveries.

    So unless they where the calibre of Lara, Tendy - they couldn't have shown has much conviction as they wanted. They generally came out second best.


    Harris on the other hand, as i said before. Is a nothing bowling who basically in a SA attack of the last 2 years, in which the pace trio of has been the main soruce of wickets. Harris main use is to block up and end, given that he's accurate - and batsmen generally due to the fact that they see him as garbage, foolishly get themselves out.

    Now that Ntini is in delcine, Morkel not yet stepping up & Kallis days as a bowler coming to an end. Just leaving Steyn as the big quick. He will be well exposed & I expect my point to be validated in the next year or so.

    If not well so be it, i aint nostradamus

    Quote Originally Posted by Uppercut
    The attitudes batsmen take to you are part and parcel of your bowling, and hence you deserve credit when it benefits you. Batsmen didn't play Warne with more conviction, and they didn't counter the fear factor of Ambrose, so it's a stupid thing to say.
    Or rather the SA pace trio deserves credit for putting batsmen under pressure, thus basically turning him into a "smash me please" option for batsmen. He deserves no credit.

    Could you imagine him being in NZ's side in the games they played vs Australia since 2000.

    The batsmen super aggressive, generally average opening bowlers & him having to basically contain & get batsmen out like Vettori did?. He would have been destroyed, since he does nothing with the ball, his little ability to be accurate wouldn't mean a thing.

    Fact is guys like Giles, Wiseman could to the job he is doing for SA just as well...

  2. #32
    Cricket Web: All-Time Legend Uppercut's Avatar
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    If that's the case, I'd like to ask why he continues to take wickets even when the rest of the attack are bowling badly? Check out- as the most prominent examples of Harris's contempt-invoking success- KP's hole-out to De Villiers mid-on (followed closely by Flintoff in the same over), Symonds's skier to McKenzie at deep midwicket and his match-winning performance in the third test against Australia recently, and you'll notice that in all three scenarios, the rest of the attack had already failed to break down the batsmen. How does the "welcome relief" theory stand up to that?
    Quote Originally Posted by zaremba View Post
    The Filth have comfortably the better bowling. But the Gash have the batting. Might be quite good to watch.

  3. #33
    Cricket Web: All-Time Legend Furball's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard View Post
    "Controlled aggression" is essentially a figment of imagination. It basically means "aggression that comes-off". If agressive strokes fail they're perceived as reckless; if they succeed they're perceived as controlled aggression.

    It's the result that determines the term, not the other way around.
    No it's not. Tendulkar, particularly in ODIs, has been an absolute master of it.

    You don't strike at 87 opening the batting in ODIs without being aggressive. Likewise, you don't average 47 if you don't exercise some element of control.

    You can be wrecklessly aggressive, where you basically look to hit the bowler out of the ground. If it pays off, you look like a genius, if it doesn't you look like an idiot (see Kevin Pietersen vs Australia, 5th Test 2005, South Africa, 3rd Test 2008 and West Indies, 1st Test 2008/09). You can also bring an element of control into being aggressive, where you look to hit boundaries off a bowler without resorting to the aerial route.

  4. #34
    Cricket Web: All-Time Legend Furball's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aussie View Post
    Fact is guys like Giles, Wiseman could to the job he is doing for SA just as well...
    No they wouldn't. Giles wasn't a good enough bowler.

    Harris averages 32 with the ball for a reason. He is not an outstanding spin bowler like Murali or Warne, but by the same token he isn't utterly hopeless with the ball either.


  5. #35
    Cricket Web Staff Member Richard's Avatar
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    There's really not a lot between Giles and Harris. If Harris plays as often as Giles did when he should not his average will end-up somewhere close to Giles'. It's easy to judge a player when his career is in full motion and another's is finished.

    As I say, Harris is decent but his record to date flatters him.

    Both are bowlers who offer something on a turning deck and nothing else.
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  6. #36
    Cricket Web Staff Member Richard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GingerFurball View Post
    No it's not. Tendulkar, particularly in ODIs, has been an absolute master of it.

    You don't strike at 87 opening the batting in ODIs without being aggressive. Likewise, you don't average 47 if you don't exercise some element of control.

    You can be wrecklessly aggressive, where you basically look to hit the bowler out of the ground. If it pays off, you look like a genius, if it doesn't you look like an idiot (see Kevin Pietersen vs Australia, 5th Test 2005, South Africa, 3rd Test 2008 and West Indies, 1st Test 2008/09). You can also bring an element of control into being aggressive, where you look to hit boundaries off a bowler without resorting to the aerial route.
    Even Shahid Afridi - who in reality is just idiotically aggressive every time he bats - has been said to be showing controlled aggression simply when it comes-off. Afridi never really looks like a genius to me, he just looks like someone who has enough talent to make an utterly stupid way of batting come-off every now and then.

    Tendulkar is good - not controlled aggressive, just good. It's natural, and nothing else, for him to score like that. He doesn't control anything, he just plays. Same true of the likes of Lara and Ponting. Pietersen is much more manufactured and often goes OTT. But still, when it comes-off people praise him to the high heavens. Pietersen is, however, quite capable of playing reservedly and is generally at his best when more measured.

  7. #37
    Cricket Web: All-Time Legend Uppercut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard View Post
    Even Shahid Afridi - who in reality is just idiotically aggressive every time he bats - has been said to be showing controlled aggression simply when it comes-off. Afridi never really looks like a genius to me, he just looks like someone who has enough talent to make an utterly stupid way of batting come-off every now and then.

    Tendulkar is good - not controlled aggressive, just good. It's natural, and nothing else, for him to score like that. He doesn't control anything, he just plays. Same true of the likes of Lara and Ponting. Pietersen is much more manufactured and often goes OTT. But still, when it comes-off people praise him to the high heavens. Pietersen is, however, quite capable of playing reservedly and is generally at his best when more measured.
    Hmm, not sure if i agree. I've always thought he's been at his best when he sees himself in then hits out. When he tries to go nuts from ball one, he usually fails. When he tries to play like a "proper batsman" he doesn't score as many runs. It's the get set-->go nuts combination that KP specialises in IMO.

  8. #38
    Cricket Web Staff Member Richard's Avatar
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    Certainly Pietersen is better when he gets set rather than tries to blast from ball one. However, pretty much no batsman has ever been best in "go nuts" fashion. Even Viv Richards, who legend might tell you did such a thing, actually played his best innings' in generally orthodox manner, apart from whipping anything on off and straigher through leg.

    Batsmen always need to treat each ball on its merits rather than having a predetermined plan, in Test cricket (under "standard" circumstances - if you're going for a declaration in 6 overs' time or are chasing 130 in 25 overs, clearly it's different). It's always the best method for success. Those merits change as you get more established - while Pietersen might leave a short-of-length ball just outside off early in his innings, he might well whack it through mid-wicket later on - but it's never, ever a good idea to be thinking "this over's going for eight minimum", or similar.

  9. #39
    Cricket Web: All-Time Legend Uppercut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard View Post
    Certainly Pietersen is better when he gets set rather than tries to blast from ball one. However, pretty much no batsman has ever been best in "go nuts" fashion. Even Viv Richards, who legend might tell you did such a thing, actually played his best innings' in generally orthodox manner, apart from whipping anything on off and straigher through leg.

    Batsmen always need to treat each ball on its merits rather than having a predetermined plan, in Test cricket (under "standard" circumstances - if you're going for a declaration in 6 overs' time or are chasing 130 in 25 overs, clearly it's different). It's always the best method for success.
    KP's aggression isn't about having a predetermined plan, it's about having a broad definition of the term "bad ball". How short and wide does a ball have to be before you swing at it? How full before you drive it? How full before you use your feet to the spinners? KP at his best treats a lot more balls as "bad" than he does when he's playing defensively.

    Despite his well-publicised holing out on 94, he gets out a lot more often playing defensive strokes than attacking ones IMO. He's not tight enough in defence for "trying to eliminate risk" (a ridiculous concept, but anyway) to be his best method of scoring runs.

  10. #40
    Cricket Web Staff Member Richard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uppercut View Post
    KP's aggression isn't about having a predetermined plan, it's about having a broad definition of the term "bad ball". How short and wide does a ball have to be before you swing at it? How full before you drive it? How full before you use your feet to the spinners? KP at his best treats a lot more balls as "bad" than he does when he's playing defensively.
    This is a point I make regularly about strokeplaying batsmen. A bad ball to a Pietersen or Gilchrist is not a bad ball to a Boycott or Gavaskar - but there is no difference in the effectiveness of such players; they're all outstanding, even though they have different methods of achieving this outstandingness.

    However, some batsmen do clearly suffer for having predetermined plans - and Pietersen to my mind has occasionally done so.
    Despite his well-publicised holing out on 94, he gets out a lot more often playing defensive strokes than attacking ones IMO. He's not tight enough in defence for "trying to eliminate risk" (a ridiculous concept, but anyway) to be his best method of scoring runs.
    I don't disagree that he's gotten out more often to defensive shots than attacking ones, not at all. The stupid thing is that when he gets out to attacking shots he's pilloried for not being more defensive and when he gets out to defensive shots he's pilloried for not playing more expansively (usually the latter is quieter than the former but it's still certainly there).

    However, I happen to think that Pietersen is quite capable of scoring plenty of runs playing in either fashion. He's done so more than once with each.

  11. #41
    Cricket Web: All-Time Legend Top_Cat's Avatar
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    Think first Test is crucial for Swan. If he takes some tap, I reckon we won't see him for the rest of the series. If he takes a few wickets (not necessaily a bag), I get the feeling he's one of those bowlers who'll just get tougher to play as the series wears on. Has much talent, only seems to be short of experience from what I've seen and doesn't quite have all of the pieces of his bowling entirely in place on the same day. A decent performance early on could change that quickly
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  12. #42
    Cricket Web: All-Time Legend Uppercut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Top_Cat View Post
    Think first Test is crucial for Swan. If he takes some tap, I reckon we won't see him for the rest of the series. If he takes a few wickets (not necessaily a bag), I get the feeling he's one of those bowlers who'll just get tougher to play as the series wears on. Has much talent, only seems to be short of experience from what I've seen and doesn't quite have all of the pieces of his bowling entirely in place on the same day. A decent performance early on could change that quickly
    I don't necessarily agree with that. He's 30, and he's more than used to getting hit around a little. From what I've seen he does prefer when he can tie a batsman down, but it's not going to screw his head over for the rest of the series if he's taken for a few runs in Cardiff.

  13. #43
    Hall of Fame Member TT Boy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aussie View Post

    Fact is guys like Giles, Wiseman could to the job he is doing for SA just as well...
    Bumbaclaat!

    Pull the other one. Wiseman averaged close to 50 for NZ and wasn’t even remotely that economical as an international bowler.

    Harro in contrast as the above poster mentioned, has more than handy test record (average and economy) and domestically has a record which denotes he is far more than a nothing bowler (and always has time to out-bowl his more alluring Titans spinning teammate, Imran Tahir).

  14. #44
    Cricket Web Staff Member Richard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uppercut View Post
    I don't necessarily agree with that. He's 30, and he's more than used to getting hit around a little. From what I've seen he does prefer when he can tie a batsman down, but it's not going to screw his head over for the rest of the series if he's taken for a few runs in Cardiff.
    Yeah, Swann's one of the more phlegmatic types you'll see. Possibly a more multi-talented bowler than another of the phlegmatic types of recent times, Ashley Giles, too. And, crucially, far more likely to have the team deliberately try to play to his strength at home than Giles ever was.

    But yeah, I mean, any bowler who says "the latter" to the question "would you prefer 30 overs for 70 or 30 overs for 110?" is a rather strange fellow. Any bowler will always prefer to tie batsmen down, and with seamers if they're good enough to do it there's nothing the batsman can do to stop them - save getting out, obviously. Against spinners there is sometimes a way to take to them, as they bowl sufficiently slowly.

  15. #45
    Hall of Fame Member superkingdave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ricky poniting
    I'm not sure England have an advantage in spin - I've seen Swann bowl and Nathan Hauritz is a fairly similar sort of bowler. We have some part-timers who will prove a bit of a handful if the ball turns. We haven't got Warnie now but are they (England spinners) any more of a threat? They had Giles four years ago so they probably have slightly better spinners than they did then.
    Heard some commentators claiming that Ponting said Hauritz was as good as Swann...now looking at the quote that's not at all what he really said.

    But i've not seen much of Hauritz bowl...is he a similar bowler to Swann?

    Not sure i disagree with Ponting's comment on Swann being a slight improvement on Giles, but Giles did an ok job in 05 on pitches that weren't that responsive.
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